Cream For Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    i have keratosis pilaris, can someone who also have this recommend me creams/medicines?
    i have it on the back of my legs

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is typically found more often on the upper, front of the legs and upper arms, but regardless of where your KP is, the following treatment recommendations will work....

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre?
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co?

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of exfoliating those affected areas. Also, you do not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc? And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3?s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3?s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 ? 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-?

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      Check out the sites below for more information....

  2. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?!?
    Okay, so I was recently diagnosed with the skin condition Keratosis Pilaris.

    (sucks)

    I was just wondering, people out there with it too, what worked best for you at relieving it?

    i was prescribed Differin, a Retin-A type ointment.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is an extremely common and benign disorder of keratinized hair follicles. Etiology is unknown, although it may be due to a disorder of corneocyte adhesion that prevents normal desquamation in the area around the follicle.

      Medical Care

      Education and reassurance are the cornerstones of therapy for keratosis pilaris.
      The noninflamed horny papules usually remit with age and increasing time, but they are resistant to most forms of short-term therapy.
      Encourage tepid showers instead of hot baths, along with the use of mild soaps and a home humidifier.
      An emollient cream may help alleviate rough surfaces in mild cases. A topical keratolytic agent such as lactic acid, salicylic acid, or urea preparations may be beneficial in more extensive cases. Several recent reports claim good results with 2-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. Topical tretinoin therapy has also been used with varying degrees of success.
      Lesions with significant inflammation may improve with the use of medium-potency emollient-based topical steroid preparations. Inflammation is usually reduced markedly by 7 days, at which point the steroid should be discontinued.

  3. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?
    I have keratosis pilaris. It's a skin disorder that makes little white bumps on your arms where you have hair and dry skin. I thought that they were pimples so i would pop them. A white almost solid substance comes out...what is it?!? i don't think it's puss...help!

    • ANSWER:
      Because keratosis pilaris causes little blocked pore ducts, they very often appear just like little pimples with tiny amount of pus in them.

      What you want to do is make sure you have a good exfolliant wash with alpha hydroxy or urea in it and use it every other day with a buff puff. The next thing you want is intensive moisture like CeraVe Cream (available at many drug stores) that you apply after your shower after patting dry.

      Sometimes an anti-biotic such as tetracycline can reduce the inflammation in the pores and make the keratosis pilaris much less unsightly.

      If you go on the American Academy of Dermatology web pages, you will get the best treatment ideas that you can discuss with your dermatologist.

      The products I described above are available over the counter other than the anti-biotic.

      You condition is harmless, not contagious and not infectious, so don't worry. Just treat it to make it look better for your own happiness.

  4. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    anyone else here have the condition? if so which cream do you use and what do you find most effective in helping it out

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris; treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, Retin-A, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha-hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Keratosis pilaris often improves with age, and can even disappear completely by middle-age. Some, however, will have keratosis pilaris for life.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, swell, and even multiply. In some cases, they will bleed and/or scar.

  5. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about Keratosis Pilaris?
    What can i do to make it go away? I am using AmLactin Cream and it is not working!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it?s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the ?goose bumps? are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Treatment

      There is no known cure for Keratosis pilaris, though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring.)

  6. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris HELP!!?
    Ok so I have Keratosis Pilaris all up and down my arms. It's embarrassing....and nothing works. I've been trying to figure out ways to cover it up with regular foundation and I was wondering what anyone had to recommend. I heard MAC's face and body was a good one, but are there any at Sephora???

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  7. QUESTION:
    Relieving keratosis pilaris?
    I have it all over my arms and it's made me really self conscious of my arms. I moisturise them every now and then and it helps a bit but not massively. It's a bit red and looks awful :(
    I know that you can't exactly cure it but I would be very grateful for any suggestions to make it less noticeable. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris, or KP, is a common skin condition. The disease shows up as small bumps on the skin that give the appearance of chicken skin. Almost half of the population is afflicted with this disease, according to Dr. Audrey Kunin of the DermaDoctor website. Most of the bumps form on the upper arms, back of thighs and the buttocks. KP is harmless and is not contagious, but in some cases the symptoms are severe. KP has no cure, but treatments often help. To keep the symptoms at bay, treatments must continue, or the bumps will reoccur.

      try this

      Things You'll Need

      Lemon oil
      Green tea oil
      Moisturizers
      Baking soda
      Salt

      Instructions

      1
      Use several products. KP "responds best to a multi-therapeutic approach," says Dr. Kunin. The approach to KP is to exfoliate, lubricate and use anti-inflammatory products.

      2
      Exfoliate the skin. When you exfoliate, you remove the dead skin cells on the surface of the skin and also deep clean the pores. Scrubs are good exfoliants. Baking soda is a good homemade exfoliant, especially when combined with water to form a paste. A paste made from salt and water is another good scrub. Commercial scrubbers, such as St. Ives Apricot Scrub, are a good choice.

      3
      Use vitamin A capsules. A derivative of vitamin A called retinol is used to treat KP. The Mayo Clinic says that retinols are used for "promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle." For a more natural form of vitamin A, break open a capsule and squeeze the oil onto the skin.

      4
      Use alpha hydroxy acids. There are natural acids that are mild. The lactic acid found in milk and yogurt gently exfoliates the skin. Applying these substances to the affected areas will deep clean and smooth the bumps of KP. Glycolic acid is made of fruit acids and is a popular skincare product. You can buy glycolic acid from skincare centers or online. You can also buy lotions and creams that have glycolic acid as the main ingredient.

      5
      Moisturize your skin. Moisturizers soften the skin and the KP bumps. Lemon oil has citric acid that also helps to exfoliate the skin. Green tea oil is recommended for KP by Dr. Kunin. Green tea has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Camellia oil has vitamins useful to the skin, such as A, B and E. Cocoa butter is made of vegetable oil and deeply penetrates the skin, so it is an excellent moisturizer. Commercial lotions from Jergens, Vaseline Intensive Care and Lubriderm are good for hydrating the skin.

  8. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris...?
    I've had these red bumps on my upper arms for while now and from reading a number of articles and looking at pictures, I'm pretty sure that its KP... Does anyone know why it happens? How to make it go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      * Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      * Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

      Hope this helps!

  9. QUESTION:
    KERATOSIS PILARIS HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?
    Ok, I have had keratosis pilaris forever, and I am literally so, so sick of it. It makes me feel gross, and just I don't know what else to say other than gross. Can someone, anyone just tell me what helped with your keratosis pilaris, any help or advice would be great, thankyou so much.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.
      Hope it helps.Take care and regards.

  10. QUESTION:
    is this keratosis pilaris?
    this is under my thigh. and like...my butt. has red dots? lol sorry, ik this is kinda gross but i needa ask.

    http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa477/LysaMirelly/PC290769.jpg

    this one is clearer*
    http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa477/LysaMirelly/PC290770.jpg

    thnxxx every1<3

    • ANSWER:
      It does look like keratosis pilaris. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  11. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris question.?
    I went to a dermatologist and I was told I had keratosis pilaris, and that it was not curable. I've come to understand this condition has a lot to do with the hairs in your skin, almost like ingrown hairs but a bit different. If that's the case, do you believe laser hair removal may help this problem because lotions haven't done a thing for me.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is an extremely common condition affecting nearly 50% (or more) of the adult population. As your physician mentioned, it is not curable and therefore, laser hair removal probably won't help or he/she would have recommended it.

      I've attached several links about KP. Your best treatment is to educate yourself about your condition and follow your physician's recommendations, including the use of any topical creams he/she may have prescribed.

      Links:
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001462.htm

      Good luck!

  12. QUESTION:
    Diprobase cream for keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my arms, I have started using diprobase cream.
    Has anyone used it before and has it cleared up your keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      i had a trial for about 6 months, it didnt do too much honestly, but most creams i have ever tried only made it redder. have you tried kerafoam? it has helped the most out of what ive ever tried. using it twice a day improved it id say 60/100

  13. QUESTION:
    Good Cream for Keratosis pilaris?
    Hi Guys, I get Keratosis Pilaris on my arms, does anybody know of a really good cream or shower gel that can help with this? I have tried Eucerin and Aveeno cream but they irritated the problem. Thanks, Nat

    • ANSWER:
      try E45

      i have a similiar rash which has only recently started on my arms n this cream really helps to cool it down and relieve itching :D

  14. QUESTION:
    Is It Keratosis Pilaris?
    i have little white bumps on my upper arms, stomach and a bit of my lower back... the bumps are slightly raised.

    do milk baths help get rid/reduse its appearance?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

  15. QUESTION:
    What are good creams,scrubs,lotions,soaps,etc. for keratosis pilaris?
    I have it and really bad! Here's a link showing a picture and definition.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      Go to your doctor and ask for Triamcinolone Acetonide cream...I myself am a sufferer of Keratosis Pilaris and the cream really helps to moisturize the skin and make it more smooth...also get Alpha Hydroxy lotion or cream...it is usually in the cosmetics section and it is usually a face cream...but the alpha hydroxy acid in the cream/lotion helps to dissolve some of the kertain and make some of the bumps and redness go away...it doesn't take them away completely and you will probably have scars from it, but it helps improve the feel of your skin and some of the redness and inflamation

  16. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    i have this skin condition and its very common but i have a bad case of it its all over the backs of my arms,thights,buttox,and upper back does Any one know how to treat it or any good creams please help its really frustrating....

    • ANSWER:
      Molly, hello. I recommend that you should try the anti-eczema Cream by Champori for your Keratosis P. It is an herbal remedy and it worked better than anything else for my condition. I got it from the company in Colorado and they offer the money back guarantee so there is nothing to lose. My "goose bumps" flattened in just a couple of weeks and haven't come back since (more than a year now!)
      Best,
      Bernadette

  17. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris and arthritis cream?
    I've had this skin disorder since I was a baby (23 now). It's nothing harmful, but having 'permanent goosebumps' can be rather aggravating. I tried to look up cures for the disorder, but there's nothing out there to keep your skin from overproducing Keratin (that I know of anyway). My mother suggested using arthritis cream and I picked up a tube of Zostrix the other day. I put it on the bumpy parts of my body (legs, arms, and some of my back). After using it just after day, my skin is remarkably smoother. The only downfall to it is that it burns pretty badly and my skin turns red. I took a bath the following day and it felt like I was on fire. I read the box and it says not to use if you have damaged skin and I guess that's why, but it works GREAT on Keratosis Pilaris (better than anything I've tried). I guess it dries...or either burns....out the excess Keratin. Just wondering if anyone else has used this remedy and if you felt the same extreme burning sensation.

    • ANSWER:
      I haven't used that, BUt i do use KP Duty its about 35.00 dollars a bottle or you can buy the whole kit for about 60.00 and it comes with additional lotions and scrubs. It works fairly well, and it DOES burn. (It is for Keratosis Pelaris,)So the burning sensation may be normal. But if it burns too much, that may be a serious problem and you should consult a doctor.
      I like KP duty, it works well and the only thing is to stay away from the sun, when you use it, or apply a sun block after your put on the KP duty.

  18. QUESTION:
    Accutane and Keratosis Pilaris?
    So I'm seventeen, and I am hopefully going to be starting Accutane (or at least a generic form of it) soon. I don't really have cystic acne, however, I do have severe acne and (on my body) what the doctor says is keratosis pilaris. I've had pimples on my face since i was i think 8 years old, and all it did over time was spread. It has gotten really bad, and the keratosis pilaris has developed all over my back, arms, and chest (even a small new breakout on my upper abdomen). Lots of blackheads on my upper back, too.

    I'm sick of using antibiotics and creams and washes that do NOTHING. A gel called Ziana I'll admit helped improve my facial acne for a while when I was maybe 15, but now it's gotten worse again to the point where I was before that gel. Both of my sisters took accutane in the past, neither really had cystic acne but it worked for them. And my acne is even worse than theirs was, but I don't think they had keratosis pilaris. And yes, I'm aware of the side effects, and im willing to take the risk. But I've heard several arguments stating that people's keratosis pilaris got WORSE after they were on it, but it helped with there acne. I don't want my body skin to get worse, i hate it more than my facial acne because let's face it, makeup on the chest and arms is hard to deal with and makeup on your back is just impossible. So I'd like to know if anybody who had KP or something similar to what I've described, can tell me how it affected them? I really want this to work for me, please, anything you guys can tell me would be much appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Accutane usually makes keratosis pilaris worse--for some people it actually causes it. If your keratosis pilaris is red its gonna look even redder and more inflamed on accutane so prepare for that. I have kp too though mild, and i noticed that it got very red and noticeable on accutane (it was like I was always flushed); the redness went away for me overtime the first time I took accutane but I was on a really low dose that time. I'm on it again right now and I've definitely noticed it looks way worse but I think its mostly because I tend to flush a lot on accutane (cycline antibiotics did this to me too). Anyways, don't be so embarrassed of kp! Its pretty common and not something you should feel so embarrassed about (you don't need to put makeup on your arms!). As for going on accutane, well add the worsening kp to the long list of side effects it can cause.

  19. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    treatment options
    I know what it is. I just want alternative treatment options other than what i've already used.

    • ANSWER:
      Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  20. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I was diagnosed with KP when I was a child and it's not as bad as it was then. But how would I get rid of it or tone it down? I hate having small red bump on my upper arms and on my chest! It's quite annoying.

    Anyone know how to get rid of it or at least tone it down?

    • ANSWER:
      Exfolliation with a loofah will help, but there are also medications.

      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.

      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.

      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system.

      Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.

      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  21. QUESTION:
    Treatments for keratosis pilaris?
    What are some that have help improve the condition? i've tried eucerin and it went away but a lot came back after a while.

    • ANSWER:
      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  22. QUESTION:
    How to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 15 and I've had these little red bumps all over the backs o my arms and now they are kinda in my thighs. I've had them my whole life, or as long as I can remember. I HATE THEM. I get teased enough. What are some ways to get rid of te bumps?? Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.
      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.

  23. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris, all dermatologists creams and other perscriptions I have used have not rid or created the illusion effect of them not there anymore, does anyone have this or had this and had success and getting rid of them? I know the sun and tanning helps but I want to rid them-I am so self concious of t-shirts and tanks but I have great arms!!

    • ANSWER:
      go to dermadoctor.com and purchase a tube of KP Duty. IT WORKS!

      Both me and my child have KP and this cream, when used DAILY really works. If you stop using it, in about a month you'll notice it starting to return.
      It's not cheap, but it is worth the cost.

  24. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris....?
    i have keratosis pilaris on my arms and i wanted to know if there is any cream i can get at a drug store that would reduce the redness and bumps...

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. First of all, remember that your keratosis pilaris is basically an eczema or inflammation of the hair follicles on the upper arms, that is leading to those spiky hair follicle plugs. So a combination of therapies is indicated: some hydrocortisone to help stop the inflammation, and a lotion with lactic acid in it (AmLactin) to help rid you of the plugs.

  25. QUESTION:
    i have a skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris?
    aka chicken skin i have it on my arms, legs and even my face. ive tried every cream and exfoliater to get rid of it and it doesnt work. i cant wear face makeup because it just loooks clumped on and my face isnt smooth it reallly effects my self esteem, doees anyone know how to get rid of it?!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris is a genetic condition of the skin in which the hair follicles become plugged with hair and with dead cells from the outermost layer of skin as the skin renews itself. Normally dead cells would shed off easily but when this genetic condition is present they get stuck in the hair follicles, and due to their excessive adherence form a scaly plug. The follicles redden and inflame causing papules: tiny rough pink bumps on the surface of the skin. They are numerous in the affected area. Each one is a horny plug, sometimes rather red but only rarely itchy and never sore.

      http://www.abateit.com/keratosis-pilaris.htm

  26. QUESTION:
    How do I treat keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

  27. QUESTION:
    For people who have Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have horrid KP on my arms and legs, and I want to get rid of it.

    For people who have had it, what product worked well for you in treating KP?

    • ANSWER:

      Though quite common with young children, keratosis pilaris can occur at any age. It may improve, especially during the summer months, only to later worsen. Gradually, keratosis pilaris resolves on its own.

      When to see a doctor
      Keratosis pilaris isn't a serious medical condition, and treatment usually isn't necessary. However, if you're concerned about the appearance of your skin, consult your family doctor or a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist). He or she can often make a diagnosis by examining your skin and the characteristic scaly plugs.

      Causes
      Keratosis pilaris results from the buildup of keratin ? a hard protein that protects your skin from harmful substances and infection. The keratin forms a scaly plug that blocks the opening of the hair follicle. Usually many plugs form, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin.

      Why keratin builds up is unknown. But it may occur in association with genetic diseases or with other skin conditions, such as ichthyosis vulgaris or atopic dermatitis. Keratosis pilaris also occurs in otherwise healthy people. Dry skin tends to worsen the condition.

      Preparing for your appointment
      You're likely to start by first seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred immediately to a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist).

      Because appointments can be brief, and because there's often a lot to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

      What you can do
      Your time with your doctor is limited, so preparing a list of questions beforehand will help you make the most of your appointment. List your questions from most important to least important in case time runs out. For keratosis pilaris, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

      What is likely causing my symptoms?
      What are other possible causes for my symptoms?
      Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
      What is the best course of action?
      What are the alternatives to the primary approach that you're suggesting?
      Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing me?
      In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment at any time that you don't understand something.

      What to expect from your doctor
      Your doctor is likely to ask you several questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over any points you want to discuss more. Your doctor may ask:

      When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
      Have your symptoms been continuous, or occasional?
      What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
      What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
      Tests and diagnosis
      There is no laboratory test or skin test to diagnose keratosis pilaris. Instead, it's typically diagnosed based on an examination of your skin and a review of your medical history. Your doctor will ask questions about your signs and symptoms.

      Treatments and drugs
      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. But most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following prescription medications:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

      Lifestyle and home remedies
      Self-help measures won't cure keratosis pilaris, but they can help improve the appearance of your skin. You may find these measures beneficial:

      Be gentle when washing your skin. Vigorous scrubbi

  28. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have some red bumps on top of my arms(both lower and upper) and I have it even worse on top of my thighs and I'm starting to feel it on my calves now. No they are not razor bumps, I've had it since elementary school. I want to get rid of it soon, summer is on its way and I'm tired of covering up. I feel very self conscious about it. What do it do? I do exfoliate. My parents can't afford a dermatologist.

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

      [My note: This article is followed by 188 comments from people who have been inflicted with KP.]

  29. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?
    I have had contradicting opinions. Is it ok to use lotions with Petrolium and other heavier moisturzing agents in them? or will it clog the pores, I have found that the body butters and thicker creams are the only things that help make my skin smooth. Now i'm not sure if they clog my pores and make the KP worst?!

    I was perscribed a lotion, havent used it long enough to see if it works, but my skin is still a little dry I think i will need to use another lotion in addition to it i think, plus one for the non kp parts of my body

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, it sounds like you have taken great steps towards controlling your Keratosis Pilaris, or KP as it is often called. As long as you do not experience any inflammation (such as symptoms of itching, pain, redness, etc.), you can try to layer your Lachydrin with your Lustra, but use your Retin A solo at bedtime. Since alpha hydroxy acids (lachydrin is lactic acid which falls into this category) help soften the skin and hydrate as well, this allows a better absorption of other products. So apply Lachydrin first, give it a few minutes to dry and then apply your Lustra. Also, KP can definitely be accompanied by skin discoloration, whether brown or more of a reddish purple. The skin bleach with help with the brown discoloration. If you have reddness, then you may want to try Mederma. Also, if you need to give more of a blast to your KP to smooth out the skin, you may want to consider alternating your lachydrin with Carmol 20 Cream as urea is quite helpful or even use Epilyt Lotion periodically. The propylene glycol helps smooth out the bumps. I usually have the patient apply Epilyt Lotion at night as it is a bit oily. Use it sparingly for this reason. If you have not had the opportunity to read through my article on this topic, Keratosis Pilaris you may find it helpful. Our product DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin contains glycolic acid and urea and has achieved great clinical results. Take a look at our DERMAwizard for Keratosis Pilaris which you should find helpful.

      For more info, check out these...
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/singlefaq.asp?FAQid=7717&AID=207717

      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/kp-rubra-faceii-red-face-flushing-blushing/2831-keratosis-pilaris-lack-arm-shape.html

      http://www.makeuptalk.com/forums/f12/keratosis-pelaris-41317.html

      : ) Good luck! : )

  30. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris??
    I think i have it && i hate it!! I dont like wearing short sleeve shirts!

    Is there any way to make it less visible?? or make it disapear?

    • ANSWER:
      i dont have it personaly, but i know a lot of my friends do and they are pretty sensative about it also. There are creams you can put on daily that will make it less red and visible and it sometimes goes away with age, here is a site all about it but it dosn't give actual creams to put on.

      disapears.http://www.umm.edu/ency/article/001462trt.htm

      Here are a few of the treatments, a little pricey but i hope i helped.
      http://www.dermstore.com/profile_Keratosis+Pilaris_400060.htm

  31. QUESTION:
    How do i treat Keratosis pilaris?
    It itches and its on my arms and thighs please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.

      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  32. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris. Those of you who have/had it, how do you get rid of it. It's supposed to go away by the time I'm 20, but I hate my skin and want it to look nice now. Any tricks?

    • ANSWER:
      who said it goes away by 20?someone gave wrong advice-i didnt even get it till i was 45! answer-get loofah.scrub gently with every bath/shower.go to pharmacy and get any skin cream containing "urea"-no,its not urine!its a chemical in the skincream that dissolves the excess keratin buildup that leads to keratosirs pilaris.worked for me-its 2 years later,and my arms are smooth!good luck!oh-also-dont wear tight sleeves in the winter-wear something looser so ur pores can breath.most people first develop this in winter,tight sleeves contribute to the problem. ps- i love mexico,especially chiapas.

  33. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 14 and i have keratosis pilaris and i got it from my mom. shes 40 and doesnt have it at all basically. so my question is when will i grow out of it or when will it disappear a lot??
    10 PTS FOR BEST ANSWER

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately you will most likely not outgrow it. I am 36 and have been dealing with it since I was around your age. My 14 yr old daughter has a mild case of it, my 16 yr old son also has it. There are things you can do to lessen the appearance of it. My daughter uses Salix cream for hers, it helps the bumps go away, I use Amlactin lotion for mine, also mine seems to get better during the summer months when I have more sun exposure. Whatever you do, DO NOT PICK at them, it only makes it worse, then you end up with scabs and scarring! I know you probably think everyone is staring at it, because that's how I felt, but I realized later that not too many people noticed unless I had picked at them. You can ask your mom to ask your doc about the lotions and creams available, some are prescription and some you can buy at stores or online. Hope this helps!

  34. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I've been having keratosis pilaris for 3 years and it won't go away no matter what kind of lotion or cream I used. I even spend over 0 on creams and lotions and still no result. I know there no cure for it but there any way make it less noticeable ? It's really embarrassing to wear t-shirt or shorts because of this skin problem. Please give me simple direction on treatment or cream that available in pharmacy and it really work .

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily. Read here for more information.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  35. QUESTION:
    my keratosis pilaris...?
    It seems to be better when I don't touch it, when I put the stuff my doctor perscribed me, I break out and It gets red and more noticable, should I leave, or continue with the cream so it'll dissapear?

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend, first and foremost, that you speak with your doctor about your condition to find out exactly what causes your outbreaks. A lot of lotions can irritate this condition and cause more outbreaks, and some experimentation might be needed. You should perhaps do a little research online (use google and search for keratosis pilaris for starters). There are a wealth of really helpful websites out there for people with this condition. I have linked to one below.

      Here is some information I found during a search:

      Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition commonly seen on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. The skin cells that normally flake off as a fine dust from the skin form plugs in the hair follicles. These appear as small pimples that have a dry ''sandpaper'' feeling. They are usually white but sometimes rather red. They usually don't itch or hurt.

      Keratosis pilaris is particularly common in teenagers on the upper arms. It may occur in babies where it tends to be most obvious on the cheeks. It may remain for years but generally gradually disappears usually before age 30. Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. It is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out, and may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  36. QUESTION:
    I have really bad keratosis pilaris.. hellp?
    im embarrassed to show off my skin, im sick of hiding my skin, i want to wear t-shirts without a care or worry, i want to feel comfortable, what can i do to get rid of this KP. iv had enough with it, i want to be normal...

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      Treatments and drugs

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.

      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.

      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  37. QUESTION:
    What is Keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a skin condition.

      (see below)
      Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition commonly seen on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. The skin cells that normally flake off as a fine dust from the skin form plugs in the hair follicles. These appear as small pimples that have a dry ''sandpaper'' feeling. They are usually white but sometimes rather red. They usually don't itch or hurt.

      Keratosis pilaris is particularly common in teenagers on the upper arms. It may occur in babies where it tends to be most obvious on the cheeks. It may remain for years but generally gradually disappears usually before age 30. Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. It is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out, and may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  38. QUESTION:
    Rosacea and keratosis pilaris?
    hi i have both rosacea and keratosis pilaris. i am red everywhere and it is so embaressing. people are always asking how i got such a bad "sunburn" i hate it. any ways or treatments you guys know of? also do you think a tanning bed would help?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris:
      -Light exfoliants, things with glycolic acid in them, ammonium lactate, urea
      -Apply a heavy moisturizing cream
      -dry brushing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qG5M5Je-IJc
      -sun tanning http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcqzP2tZQik

      Rosacea
      -Always wash face with a gentle soap-free cleanser, use lukewarm water
      -keep face moisturized with a non-comedogenic moisturizer and with SPF

      I recommend Cetaphil and Eucerin.

  39. QUESTION:
    Help with treating keratosis pilaris?
    Hi so I am a 16 yr old girl and I think I might have keratosis pilaris. You know when you get those white bumps on your arms and thighs that look like goosebumps. well I recently noticed them becoming more visible. My mom says not to worry about it but I was just wondering if anyone else has this problem. If so, how can I treat it? vaseline? exfoliate? please I need some advice thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Definition
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors
      Keratosis pilaris is harmless (benign), does not get worse over time, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, bumps appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual bumps are small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings (follicles). The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

      Symptoms
      ? Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      ? Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      ? Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Signs and tests
      Physical examination is usually all that is needed for your health care provider to make this diagnosis. Testing is usually not necessary.

      Treatment
      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.

      Expectations
      Keratosis pilaris may fade slowly with age.

      Calling your health care provider
      Call for an appointment with your health care provider (or discuss the condition during a routine visit) if you suspect that you have keratosis pilaris and the condition does not respond to use of over-the-counter moisturizing lotions.

  40. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris treatment?
    I believe i suffer from keratosis pilaris. I have it on the outside of my upper arms. I have tried everything from exfoliating, moisturizing, taking multi vitamins, expensive creams and lots more. I HAVE to get rid of it! I live in Australia and it gets stinky hot here in summer. I can't even leave my house because i am too self conscious to wear a top without long sleeves. I have a boyfriend and i can't take my top off around him or go to the beach or have a day out on a hot day because i am worried he'll see or feel my bumps. I don't even have a job because i don't want to wear anything showing my arms. It is ruining my life. Does anyone know anything that can help get rid of it? I am desperate!!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris my friend is genetic, and it's something you'll never be able to fully "get rid of" but with religious treatment, you can minimize it's appearance.

      1) Avoid long/hot showers and baths. The heat strips the skin of it's protective oils/lipids which exacerbates the condition further.

      2) Exfoliate twice a week with a loofa at the end of your shower. It will help open up the plugged follicles on your arms.

      3) Apply a lotion with alpha-hydroxy acid to help un-plug these trapped follicles. Eucerin makes one (can be found at your local store or drugstore) that has this in it. I can't remember the name of it, but look on the label for alpha-hydroxy acid.

      4) If you have the $$$, Derma-Doctor products (can be found at Sephora) makes a scrub and a lotion for KP. I've bought them before and noticed a big difference. The clincher is that it has to be used consistently. Once I took a holiday from my KP regime, it would come back.

      5) Be consistent. This is not something you can treat for a month, and have it go away. KP is not harmful, just cosmetic. If the sight of the bumps really bother you, you have to be religious and moisturize daily and follow these tips.

      6) If none of this helps, see a dermatologist.

      7) Don't let them get to you! I'm sure your boyfriend and no one else would judge you for having these. It's more common than you think!


cream for keratosis pilaris

How To Treat Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do I treat keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

  2. QUESTION:
    How do i treat Keratosis pilaris?
    It itches and its on my arms and thighs please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.

      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have some red bumps on top of my arms(both lower and upper) and I have it even worse on top of my thighs and I'm starting to feel it on my calves now. No they are not razor bumps, I've had it since elementary school. I want to get rid of it soon, summer is on its way and I'm tired of covering up. I feel very self conscious about it. What do it do? I do exfoliate. My parents can't afford a dermatologist.

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

      [My note: This article is followed by 188 comments from people who have been inflicted with KP.]

  4. QUESTION:
    How to treat my keratosis pilaris?
    I've had this condition for a very long time. It is located on my arms, above the elbows. I never really cared about them, but I'm just so sick of them and want to treat it. I know it's not curable but I just need some kind of home treatment to lessen it. It is so unflattering when I wear strappy dresses or tank tops, and with spring coming up and all. Plus I always scratch them when I'm stressed and pick at them, which isn't good, because now there is scarring to go along with the bumps.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      You're right that KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre?
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co?

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      The moisturizers you've mentioned are good. You could also add olive oil to that list. Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc? And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3?s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3?s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 ? 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-?

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  5. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk Baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the Lactic Acid a natural Alpha Hydroxy Acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of Skin Cancer. Small amounts of Vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra Vitamin A due to the Vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  6. QUESTION:
    How to treat Keratosis Pilaris? ?
    Any treatments store brought for KP. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      While there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, there are palliative treatments available. The efficacy of these treatment methods is directly related to the individual's commitment and consistency of use.

      Creams containing the acid form of vitamin A, Tretinoin, have been shown to help. Most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, it is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by increasing the cell turnover rate of the outer layer of the skin, decreasing the amount of the keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. While keratosis pilaris is not acne, some believe this action may be of benefit to those with KP as well.

      Another retinoid that has the potential to help with keratosis pilaris is Adapalene. Benefits include increased stability when applied in conjunction with other topical medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Adapalene is a moderator of cellular differentiation, keratinization, and inflammatory processes, having both exfoliating and anti-inflammatory effects.

      An alternative is the prescription medication Triamcinolone. Most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, Triamcinolone is a synthetic corticosteroid, compounded as a cream, which has been medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema. As the action responsible for alleviating eczema symptoms is, as with retinoid creams, the reduction amount of keratin in pores, the effect of Triamcinolone on KP is expected to be similar.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments.[citation needed]

      Sulfur has been used for skin treatment predating modern medicine. Sulfur soaps, lotions, and exfoliants have been used successfully for treating KP. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) supplements used with some success often require dosage as high as 25g per day. Side effects can include thickening of hair and nails, and pale skin.

      Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight is helpful as well. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can you get rid of keratosis Pilaris?
    Is it possible to get rid of keratosis Pilaris? Like to make it go away completely?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

      [My note: This article is followed by 188 comments from people who have been inflicted with KP.]

  8. QUESTION:
    Keratosis pilaris....?
    I juss found out i had Keratosis pilaris [after many searches]&im wonderin how to get rid of em?There rly annoyin&my friends keep askin if i have like pimples on my leg or somthin.&it looks mayjor creepy when im in shorts. btw the area is ALL over my thighs.Any help?
    Thanks in advance :)

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (ker-uh-TO-sis pil-AIR-is) is a common skin condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps, usually on the arms and thighs. Though you may not like the sandpaper-like appearance of your skin, keratosis pilaris isn't serious and doesn't have long-term health implications.

      Keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat. Prescription medications and self-care measures can improve the appearance of your skin.

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769

  9. QUESTION:
    Help with treating keratosis pilaris?
    Hi so I am a 16 yr old girl and I think I might have keratosis pilaris. You know when you get those white bumps on your arms and thighs that look like goosebumps. well I recently noticed them becoming more visible. My mom says not to worry about it but I was just wondering if anyone else has this problem. If so, how can I treat it? vaseline? exfoliate? please I need some advice thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Definition
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors
      Keratosis pilaris is harmless (benign), does not get worse over time, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, bumps appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual bumps are small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings (follicles). The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

      Symptoms
      ? Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      ? Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      ? Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Signs and tests
      Physical examination is usually all that is needed for your health care provider to make this diagnosis. Testing is usually not necessary.

      Treatment
      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.

      Expectations
      Keratosis pilaris may fade slowly with age.

      Calling your health care provider
      Call for an appointment with your health care provider (or discuss the condition during a routine visit) if you suspect that you have keratosis pilaris and the condition does not respond to use of over-the-counter moisturizing lotions.

  10. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris (aka bumpy/chicken skin) all over my upper arms, upper thighs, and on my face -mostly on my cheeks. It seems to actually be SPREADING. Like now there's a bit on my lower arms. I HATE IT! )': I've already tired a lot of medications my doctor prescribed but none of them made it go away completely... The one that worked best was called something like 'lactic acid' but when I used it, it made my skin flaky and dry and itchy. So I stopped using it. Everyday, I scrub the areas with a loofah. It makes the skin a teeny bit softer for a little while but doesn't do that much help. -___- I moisturize. What else can I do??? I reallyyyy want soft smooth skin! I'm the only one in my family who has this! It's embarrassing really. D: Please help! Also, if u could, give a FREE method of treating it? I don't believe in those phony lies that trick you outta ur money. FYI, I'm a girl, 14. I'm not sure if it's gonna go away as i get older. It's not looking any better!

    • ANSWER:
      I have had it all my life, but it does fade as you get older. However, this is not likely to happen until you are much older than you are now, probably not until you mid 40s or later. Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  11. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I've been having keratosis pilaris for 3 years and it won't go away no matter what kind of lotion or cream I used. I even spend over 0 on creams and lotions and still no result. I know there no cure for it but there any way make it less noticeable ? It's really embarrassing to wear t-shirt or shorts because of this skin problem. Please give me simple direction on treatment or cream that available in pharmacy and it really work .

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily. Read here for more information.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  12. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?
    I have keratosis pilaris. It's a skin disorder that makes little white bumps on your arms where you have hair and dry skin. I thought that they were pimples so i would pop them. A white almost solid substance comes out...what is it?!? i don't think it's puss...help!

    • ANSWER:
      Because keratosis pilaris causes little blocked pore ducts, they very often appear just like little pimples with tiny amount of pus in them.

      What you want to do is make sure you have a good exfolliant wash with alpha hydroxy or urea in it and use it every other day with a buff puff. The next thing you want is intensive moisture like CeraVe Cream (available at many drug stores) that you apply after your shower after patting dry.

      Sometimes an anti-biotic such as tetracycline can reduce the inflammation in the pores and make the keratosis pilaris much less unsightly.

      If you go on the American Academy of Dermatology web pages, you will get the best treatment ideas that you can discuss with your dermatologist.

      The products I described above are available over the counter other than the anti-biotic.

      You condition is harmless, not contagious and not infectious, so don't worry. Just treat it to make it look better for your own happiness.

  13. QUESTION:
    Can you be a model with keratosis pilaris?
    I've had keratosis since I was child which has made me feel like i have the most disgusting skin in the world so I never thought I could be a model because of it, but everyone always tells me I should be a model and i wish i could but over my skin it makes me think i can't, does anyone know anything about this?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self
      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

  14. QUESTION:
    Relieving keratosis pilaris?
    I have it all over my arms and it's made me really self conscious of my arms. I moisturise them every now and then and it helps a bit but not massively. It's a bit red and looks awful :(
    I know that you can't exactly cure it but I would be very grateful for any suggestions to make it less noticeable. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris, or KP, is a common skin condition. The disease shows up as small bumps on the skin that give the appearance of chicken skin. Almost half of the population is afflicted with this disease, according to Dr. Audrey Kunin of the DermaDoctor website. Most of the bumps form on the upper arms, back of thighs and the buttocks. KP is harmless and is not contagious, but in some cases the symptoms are severe. KP has no cure, but treatments often help. To keep the symptoms at bay, treatments must continue, or the bumps will reoccur.

      try this

      Things You'll Need

      Lemon oil
      Green tea oil
      Moisturizers
      Baking soda
      Salt

      Instructions

      1
      Use several products. KP "responds best to a multi-therapeutic approach," says Dr. Kunin. The approach to KP is to exfoliate, lubricate and use anti-inflammatory products.

      2
      Exfoliate the skin. When you exfoliate, you remove the dead skin cells on the surface of the skin and also deep clean the pores. Scrubs are good exfoliants. Baking soda is a good homemade exfoliant, especially when combined with water to form a paste. A paste made from salt and water is another good scrub. Commercial scrubbers, such as St. Ives Apricot Scrub, are a good choice.

      3
      Use vitamin A capsules. A derivative of vitamin A called retinol is used to treat KP. The Mayo Clinic says that retinols are used for "promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle." For a more natural form of vitamin A, break open a capsule and squeeze the oil onto the skin.

      4
      Use alpha hydroxy acids. There are natural acids that are mild. The lactic acid found in milk and yogurt gently exfoliates the skin. Applying these substances to the affected areas will deep clean and smooth the bumps of KP. Glycolic acid is made of fruit acids and is a popular skincare product. You can buy glycolic acid from skincare centers or online. You can also buy lotions and creams that have glycolic acid as the main ingredient.

      5
      Moisturize your skin. Moisturizers soften the skin and the KP bumps. Lemon oil has citric acid that also helps to exfoliate the skin. Green tea oil is recommended for KP by Dr. Kunin. Green tea has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Camellia oil has vitamins useful to the skin, such as A, B and E. Cocoa butter is made of vegetable oil and deeply penetrates the skin, so it is an excellent moisturizer. Commercial lotions from Jergens, Vaseline Intensive Care and Lubriderm are good for hydrating the skin.

  15. QUESTION:
    Keratosis PIlaris?
    I guess I have self diagnosed what is on my arms. Through reading a variety of online articles, I think I have Keratosis Pilaris on my upper arms and even on my forearms. I have heard about it on the upper arms, but not on the forearms before. Does anyone have any ideas on how to get rid of the redness or even reduce it?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a very common but not-so-easy to treat condition of the skin. Most dermatologists recommend moisturizers used on a frequent basis with the idea that the pores which are impacted will soften and eventually open up. Some common over-the-counter moisturizers you can try are cetaphil or eucerin. Try not to squeeze them - and if they get red and appear to be filled with pus you may have a case of folliculitis going on which would require antibiotics. Try using simple moisturizers several times a day, especially after showering and before bed - if this doesn't work you may want to see a dermatologist.

  16. QUESTION:
    how do you treat keratosis pilaris???
    HELP? they are on my cheeks! i hate them they are very noticeable and they look disgusting!

    • ANSWER:
      HI Anastasia

      Here are a few testimonials that healed the issue.

      APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
      7/5/2007: Elaine from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia writes: "I have Keratosis Pilaris and I have read on how ACV can help this condition I have. I have tried oil pulling with sunflower oil for the last 3 months but I dont see much improvement with my keratosis condition. However, having tried applying ACV on my skin for only the last 3 days I can see improvements already! However, I need to know what is the RIGHT way of consuming ACV for health benefits, be it for skin conditions or even for weight loss. There seems to be too many methods of consuming ACV here, so Im kinda confused :( Thanks!"

      4/19/2007: Julie from Sacramento, CA, USA writes: "I have had keratosis pilaris for many years. I tried apple cider vinegar as suggested and I am amazed at the results. Its only been 4 days and the Keratosis is 80% gone. I also noticed that Im not having spastic colon episodes and for the first time in years I am not needed a sleeping pill to get to sleep

      **Another idea that is very effective for any skin issue.

      'OIL PULLING
      12/17/2006: K from ... writes, "Oil pulling cured keratosis pilaris, coated tongue, ear wax greatly diminished, softer skin, sounder sleep, white teeth, pinker gums and tongue, reduced menopause symptoms. 'I have been oil pulling for 4 1/2 months. I pull for 20 minutes with organic coconut oil. Keratosis Pilaris has no known medical cure. I will oil pull for the rest of my life."

      http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1030891#i

      Best of health to you

  17. QUESTION:
    How can you treat Keratosis pilaris? plz?
    PLEASE HELP ME!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a disorder of hyperkeratosis. It is a very common benign, condition that manifests as folliculocentric keratotic papules in characteristic areas of the body.

      There is currently no cure but there are therapies used to help the condition including:
      - prevention of skin dryness by using appropriate soaps
      - emollients, lactic acid, tretinoin cream (Retin A), alpha-hydroxy acid lotions, urea cream, salicylic acid, and topical steroids
      - medium potency steroid cream

      Please ocnsult your dermatologist as they should be able to provide you with an appropriate treatment regimen as mentioned about.

      Here is an emedicine article describing the condition, treatment, etc.
      http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic211.htm

      Hope this helps

  18. QUESTION:
    Has anyone cured there Keratosis Pilaris out there?
    I want to know if anyone has actually got rid of it through home remedy, prescription, diet, or actions, and not by age, not by growing out of it. I'm actively trying to cure myself.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      Q:Are there any effective treatments for keratosis pilaris?
      A:
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin disorder. Although it isn't serious, it can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs most often in children. It results from the buildup of a protein called keratin in the openings of hair follicles in the skin. This produces small, rough patches ? usually on the arms, thighs and face. The exact cause isn't known, but it may be associated with eczema.

      Keratosis pilaris typically causes no pain or itching. Treatment is directed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin and may include medicated creams containing urea or lactic acid. Even with treatment, this condition tends to remain for years. If associated with eczema, keratosis pilaris may improve with treatment of the underlying eczema.

      betamethasone dipropionate, Diprosone, Diprolene
      chloroxine-shampoo, Capitrol
      corticosteroids-topical
      desoximetasone-topical, Topicort, Topicort LP
      fluocinolone-topical oil, Derma-Smoothe/FS
      fusidic acid/hydrocortisone-topical
      halobetasol-topical, Ultravate
      hydrocortisone valerate, Westcort
      omega-3 fatty acids-oral, Coromega, Longs Fish Oil, Max Epa, Omega-3, Salmon Oil, Superepa
      pimecrolimus, Elidel
      pramoxine-hydrocortisone-cream, ointment, Enzone, Pramosone
      pramoxine-hydrocortisone-lotion, Pramosone, Zone-A
      tacrolimus ointment, Protopic
      tea tree oil-topical

  19. QUESTION:
    I think i've got Keratosis Pilaris! How can i treat it?
    i've had these little bumps on my upper arm since i was around 8 and they havent gone since.. i am 15 now.. i think its Keratosis Pilaris..

    What can i do to treat it?

    Any advice and help is appreciated =]

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      What are the aims of this leaflet?
      This leaflet has been written to help you understand more about keratosis pilaris. It tells you what it is, what causes it, what can be done about it, and where you can find out more about it.

      What is keratosis pilaris?
      Keratosis pilaris is a very common and completely harmless skin condition. In the population as a whole, keratosis pilaris may affect as many as one person in three. Its name gives some idea of what it is. ?Keratosis? means that there is too much keratin ? which makes up the tough horny outer layer of the skin: ?pilaris? comes from the Latin for hair (pilus). In keratosis pilaris, many small (1 to 2 mm. across) horny plugs can be seen blocking the hair follicles on the upper and outer parts of the arms and thighs.

      What causes keratosis pilaris?
      Keratosis pilaris is an inherited skin condition, running strongly in many families, sometimes with a generally dry skin (ichthyosis). The way it is inherited varies from family to family, but often fits into an ?autosomal dominant? pattern ? which means that there will be a 1 in 2 chance that each child of an affected parent will inherit the condition. Keratosis pilaris appears when extra keratin accumulates in the hair follicles. This is usually in childhood, and most obvious during adolescence, often it clears in adulthood. It tends to be better in the summer than in the winter. Keratosis pilaris is harmless, and is not infectious.

      Is keratosis pilaris hereditary?
      Yes, see above.

      What are the symptoms of keratosis pilaris?
      Some people find their keratosis pilaris ugly. The skin feels rough or spiky as though it has permanent goose bumps. Occasionally keratosis pilaris is itchy.

      What does keratosis pilaris look like?
      The groups of small horny bumps are most common on the backs of the upper arms and on the fronts of the thighs. Sometimes keratosis pilaris also affects the back and chest and, in less common forms, the face and eyebrows as well. Some redness may appear around the small spiky bumps. If a plug is pulled off, a fine coiled-up hair may be found inside it.

      How will keratosis pilaris be diagnosed?
      There are no specific tests for keratosis pilaris, however your doctor will recognise it easily and a biopsy is seldom needed.

      Can keratosis pilaris be cured?
      No, but often it does clear up during adult life.

      How can keratosis pilaris be treated?
      No treatment clears keratosis pilaris satisfactorily, and ordinary emollients (moisturisers) are of limited benefit. Creams containing salicylic acid, lactic acid and/or urea are sometimes felt to be more effective. Several simple types can be bought or obtained on prescription, and there is no advantage to be gained from using expensive cosmetic or vitamin creams. In many cases it may be best to wait for the problem to improve on its own.

      What can I do?
      General measures to reduce skin dryness may help:
      Use mild soaps.
      Apply moisturisers frequently.
      Have tepid showers rather than hot baths.
      The use of an abrasive pad may sometimes be of help.

      Where can I get more information about keratosis pilaris?
      Web links to detailed leaflets:
      www.emedicine.com/derm/topic211.htm

      The British Skin Foundation fund vital research into all skin diseases. To find out how you can help, please visit the British Skin Foundation website here.

      (While every effort has been made to ensure that the information given in this leaflet is accurate, not every treatment will be suitable or effective for every person. Your own doctor will be able to advise in greater detail)
      BRITISH ASSOCIATION OF DERMATOLOGISTS
      PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET
      PRODUCED MARCH 2008

      Hope this will help....good luck

  20. QUESTION:
    How to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 15 and I've had these little red bumps all over the backs o my arms and now they are kinda in my thighs. I've had them my whole life, or as long as I can remember. I HATE THEM. I get teased enough. What are some ways to get rid of te bumps?? Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.
      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have this non harmful skin condition on most parts of my arms and legs, called Keratosis Pilaris, if you didn't know? they're rough bumps on dry parts of your body, kinda like pimples.
    I've tried to moisturize those specific areas frequently, and tried a body scrub, but those haven't worked?
    I don't like the feel of these bumps or even the look of them, if anyone knows how to treat them and what with it would be much appreciated!
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Try an acne cream that contains 5% or 10% Benzoyl Peroxide (for example OXY and Clearsill).
      Keratosis Pilaris is an inflamation of the hair follicles - so this helps.

      P.S- and this is not a "must", use a good cleaning soap, I really recommend Neutrogena's solid bar of soap for acne prone skin (the white box with the orange cross).

  22. QUESTION:
    how do i treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    i'm 14 and i just found out that the little white bumps on my arms, cheeks, and, embarisingly, butt, are a condition called keratosis pilaris. i don't have a lot of money to spend on treatments, probably at most. is there anything i can do on my own to get rid of the bumps?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay i know basically everything about Keratosis Pilaris. KP (chicken skin) is a skin disorder passed down from genetics which disappears at the age of +30. half of the worlds population suffers and had suffered from KP. unfortunately KP can NOT be cure but CAN be treated. 1. never pick, itch, squeese, or touch KP because it will bleed. 2. let your affected skin breathe air so dont cover your skin. 3. cleanse ur skin with a loofah sponge. 4. apply lotion such as amlactin or try the dermadocter KP duty cream () or use the dermadocter scrub wash () 5. let ur skin see sunlight. 6.be proud of it because ur not alone. i also (14) have KP and .....acne =,= crap.....and they are everywhere..butt.cheek.arms.legs.back. but dont worry :D people who are good people would never mind these little flaws and wont really care.

  23. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris. Is there anything I can do to treat it?
    I tried Lac Hydrin. It did nothing.

    • ANSWER:
      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

      Although self-help measures won't cure keratosis pilaris, they may help improve the appearance of your skin. You may find these measures beneficial:

      Be gentle when washing your skin. Vigorous scrubbing or removal of the plugs may only irritate your skin and aggravate the condition.
      After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on the skin.
      Apply the moisturizing lotion or lubricating cream while your skin is still moist from bathing. Choose a moisturizer that contains urea or propylene glycol, chemicals that soften dry, rough skin.
      Apply an over-the-counter product that contains lactic acid twice daily. Lactic acid helps remove extra keratin from the surface of the skin.
      Use a humidifier to add moisture to the air inside your home. Low humidity dries out your skin.

  24. QUESTION:
    How to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    Any treatments store brought or home remedies for KP. Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      I have Keratosis Pilaris too and although this won't cure your condition, it will help clear it up. It's called Lac-Hydrin 12% and it looks like this: http://www.ichthyosis.com/images/lac-hydrin.jpg

      I'm pretty sure that you can get some at a local Walgreens. Luckily for me, I went to my dermatologist and he gave me a huge bag full of samples!

      I hope this helps!

  25. QUESTION:
    what can you do to treat keratosis pilaris?
    i know i've read and went to a dr. about this.. and they said.. keratois pilaris is not harmful.. but i have a severe case in which my arms and back have the bumps all over. and its really ugly on my apperance.. and its gotta worse the past few years.. what da hell is going on? .. is there really a way to treat this? i feel like is so unfair to have that

    • ANSWER:
      While there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, there are palliative treatments available. The efficacy of these treatment methods is directly related to the individual's commitment and consistency of use.

      Creams containing the acid form of vitamin A, Tretinoin, have been shown to help. Most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, it is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, decreasing the amount of the keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. While keratosis pilaris is not acne, some believe this action may be of benefit to those with KP as well.

      Another retinoid that has the potential to help with keratosis pilaris is Adapalene. Benefits include increased stability when applied in conjunction with other topical medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Adapalene is a moderator of cellular differentiation, keratinization, and inflammatory processes, having both exfoliating and anti-inflammatory effects

  26. QUESTION:
    I have been told that I have keratosis pilaris.. what is the best way to treat this.?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition commonly seen on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. The skin cells that normally flake off as a fine dust from the skin form plugs in the hair follicles. These appear as small pimples that have a dry ''sandpaper'' feeling. They are usually white but sometimes rather red. They usually don't itch or hurt.

      Keratosis pilaris is particularly common in teenagers on the upper arms. It may occur in babies where it tends to be most obvious on the cheeks. It may remain for years but generally gradually disappears usually before age 30. Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. It is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out, and may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is It Keratosis Pilaris?
    i have little white bumps on my upper arms, stomach and a bit of my lower back... the bumps are slightly raised.

    do milk baths help get rid/reduse its appearance?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

  28. QUESTION:
    What can i do to treat keratosis pilaris?
    bumps on the back of the arms

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  29. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris????`?
    Heyy everyone i am 15 years old and i have these little red bumbs on the back of my arms and my legs. People are saying its KP and i belive it is too. Does anyone know what kind of lotion i should get to treat this?? please help me

    thanks,

    • ANSWER:
      HI Jessica

      Here are a few testimonials that healed the issue.

      APPLE CIDER VINEGAR
      7/5/2007: Elaine from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia writes: "I have Keratosis Pilaris and I have read on how ACV can help this condition I have. I have tried oil pulling with sunflower oil for the last 3 months but I dont see much improvement with my keratosis condition. However, having tried applying ACV on my skin for only the last 3 days I can see improvements already! However, I need to know what is the RIGHT way of consuming ACV for health benefits, be it for skin conditions or even for weight loss. There seems to be too many methods of consuming ACV here, so Im kinda confused :( Thanks!"

      4/19/2007: Julie from Sacramento, CA, USA writes: "I have had keratosis pilaris for many years. I tried apple cider vinegar as suggested and I am amazed at the results. Its only been 4 days and the Keratosis is 80% gone. I also noticed that Im not having spastic colon episodes and for the first time in years I am not needed a sleeping pill to get to sleep

      Best of health to you

  30. QUESTION:
    What lotions work best to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I've heard Lac Hydrin Five works well, but I wanted to know my other options. Has anyone had any good results using a particular product?

    • ANSWER:
      Well Keratosis pilaris will never go away. Its a chronic condition. Using Lac-Hydrin is the best cream to help the appearance. Basically smooths out the skin. i don't know of a better treatment.

  31. QUESTION:
    What do I use to treat Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin)?
    I have "chicken skin" and I was wondering if there is any skin products that would help get my skin smooth and flawless and get rid of this chicken skin! Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily. Read here for more information.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  32. QUESTION:
    how do i treat redness from keratosis pilaris?
    I've searched a hundred different treatments to use on keratosis pilaris and all of them are only for whiteheads and bumps. Frankly, I couldn't care less about the bumps. What I want to know is how to get rid of the redness, it's really all that people notice.

    I am currently using Bio-Oil and Uremol 20 on the backs of my arms, I haven't been using them very long but I am reading everywhere that these only work for reducing the size of the bumps, not the redness. If someone could give me an alternative (preferably a cheap one) I would greatly appreciate it. I'm going to England in less than a week and would like to look my best for my birthday. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      WebMd says this:

      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually improves before age 30 in most cases. [Mine did.] Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as AmLactin or LadHydrin can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      * Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      * Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing and exfoliating the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush [That's for the bumps you care less about]

      Back to just-plain-me again. Usually redness is the result of irritation, which can be caused by friction--scrubbing too much, for instance--or dryness. What I'd do is seek out a heavy-duty moisturizer and use it multiple times a day on affected areas, and to wash the affected skin only with suds and my hands, no washcloth.

      Between the two, a week is enough to see some improvement. Beats waiting until your 30s, huh?

  33. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?
    Hi, I've had keratosis pilaris since I was a baby. My doctor says there is no cure; she only gave me a lotion called AmLactin, which is helping but not making a big difference. I really need to cute this fast! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same thing. My doctor recommended Amlactin as well but gave very specific instructions. He said that the first day you use it, leave it on for one hour then wash off. On day two leave the lotion on for two hours then wash it off. On day three leave it on for three hours then wash it off and so on until after day eight. After day eight, apply thin (not too much!!) layers of lotion to your affected area 2 to 4 times a day. My doctor said that Amlactin is only effective for keratosis pilaris if you build your self up to it gradually, then maintain it. Good Luck!

  34. QUESTION:
    Natural ways to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I have some KP on my upper arms and thighs
    i would like to know how to treat ,
    some say baby oils,lotion...etc

    • ANSWER:
      I have yet to find a natural way.When Keratosis flares, it goes away if you don't pick. If you don't pick at them they won't get infected. Use Amlactin twice a day. Buy at Eckerd or other drugstore. I haven't broke out for almost a year. I was told by a doctor eventually it will stop permanently. If you get one or two bumps just use hot water to speed up healing process. BUT DON'T BURN YOUR SKIN. Keep skin healthy drinking at least 8 cups water a day.

  35. QUESTION:
    Keratosis pilaris?
    i am almost positive that i do not have Keratosis pilaris. i have skin to white colored bumps all over my arms and everytime i pop one of them, white stuff leaks out. i have been told that it is KP but after doing some research, other than my little sister, no one in my family has it and in KP i thought that there were hairs inside the bumps. please help. how can i treat this. i pick and pop them and then i have ugly scarred arms
    i dont want information about KP i know i dont have it!
    but thank you for your answer

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for keratosis pilaris, since KP is a chronic, genetic follicular disease, however treatments are available. Results from treatments vary and can often be disappointing. With persistence, most people will see satisfactory improvement. It is recommended that treatment not be discontinued because the buildup of keratin (the hard protein in the skin, nails, and hair) will continue to reform around the hair follicles.

      http://www.helpforkp.com/

  36. QUESTION:
    Homeopathic ways to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have suffered from this for years! Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi CookFrNW, today is many are effective treatments available and make symptoms Keratosis Pilaris less apparent.
      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated regularly. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid ? a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage.

      Check with a dermatologist or family doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the its potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.
      Jason Homan

  37. QUESTION:
    Suggestions on how to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey, if anyone else has Keratosis Pilaris, maybe you could give me some advice. I have KP on my arms, thighs, shoulders, etc. It wouldn't bother me as much if there wasn't so much scarring; but I have been scratching the affected areas for quite a while, and now there are scabs/scarring to go along with the KP. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to treat KP fast, like any good exfoliants or creams? Or can anyone relate to this situation?

    • ANSWER:
      kp is hereditary. Half the people in my family have it. If it is KP there should be others in your family that have it . I used Retin-a used to treat acne, when i was a teenager. and a good moisturizer containing aloe, shea butter, and/or vitamin e is best.
      By the time I was 20 it had cleared up a lot, My diet was also a lot better by then as well.

      I have no problem now... some people keep it ,mine went away.. good luck

  38. QUESTION:
    How to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    The other name for it is Chicken Skin. It's a common skin condition. I put this in Polls & Surveys to get more responses from a general category. For anyone who knows how to treat or reduce the appearance of it please help. Serious answers please.

    • ANSWER:
      YES Im not the only person who has this!

      No treatment clears keratosis pilaris satisfactorily, and ordinary emollients (moisturizers) are of limited benefit. Creams containing salicylic acid, lactic acid and/or urea are sometimes felt to be more effective. Several simple types can be bought or obtained by prescription, or over the counter, and there is no advantage to be gained from using expensive cosmetic or vitamin creams.

      * Use mild soaps or gentle body washes.

      * Apply moisturizers frequently -- For better absorption, apply to the skin while it's still moist after showering.

      * Take tepid showers rather than hot baths.

      * Light exfoliation with an abrasive pad may sometimes be of help, however scrubbing the areas of KP is not recommended, and can worsen the condition.

      * Keeping areas of KP exfoliated with a Salicylic Acid or AHA based lotion works best.

  39. QUESTION:
    how to treat kertosis pilaris? on arms?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil?
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre?
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co?

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles?

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You could make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc? And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3?s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3?s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 ? 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-?

      Hope this helps!

  40. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey I have this thing called keratosis pilaris. Does anybody have this and have any solutions on treating it????

    • ANSWER:
      i have that too on my legs - my mom has it so I guess its genetic, but I have no idea on how to treat. I'm so used to it now except when young kids ask me whats wrong with my legs.


how to treat keratosis pilaris

Foot Fungus Medication

There was a belief a long time ago that ringworm was caused by a worm and hence the name, but it is not caused by a worm. It is a fungus which causes infection of the skin. This fungus lives and spreads on the skin's top layer and also on the hair. It grows well in warm areas that are moist like in skin folds, locker rooms and in swimming pools.

Personal skin touching between one person and another or between animals and even between a person and an animal will very rapidly spread the fungus as it is extremely contagious. The sharing of personal clothes and sports items or any item that has had contact with the skin is a vehicle for spreading the condition.

It will cause a very itchy rash and will sometimes make a ring-shaped pattern. When this infection is in the hands it will make the skin thick, scaly and dry. The skin in between the fingers will be damp and will have open sores.

As a preventative measure do not share personal items like towels, your sports gear and equipment, your clothes and your bedding with anyone. Wash your clothes with hot water which has had an anti fungal soap added as soon as you think that you have been infected with the fungus. Wear foot covering like sandals or something like slippers whenever you are in a public shower room or in a locker room. Whenever you are involved in a contact sport, ensure that you wash your skin and hair thoroughly to avoid infection. Your body should be dried completely after taking a bath or shower and your feet should be dried last.

You should try to wear loose fitting cotton clothes. Change your underwear and your socks on a daily basis. If you suffer from athlete's foot, put your socks on before you put on your underwear to prevent the spread of fungi from your feet to your groin region. If your pet has areas of hair missing it could be a sign of a fungus infection and you should take care by taking him or her to a vet as soon as possible. You can get the fungus infection from animals however it is not very common.

To make an effective diagnosis, a medical practitioner will take scrapings from the rash area and will microscopically try to identify and recognize the fungus. Other tests like culture tests will also be done to confirm the diagnosis as well as to find a suitable treatment.

The rash or sores can often be home treated with creams and lotions that can be acquired from your pharmacist without the need of a prescription. Once treatment has started, the rash should disappear soon thereafter. Use the cream as directed to prevent the re-infection of your skin. Prescription medication is available if the lotions and creams do not work. If this condition is not treated at all, blisters will form and the cracks may become infected. Once this occurs, you will need to be given antibiotics.

If anyone in your family or close to you has an indication of ringworm, it is essential to find a treatment for them immediately to ensure that the other people in your circle do not contract the condition.



foot fungus medication

How To Treat Fungus On Feet

If you notice your toenails turning yellow, this could be the first sign of toenail infection. Small blisters on the soles or scaling of the skin between the toes indicate athlete's foot. It is a good idea to try home remedies like tea tree oil, vinegar or oregano oil at this stage.

Athlete's foot attacks the soles of the feet and the area between the toes whereas onychomycosis is found predominantly under the nail bed. If your feet remain packed in non absorbent socks and cramped shoes, it makes an ideal place for the fungi to grow. These parasites may find their place under your toenails and between the toes if you don't maintain good hygiene and if you are in regular contact with surfaces like gym floors and swimming pools.

Getting rid of the above problems in the very initial stages is of critical importance because if you leave them untreated, these may aggravate into painful and embarrassing conditions. It may cause your toenails to disintegrate or there might be pus with foul odor secreted from the crevices between the toes - and worse, these infections may spread to other parts of the body.

Beyond this point, you must go for tablets or antifungal creams, the latter being safer as there are no side effects like skin and liver damage. There is a variety of over the counter medications available to combat both infections.

One must bear in mind that even the fastest treatment will be somewhere between a few weeks and a few months because you must make sure that the infection is completely eliminated before you discontinue the treatment. Even the slightest remains can bring the infection back and it may be worse than before.

Funginix is a trusted toenail fungus treatment which comes with the goodness of natural ingredients, all of which are powerful antifungal agents and also soothe your skin. More than 90% users have reported complete cure and no reoccurrence of the infection even after months of discontinuing the treatment. Read more about how to get rid of toenail fungus



how to treat fungus on feet

Toenail Fungus Remedies

Catching ugly toenail fungus is not hard. Getting rid of the microscopic bacteria, if left untreated can be almost impossible without a Doctor's intervention. If you act fast, some easy toenail fungus home remedies can help relieve the problem in a short time.

For fifteen minutes each day, soak the affected toe in a mixture of apple cider vinegar and warm water. If needed, you can soak the nail several times per day as more treatments may help. The vinegar will help to stop the growth of the fungus.

Tea tree oils are known to treat many skin problems. Applying it with a cotton ball a few times each day will assist in slowing the fungus. You can also mix it in water and soak your infected nail.

In some cases, mouthwash like listerine can be effective in treating toenail fungus. Each day after showering, soak the toe in a basin with mouthwash diluted with warm water. Antiseptic mouthwash contains Thymol, an active ingredient which is also a known antifungal.

While definitely not a pleasant smelling treatment, garlic works very well. Some home remedies suggest to wear socks to bed that are filled with pieces of garlic cloves. Promote breathing and circulation by using a 100 percent cotton sock.

Administer a tiny bit of vapor rub to the diseased toenail a couple of times each day. Like mouthwash, vapor rubs also have Thymol as an active ingredient but vaporub may cause too much moisture which actually helps fungus to grow between toes. It is also very hard for the rub to get through the protective toenail. However, many people believe that these rubs can be good for toenail fungus.

Mixing hot water and baking soda in a small bowl will eventually form a paste. To kill and dry out the toenail fungus, coat the affected toe with the concoction a couple of times a day. Keep it on the nail for 30 minutes and then wash it off. Be sure to completely dry off your feet afterwards to prevent more fungus from growing.

Once the toenail fungus home remedies have killed the fungus, protect yourself and make sure it stays gone. Walking barefoot around the house and letting your nails air out will help to keep your toes and nails healthy. As mentioned before, wearing cotton socks will allow your skin and toes to breath and have air to stop excess sweat and fungus growth.

Toenail Fungus Home Remedies to eliminate ugly Toenail Fungus fast.



toenail fungus remedies

Toenail Fungus Treatments

The basic premise behind this odd sounding natural toenail fungus treatment is to soften nails with beer, create an acidic environment with vinegar which is beneficial to good bacteria and deadly to fungus and then penetrate nails with specific beneficial bacteria to help kill and prevent further recurrences.

Essential Ingredients:

Acidophilus Sachets containing a specific strain of 125 billion organisms.

Guiness Stout beer or any other dark beer (Guiness is the one proven to work).

White Vinegar

Basin big enough for your feet or hands

Time

Persistence and Consistency

Natural Toenail Fungus Treatment Procedure:

In tub, pour 1 liter of room temperature beer into a basin

Add 1/2 a sachet which is 60 billion acidophilus and other strains.

Add 1 liter of White vinegar

Soak clean feet in the solution for 30 minutes before bed or when best for you.

On removing your feet or fingernails from the basin, file the nails down with a pumice stone or file

After each 3rd day, toss out the entire solution mixture and remake using the formula: 1 liter of white vinegar, 1 liter of dark beer and the remaining half of one sachet. This keeps the solution's ingredients in active live form. If too old, it will not work.

Repeat for 30 days every day. Do not skip a day for best results.

Do twice a day for faster results

What to look for:
As fungus gets killed by this natural toenail fungus treatment, you will notice new nail growth from the nail base coming in clear. This is a good sign. Some people see clearing at the base within one week and some people see clearing at the base in one month. It all depends on how fast your nails grow and how often you soak them.

Make sure you do this toenail fungus treatment daily. Make it a routine. Watch some TV, read a book or wash the dishes for 30 minutes.

If you know your nails grow slowly, then consider MSM or Silicea 6x cell salts as they have shown to increase nail growth.

This anti-fungal protocol is an excellent way to help prevent liver damage via Lamisil.

I estimated the total cost of this procedure to be about 0.00 That is very inexpensive compared to Lamisil - and much healthier to your liver.

Even if you drink a couple Guiness Stout while you do the soak - it may still be safer than Lamisil on your liver. :)

I have had over 42,000 people read this information and a decent percentage email me. It is great to hear that this treatment is working well.

I had one elderly woman with long term fungal toenails report excellent results.

She also had an unexpected benefit: her plantar warts fell out from the bottom of her feet allowing her to walk comfortably for the first time in years.

Give it a shot - it is safe, effective, inexpensive. Yes it takes some work, but popping a liver toxic Lamisil pill for 3 months daily also takes work - especially repairing the damaged liver. You only get one liver.

An immunology professor, Dr Sheryl Berman, PhD, did a study on about 35 different acidophilus companies and found that only one had the actual amount of live bacteria it claimed in the container - some of the companies stated 1 billion live bacteria per capsule and contained...none. The sachets that I provide claim 125 billion per sachet and at manufacturing have 170 billion.

Choosing a different dark beer that is less expensive may hinder your success. I have not had reports of other effective dark beers so I am not sure. You can give it a shot but you are only saving a few bucks while investing 30 days of soaking. That is pennies per day extra. Worth the risk? If you have time, it would be good to know if the others worked...if they do, let me know :)

You may find the link to the Acidophilus Sachets below in the Resource Box- along with the MSM and Silicea cell salt.

Should you have questions, please comment. I'm here to answer them and help your nails recover!

Enjoy healthy nails once again! It's summer - put on those sandals!

Dr Ben, ND

Please note: Fungus is due to either a weak immune system, trauma to the nail area, high refined carbohydrate diet or recent or long term use of antibiotics.

That said, taking one sachet in a glass of water before dinner for 14 days helps restore healthy gut bacteria which likely has a direct impact on proper immune function, may help combat fungus internally and externally long term and reduce refined carbohydrate and sugar cravings as the 'bad' bacteria which do crave sugar will be wiped out by the beneficial bacteria. So taking the sachets internally for one week, soaking for a few months, changing your diet, building your immune system and not bashing your nails will likely improve your fungus situation.

A mild headache may occur while taking the sachets internally. Taking vitamin C usually helps. The headache is usually due to the 'die-off' reaction from unhealthy bacteria being killed by the healthy pro biotic found in the sachets.



toenail fungus treatments

Ointment For Itching

Pavement damaged and wrinkled skin laser is very effective way to create a smoother skin with a better texture. Since the laying of the laser is really strong and burn it on the face of significant maintenance and little heavy. It is worth noting, a bit psychologically disturbing, as you can see my face during the first week after treatment. Care is needed depends on the degree of laser-laying depth. In general, if the procedure was performed when operating under anesthesia in the form then it is likely that the laser DEEP making and the list of instructions to apply. In office-based laser-laying, it is either a light or medium depth levels and the treatment is much faster and without the extensive care needs.

1) Keep all treated areas covered with Aquaphor ointment regularly. Clean the wound gently Cetaphil face with soap and cold water every six hours or so, the first two days and then twice daily thereafter.

2) Aquaphor ointment should be applied liberally to keep treated areas moist. T he formation of scabs is not desirable. If they appear, this is because either there is not enough oil is used or is not applied often enough. If the scabs seem to rub, to choose, or rub off any of them.

3) drink more fluids, the better your skin will heal. Try to drink 80-10 ounces of fluid every two to three hours during the first week after surgery.

4) You should continue to take oral antibiotics (eg, Kelfex) within 7 days after surgery.

5) If the area around the mouth have been treated, you should continue to antiviral drugs (eg, acyvlovir) 5 days after surgery.

6) Take the pain pills (eg, Vicodin), as indicated.

7) You may experience mild itching 3-7 days after surgery. Ice packs applied gently on the treated areas during the first day or two after surgery will reduce the most itchy. For more severe itching, you can try over-the-counter Benadryl 30 mg every six hours. (This will make you drowsy, so no driving)

8) When the skin has healed (7-8 days), apply your normal moisturizer liberally to the treated areas for the next few weeks to keep it from getting dry.

9) No make-up to 7-10 days after surgery. Mineral-based foundation is recommened and conceal redness and skin sensitivity during the first month.

10) Avoid direct sunlight during the first month after surgery. The skin is very sensitive during this early stage of treatment. After the first week after surgery, wear sunprotection (SPF 30 or higher) for the next three months, when exposed to sunlight.



ointment for itching

Acetonide Cream Usp

USP natural progesterone refers to the progesterone substance that is exactly the same hormone that is made by the human body. USP natural progesterone is not the same as the 'progestins' that are synthetic versions of progesterone sold by the pharmaceutical companies.

For example, progestins are associated with birth defects while progesterone is necessary for a healthy pregnancy. Since progesterone is a natural hormone, the body is able to produce it, use it and get rid of it as needed. Progestins, on the other hand, are not processed very well by the body and often create undesirable side effects.

The term 'USP' refers to the grade or purity of the product and is the shortened form of the term 'United States Pharmacopia'. There are three different grades of raw materials used in products - 'USP pharmaceutical grade', 'food grade' for human consumption and 'feed grade' that is for animal consumption.

The difference between grades is one of quality and purity, and a substance that is labeled USP pharmaceutical grade will be of the highest quality and purity. The USP natural progesterone used for hormone replacement comes from plant fats and oils, most often a substance called 'diosgenin', which is extracted from a very specific type of wild yam that grows in Mexico.

Harvard-trained physician Dr. John R. Lee has written extensively about the vital role progesterone plays in human health in his book What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Menopause. According to Dr. Lee, the most convenient and effective form of USP natural progesterone to use is natural progesterone cream that can be absorbed through the skin. Natural progesterone cream should contain 2-3% USP natural progesterone by volume or 450-500mg per ounce of cream.

Natural progesterone replacement therapy should be done in the manner that re-creates what your body would produce were it ovulating, both in the timing and amount of natural progesterone used. You want to 'time' the usage to be the same as it would be in your regular monthly menstrual cycle.

How much USP natural progesterone should you use? Most natural progesterone supplement packaging gives specific usage instructions, but using 1/4 teaspoon once or twice a day for 2-3 weeks a month will simulate normal progesterone presence in the body. This means that about 1/4 teaspoon daily would provide about 20 mg/day. However, Dr. Lee recommends that women not use higher than the recommended dosage to avoid hormone imbalances. More is not better when it comes to hormone balance.

When do you use it? For premenopausal women, Dr. Lee recommends about 15-24 mg per day for 14 days before expected menses, stopping the day or so before your period begins. For postmenopausal women, Dr. Lee suggests the dose that often works well is 15 mg per day for 25 days of each calendar month.

Where do you apply USP natural progesterone cream? Natural progesterone cream is easily absorbed through the skin. From the fat layer just under the skin, progesterone is absorbed into capillary blood. Absorption is best at the skin sites where humans blush such as the face, neck, chest, breasts, inner arms and palms of the hands.

Learn as much as you can about the crucial role that natural progesterone plays in health and the problems related to progesterone deficiency. Understand the reasons for considering natural hormone replacement therapy instead of using synthetic hormones. With concerns about the unpleasant and dangerous side effects associated with synthetic hormones, more and more women are looking to natural progesterone and estrogen supplementation and physician-recommended natural treatments for dealing with hormone imbalance.

Copyright 2006 InfoSearch Publishing



acetonide cream usp

Eczema And Pimples

Eczema is an illness whose symptoms include itching, redness, flaking skin, small pimples on the neck, forehead and cheek, and rough skin. Many people treat eczema using home remedies. There are medicinal treatment for eczema in children and babies. The problem of using medicines for baby eczema treatment is that the symptoms relapse after the medicines are stopped.

1. Oatmeal Bath: This is another great way of eczema relief for your little child. Grind some oats in the blender and put it into a muslin tea bag. Place this tea bag into the warm bath water of your child in order to ease off the excessive itching sensation. However, do not give a long bath to your child.

2. Take your zinc. Zinc has been shown to benefit the skin in general and eczema in particular. Purchase a zinc supplement and follow the manufacturer's recommendations for daily use.

3. The following are vitamins known to be helpful with skin health. Don't just supplement, try including more foods high in these vitamins and minerals along with supplementing. Vitamin A:15 milligrams, Vitamin C: Take 500 milligrams 3 times a day for a total of 1500 milligrams a day, Vitamin E: 700 International Units a day, Zinc: 15 milligrams a day for women and 20 milligrams a day for men.

4. Epsom Salt - Epsom salts help remove dead skin from the surface of eczema. Use in warm bath water and soak your body in the solution. Apply natural oils afterwards for best results.

5. Petroleum Jelly: To keep the skin in a well moisturized condition, petroleum jelly is the best option available with you. Most of the body lotions that are available in the market contain fragrance and other irritants which are not suitable for your child. Apply the jelly soon after the bath when the skin is still not completely dry. You should apply it thrice a day for best results.

6. Opt for cotton. Clothing made with cotton is easier on eczema-ridden skin than clothes made with synthetic fabrics. Additionally, try to avoid tight clothes, as they can make your symptoms worse.

7. This special oil is an important aid to the health of skin. Eating foods like walnuts, avocados, mackerel and Alaskan tuna are great choices.



eczema and pimples

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail Fungus affects millions of people worldwide and is notoriously difficult to cure. Apart from taking months to completely cure, it is an irritating condition to suffer from. Fortunately, there are some treatments available. These treatments fall into two categories. These are; commercial and home treatments. Commercial treatments are freely available from chemists and supermarkets. No prescription is required and these products have been tried and tested by experts before being sold. These treatments usually come in the form of tablets or creams. Two of the most popular commercial treatments are Lamisil tablets and ClearZal. Lamisil is taken orally and has successfully treated 19 million people worldwide and works well in resistant cases of toenail fungus. Clearzal is a clinically tested topical nail care solution. It is an antimicrobial solution that kills 99% of infections caused by microbes. The disadvantage of commercial products is that they can be expensive and, in some cases, have been shown to cause rare side effects such as liver problems and allergic skin reactions. Many people prefer a home treatment of toenail fungus because there is no need to deal with tablets or the side effects of conventional medication while still retaining fast and effective relief. An example home treatment of toenail fungus is the daily soaking of the affected nail in a solution that will kill the fungus. Common soaking solutions include dilute chlorine bleach, household vinegar, and hydrogen peroxide or Listerine mouthwash. These solutions contain anti-fungal agents in them that should eliminate nail fungus. This solution should be applied daily. Another method is to mix vinegar, tea tree oil, colloidal silver and Vicks vapor rub until they merge into a smooth ointment. After this, make sure you nails are clean and apply this ointment to the top of your affected nail. The best time to do this is after a bath or before you go to sleep at night. Continue to do this daily and you should see an improvement in your condition. The main ingredient in this ointment, tea tree oil, is an extract of the leaves and stems from the tea tree and has been scientifically proven to contain anti-fungal properties. These methods have been used for years in many households and have been very effective in dealing with nail fungus. Using the methods mentioned in this article (commercial or home treatment); you will be on the right track to curing your nail fungus. However, please remember that for the nail fungus to be completely cured - fungus needs to be removed and your nail needs to grow which can take a few months.

toenail fungus treatment