What Is A Psoriasis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Could i have psoriasis?
    Okay so ive noticed the past few days i hae red dots on my legs.. They don't itch but there just kinda there... I have molescum but i donst look like it. Could i have psoriasis?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis occurs in different forms, but you will usually have thickened and red patches of skin. Your skin may feel itchy, and can sometimes feel painful or sore. If you have only very mild symptoms, you may not be aware you have it.
      Some types of psoriasis can affect your scalp and cause redness and flaking. It can also affect your fingernails, which can become pitted, thickened or loosened from the nail bed.
      If you have any of these symptoms, contact your GP

      Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and examine you. He or she may also ask you about your medical history.

      Your GP will probably be able to diagnose psoriasis from your symptoms and a physical examination. However, if your psoriasis is extensive or severe, if it's affecting your education or work, if it's not responding to treatment, or if your diagnosis is uncertain, your GP may refer you to a dermatologist (a doctor who specialises in identifying and treating skin conditions).

      If you have generalised pustular psoriasis or erythrodermic psoriasis, you may need to be admitted to hospital for treatment

      There is no cure for psoriasis. However, there are a number of treatments that can help relieve your symptoms.

      Topical treatments
      Your GP may prescribe you a medicated cream or ointment. The type and strength of topical treatment will depend on the type of psoriasis you have. Common types of preparations include those containing:

      coal tar - these preparations can reduce inflammation and scaling, and are often used in psoriasis affecting your scalp; however, they can be smelly and messy

      steroids - these preparations are often used for localised psoriasis (eg patches on your elbows or knees), but shouldn't be used if your psoriasis is quite widespread; stronger steroids can be used on your palms and soles, or your scalp

      vitamin D derivatives (such as calcipotriol or tacalcitol) - these preparations can be easier to use than some of the other products, but sometimes irritate your skin

      Oral medicines
      If topical treatments don't control your symptoms, or if your psoriasis is extensive, you may be prescribed medicines that you take as tablets, such as:

      methotrexate

      acitretin

      ciclosporin

      hydroxycarbamide

      These medicines work by suppressing your immune system, or by slowing down the production of skin cells. They are prescribed by a dermatologist.

  2. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis...?
    Does anyone know any good home remedies for head to toe psoriasis for my 15 year old daughter? Her body is literally covered from head to toe and the dermatologist has perscribed her a 5.00 medication that we can not afford at this time.

    • ANSWER:
      psoriasis really is heart breaking. I've had it covering my body almost head to toe for the past nine years. My doctor finally found that my psoriasis was due to too much strep in my body. He put me on tetracycline and it has all but completely gone away. Plus tetracycline is only about 10 bucks for a months worth. You might want to go back to the doc and have him run a strep test, this could answer a lot of questions. also, I went to a homeopathic doc for natural solutions. Milk thistle is great, cod liver oil, and biotin all these you can buy at walmart for under each. and they really help. I have also found that smashing a banana and adding warm oatmeat to it, stir it up, and rub your body down with it. Leave on the little flakes and oatmeal stuff on your body, sleep with it. In the morning you will wake up with less spots, I can almost promise!! Good luck and God bless!! I will pray for her. Psoriasis is so horrible

  3. QUESTION:
    tattoo with psoriasis?
    I am getting a tattoo soon from shoulder to elbow. i do have psoriasis but this area does not really flame up, tiny spots of it rarely does occur just lower arms and legs really does have it, i am going to get it , i just wondered if anyone has the same problem ,if any advice can be given. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      In my research in your topic, I came across this article from the National Psoriasis Foundation Forum. This is what one sufferer has to say :

      "When having tattoo done, any injury to the skin can result in something called the Koebner effect. The Koebner effect, which was named after the doctor who first described the phenomenon, basically means that an injury to a previously healthy patch of skin (say from a cat scratch or a shaving cut) can result in a new patch of psoriasis. It can also mean that an injury to an existing patch of psoriasis can cause that existing psoriasis lesion to get worse. Not every injury results in the Koebner effect and not ever psoriasis patient experiences the Koebner effect. I don't experience it, but it sounds like you do. "

      At the same time of research, I also came across a cream product that can help to relief your psoriasis. This is what the product advertised :

      "According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, between 150,000 and 260,000 new cases of Psoriasis are diagnosed each year?amounting to more than 5 million Americans - so you are not alone.

      If you have Psoriasis, getting relief for your skin is a top priority. While there is currently no cure, you can still get relief with a new product being advertised which is made with FDA-approved active ingredient. The product from Revitol Skin Care Product is called Dermasis Psoriasis Cream and it works to help control your skin symptoms in a smooth, non-greasy formula that absorbs quickly?and will not stain your clothes or skin.

      The product unique formulation of ingredients not only soothes and moisturizes your skin, but its active ingredient also helps control the scaling and flaking associated with Psoriasis to help your skin to heal naturally. "

      Hope this info will help you decide on getting the tattoo done as wel as help you to get some medicine to relief your icth, redness and scaling.

      Click on link to get more information on Dermasis Psoriasis Cream

  4. QUESTION:
    Home remedies for psoriasis??
    I have bad scalp psoriasis The OTC shampoos just don't so well for me anymore.One thing I've heard is epsom salt is good for psoriasis. I was thinking about mixing it with my regular shampoo. Has anyone ever tried this? I would appreciate any ideas for getting this stubborn stuff under control!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Natural Home Remedies for Psoriasis
      The discomfort of psoriasis can be relieved or lessened -- and many treatment options include common kitchen items found in your home. Just a little measuring, mixing and applying, and you're on your way to feeling better. Try the following home remedies when psoriasis causes problems.

      Home Remedies from the Cupboard

      Try a vinegar dip. Like aloe, apple cider vinegar has a long history of being used to soothe minor burns and other skin inflammations, and it's also a disinfectant. According to the Psoriasis Foundation, some folks with psoriasis have reported success in using it to treat their condition. As a liquid, it makes a great soak for affected fingernails and toenails -- just pour some in a bowl or cup and dip your nails in for a few minutes -- and apparently has even been effective when applied to plaques using cotton balls. It might just be worth a try. To prepare an apple cider vinegar compress, add 1 cup apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon water. Soak a washcloth in the mixture and apply it to the skin to ease itching.

      Pass the plastic wrap. Doctors have known for years that covering psoriasis lesions helps them go away. The cover-up strategy also helps to work medications into the skin and keep moisturizers in place longer. You can use regular kitchen plastic wrap, or you can buy special OTC patches (Actiderm). Apply your prescribed medication (be sure to confirm with your doctor first that the medication you are using can safely be used with an occlusive wrap) or moisturizer, then cover the area with the wrap. Don't keep the wrap on so long that the skin becomes soggy, since it's more susceptible to secondary infection that way; consult your doctor or pharmacist if you need more specific instructions.

      Pass the warm olive oil. If psoriasis scale is a problem on your scalp, warm a little olive oil and gently massage it into the scale to help soften and remove it. Then shampoo as usual and rinse thoroughly.

      Applying a thin layer of mineral oil will keep the skin moist.

      Applying a thin layer of mineral oil before hitting the beach can help
      enhance the sun's effects and keep the skin moist.

      Baking soda. To take the itch out of your scaly patches, mix 1 1/2 cups baking soda into 3 gallons water. Apply to your itchy patches with a washcloth soaked in the solution.

      Epsom salts. Add a handful of these healing salts to your bath. They'll keep swelling down and bring healing to your psoriasis.

      Mineral oil. This is another time-proven skin soother. Add a bit to your bath and soak your aching skin.

      Olive oil. An old favorite for easing psoriasis outbreaks is mixing 2 teaspoons olive oil with a large glass of milk and adding the concoction to your bathwater. Or if you are dealing with psoriasis on your scalp, massage some warm olive oil on your scaly patches. It will help soften the dead skin and make it easier to remove.

      Plastic wrap. After you douse your patches in moisturizer, wrap them in plastic wrap to help hold the moisture in. Change the wrapping often.

      Vegetable oil. Get in the tub and add a cupful of vegetable oil to your bath to ease your psoriasis.

      Home Remedies from the Spice Rack

      Cayenne. Capsaicin, the substance that gives cayenne pepper its heat, helps relieve pain and itching by blocking the communication system of sensory nerves. And studies have found that a cream containing capsaicin helped relieve itching and got rid of psoriasis plaques. Look for a cream containing .025 to .075 percent capsaicin -- any more than that and you'll risk burning your skin. It takes about a week for the cream to work. It may cause an initial, brief burning sensation when applied to plaques, and it must be kept away from the eyes and mucous membranes because it can produce an intense burning sensation that is certainly irritating. But you may want to try a little capsaicin-containing cream on a small psoriasis lesion to see if it helps.

      Home Remedies from the Supplement Shelf

      Fish oil. There have been numerous studies linking the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil to improvement in psoriasis patches. The people in these studies had to take large oral doses of the supplement to show any results, but one study did find simply slathering fish oil on a psoriasis patch helped with healing. There are also commercial creams available that contain fish oils or derivatives of the oils. Whichever way you decide to use it, if you think fish oil might be worth a try, talk it over with your doctor.

      Home Remedies from the Medicine Cabinet

      Beat the tar out of it. Tar-containing shampoos, creams, and bath additives can help loosen psoriasis scales. Tar-containing bath oils are especially beneficial for psoriasis that is widespread on the body. These over-the-counter (OTC) products have been successful psoriasis treatments for many years.

      Bring on the salicylic acid. You may also want to use "sal acid," as salicylic acid preparations are sometimes called, to remove scales. Shampoos, creams, gels, and other topical psoriasis treatments containing salicylic acid are sold over the counter.

      Try OTC cortisone. Nonprescription topical medications containing 1 percent cortisone (Cortaid is one familiar brand) can also relieve the itching and irritation of psoriasis, especially for plaques that arise in skin folds or on the face. Be sure to get your doctor's OK before using one of these medications, though, and follow the package directions carefully; overuse of topical steroids such as cortisone can cause thinning and easy bruising of the skin.

      Apply aloe. The gel from the aloe vera plant has long been known for its skin-soothing properties and for helping the skin heal from minor wounds and burns. Research in the 1990s appears to have extended the plant's repertoire of possible benefits to include clearing psoriasis plaques. If you want to try aloe, you can buy the plant itself, split open one of its leaves, and smear the gel onto the plaques. For larger areas of plaque or a more portable balm, you can instead purchase a bottle of pure aloe vera gel at many pharmacies and health-food stores.

      Psoriasis is no picnic -- but its discomfort can be eased by preventing outbreaks through minor lifestyle changes and by treating outbreaks with a number of home remedy options, including baking soda, olive oil and mineral oil.

  5. QUESTION:
    psoriasis?!?!?!?
    today, i went to the doctors, because i have disgusting patches of scaly gross looking skin behind my ears, and in my scalp. The doctors told me that i have psoriasis. Does anyone else have it behind their ears or on their scalp. What exactaly is it? Is it a disease??? BEST ANSWER CHOSEN TOMORROW!!! (best answer gets 10 points)

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis (pronounced /s??ra??s?s/) (suh-RI-uh-sus) is a disorder which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. Psoriasis is hypothesized to be immune-mediated[1][2] and is not contagious.

      The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

      The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Several factors are thought to aggravate psoriasis. These include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking.[3] Individuals with psoriasis may suffer from depression and loss of self-esteem. As such, quality of life is an important factor in evaluating the severity of the disease. There are many treatments available but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

      Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) (L40.0) is the most common form of psoriasis. It affects 80 to 90% of people with psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis typically appears as raised areas of inflamed skin covered with silvery white scaly skin. These areas are called plaques.

      Flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis) (L40.83-4) appears as smooth inflamed patches of skin. It occurs in skin folds, particularly around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), the armpits, under an overweight stomach (pannus), and under the breasts (inframammary fold). It is aggravated by friction and sweat, and is vulnerable to fungal infections.

      Guttate psoriasis (L40.4) is characterized by numerous small round (teardrop-shaped) spots (differential diagnosis - pityriasis rosea - oval shape lesion). These numerous spots of psoriasis appear over large areas of the body, such as the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is associated with streptococcal throat infection.

      Pustular psoriasis (L40.1-3, L40.82) appears as raised bumps that are filled with non-infectious pus (pustules). The skin under and surrounding pustules is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localised, commonly to the hands and feet (palmoplantar pustulosis), or generalised with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body.

      Nail psoriasis (L40.86) produces a variety of changes in the appearance of finger and toe nails. These changes include discolouring under the nail plate, pitting of the nails, lines going across the nails, thickening of the skin under the nail, and the loosening (onycholysis) and crumbling of the nail.

      Psoriatic arthritis (L40.5) involves joint and connective tissue inflammation. Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint but is most common in the joints of the fingers and toes. This can result in a sausage-shaped swelling of the fingers and toes known as dactylitis. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the hips, knees and spine (spondylitis). About 10-15% of people who have psoriasis also have psoriatic arthritis.

      Erythrodermic psoriasis (L40.85) involves the widespread inflammation and exfoliation of the skin over most of the body surface. It may be accompanied by severe itching, swelling and pain. It is often the result of an exacerbation of unstable plaque psoriasis, particularly following the abrupt withdrawal of systemic treatment. This form of psoriasis can be fatal, as the extreme inflammation and exfoliation disrupt the body's ability to regulate temperature and for the skin to perform barrier functions

      Hope this helps.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for psoriasis?
    I'm 15 and I've has psoriasis my whole life, it's terrible. I have itchy, sticky red patches under my arms and behind my ears. My head is constantly itchy and flaking. The medications I'm using aren't working very well but my dermatologist doesn't want to give me a higher prescription. I'm tired of being uncomfortable, and I'm sick of being made fun of. What can I do? Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately there is no cure for psoriasis but there are lots of treatments that can help.

      You will be able to get other treatments than topical creams when you grow older. Usually the first step for a doctor is to prescribe topical steroid or cortisone creams that can clear the patches. Cortisone creams if used for a long period of time can make the skin ''thin'' so use them as much as your doctor told you.
      A great steroid cream that does not thin the skin is called Protopic. Works great and quick like cortisone ones. You could ask your doctor.
      As for the scalp there's an excellent lotion called Propiosalic. It's not oily at all so it's easy to put it on and leave it there if you want without washing your head. Clears my scalp within few days. It's also not addictive.
      Shampoos with tar in them are also great. Massage the scalp with that shampoo well, rinse and then use your normal shampoo.

      Other than that you can try phototherapy. ( Uvb and Puva ) Ask your doctor. You kinda know from the start if that treatment will work for you if sun exposure mostly at summer seems to help your psoriasis.

      They are really close on finding better drugs that will help, like the biological ( injections example : Enbrel,Humira,Stellara ) so just be patient.

      The great thing about having psoriasis now in 2012 is that more and more people know about the disease. They know that it's genetic and not contagious so that's great. In America only more than 7 million people have psoriasis and after all those campaigns about the disease almost everyone knows what it is now.

      You have to take care of your psoriasis like every girl takes care of their skin and face but do not obsess about it. Anxiety triggers psoriasis. It's like a vicious circle. You get anxious about your psoriasis , your psoriasis gets worse, you get more anxious and so on.

      I am 28 years old now ( woman ) and when I was 15 ( with psoriasis ) only a few people knew what psoriasis is. But now, when someone sees a patch on me they go '' Oh you got psoriasis'' And if I start to explain they go '' Oh yea I know a friend of mine has it, it's ok'' Most of them don't even pay attention to my patches. My coworkers had no idea I had it for years. Psoriasis patients think that everyone will notice but they don't actually. If they don't know about the dermatitis you could explain if you want to but I 'm pretty sure they know what it is.

      I had psoriasis kinda all over my body back then and I still had lots of friends and boyfriends that didn't matter at all. I was amazed to see that I was the only once who cared about the condition. So there's nothing to be anxious for.

      Sun and sea salt helps a lot to clear the psoriasis and keep your skin like this for months so try to go to the sea every day at summer.

  7. QUESTION:
    any home remedies for psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis on my knee and I tried using vaseline it only kept it from drying too fast but never relieved the itch which causes it to spread if you scratch it so I was just wondering if anyone know f anything I can use to help get rid of this thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      the most important step in controlling psoriasis is to keep skin well moisturized. A big problem with psoriasis is scale buildup, and moisturizers are extremely effective at preventing this. Plain petroleum jelly is a very effective moisturizer. But if you're buying a commercial moisturizer, those that contain lactic acid, such as LactiCare, seem to work better. Also, Eucerin cream works well as a moisturizer for those with psoriasis.

      Moisturize after bathing. To get the most from your moisturizer, apply it within three minutes after leaving the shower or bathtub. We recommend that you pat yourself dry and apply the moisturizer liberally all over your body--not just on plaques. That's because even 'clear' skin in people with psoriasis is drier than in people who don't have psoriasis. It's thought that little cracks on dry skin might encourage more psoriasis.

      Soak up the sun. Many psoriasis patients are prescribed a specific regimen of ultraviolet light treatments. Getting artificial sunlight from a special lamp or tanning booth can help. An easier and less expensive method is simply to hit the Great Outdoors. "We know that exposure to sunlight is extremely helpful for treating psoriasis," says David Kalin, M.D., a family practitioner in Largo, Florida. A moderate amount of sunlight enhances the production of vitamin D, which may be effective in controlling psoriasis.

      But don't soak up the booze. Doctors are still trying to find out for sure why alcohol exacerbates psoriasis. They suspect that alcohol increases activity of a certain kind of white blood cell that's found in psoriasis patients but not in other people. (But it's also possible that drinkers are just more highly stressed and therefore more prone to psoriasis.)

      "Alcohol is a definite problem," according to Stephen M. Purcell, D.O., chairman of the Department of Dermatology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and assistant clinical professor at Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia. "It's best to not drink at all if you have psoriasis."

      Spice up your bath. Bathing is often a catch-22 for those with psoriasis. That's because soaking in warm water helps soften psoriasis plaques, but it sometimes dries skin and worsens itching. "One way to get the benefits of a bath without the dryness is to add a couple of capfuls of vegetable oil to your bath," says McNeal. "The best way to do it is to get in the tub first, so your body soaks up the water, and then add the oil." Another alternative suggested by McNeal: Mix two teaspoons of olive oil in a large glass of milk and add that to your bath.

      Be extra careful stepping out of the tub, since oils can make surfaces very slippery. (Be sure to scrub the tub afterward.)

      Head to the kitchen to soothe that itchin'. To soothe itching caused by dry skin and psoriasis, dissolve 1/3 cup of baking soda in a gallon of water. Soak a washcloth in the solution, wring it out, and then it apply to the itchy area. Or add a cup of apple cider kitchen vinegar to the water and apply that to the skin.

      Cover the cracks with cow cream. If your skin is cracked because of psoriasis--which can cause itching and more plaques--do what dairymen do. "They found that Bag Balm, a product originally used to relieve cracking in cow udders, worked just as well on their cracked hands," says McNeal. "Then people with psoriasis found it worked great on their dry or cracked skin." Bag Balm is available at most feed stores; some drugstores may be able to order it.

      Take care of mind and body. Stress is a known trigger of psoriasis, so managing your mental state--through exercise, relaxation techniques or whatever mellows you out--is one way to keep your condition under control.

      Guard against infection and injury. "Infection may lead to an outbreak or worsen your condition, so it's important to try to avoid infectious disease," says Dr. Kalin. New lesions may also appear on injured skin, so try to avoid cuts and scrapes.

      Watch what you eat. "Although there are no specific links that have been proven, it appears a diet high in oily fish--such as tuna, mackerel, sardines and salmon--helps reduce the itching and inflammation of psoriasis," says Dr. Lowe.

      Avoid certain foods. "Some anecdotal reports suggest patients do better when they reduce or eliminate tomatoes and tomato-based dishes--possibly because of high acidity levels," says Dr. Kalin. "Also, some of my patients with psoriasis have noticed a decrease in plaques by avoiding or limiting their intake of pork products and other fatty meats as well as caffeine."

      Go electric. If you have plaques on your face, neck, legs or other areas that require shaving, use an electric razor instead of a blade. "An electric razor won't cut skin as easily, and every time you cut yourself, you risk new lesions," says

  8. QUESTION:
    Help with psoriasis?
    I was diagnosed with guttate psoriasis. It's all over my back and stomach. It makes my back look old and wrinkly like when I'm only 17. Does anyone have help to stop the itching and keep my skin looking as young as I am? Any help will be greatly appreciated, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      This type of psoriasis may be treated at home in most mild-to-moderate cases. Keeping the skin moist will prevent extra irritation. Thick moisturizers applied after a bath to keep in moisture and soften the skin are helpful.

      Over the counter topical steroids may help to reduce inflammation and itching.

      Guttate psoriasis may be inherited. Those with a family history of psoriasis have an increased chance of having the disease. Some people carry genes that make them more likely to develop psoriasis.

      People with guttate psoriasis may have a significantly higher number of human leukocyte antigens BW17, B13, or CW6 than others. Psoriasis is the only disease associated with the human leukocyte antigen C gene expression.

      Antigens are proteins on the surface of bacteria, viruses, or material foreign to the body. The body's immune system recognizes the type of antigen present and makes an antibody to destroy the bacteria, virus, or foreign material.

      When the body has a streptococcal infection, it produces antibodies to streptolysin-O that is on the bacterial cell. People with an excess of human leukocyte antigen B13 may not be able to produce enough antibodies to the streptolysin-O, which may be associated with the high rate of guttate psoriasis in these individuals.

      Guttate psoriasis may not be preventable. However, complications or further flare-ups may be reduced by avoiding anything that triggers a psoriasis outbreak. For example, anyone with psoriasis should try to minimize all forms of skin trauma, such as scratching or vigorous rubbing, which may lead to new psoriatic lesions on previously unaffected areas. This is known as the Koebner phenomenon.

  9. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis.......?
    do you know any thing that can help with Psoriasis? what do you do when it hurts a lot?

    • ANSWER:
      I had psoriasis around my junior-senior year of high school. It was horrible, it just came out of nowhere on the back of my legs and my elbows and would not go away no matter what I did it seemed. I lived in Ohio at the time so the cold weather definitely did not help. Then I went to Florida and one of my parent's friends reccomended DermaZinc spray. I bought it and that mixed with the sun made it get a lot better, but still not gone. I moved to Arizona that year though and continued using the spray (just a couple squirts on infected areas after getting out of the shower), i moisturized the areas with the really thick eucerin lotion that comes in a tub, and I also started tanning in tanning beds frequently (like every other day) as my skin got darker, the psoriarsis got lighter, until eventually it dissappeared all together! I haven't had any kind of psoriasis for like 6 years now. So that's what I would reccomend: live in a warm climate (if you can), try to go tanning when possible (the UVA or UVB rays are actually really good for the psoriasis), moisturize daily with heavy duty mosturizer, and use this spray! It worked for me really well.

  10. QUESTION:
    Homeopathic cures for Psoriasis?
    Do you know of any alternate means of clearing Psoriasis - something other than steroids?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is a systemic problem -- not just a local one. And it's not something you can treat yourself with remedies from the health food store. You need to see a Homeopathic doctor in order to find out what is causing your psoriasis, and then he or she will be able to start you on a program to cure what is causing it and any other health issues you may have.
      I have seen numerous cases of not only psoriasis, but eczema and rosacea cured through Homeopathy, and there are stacks of clinical cases that Homeopaths have access to that reveal many thousands of cured cases. In fact, Homeopathy is the only medical system that can do this.
      Conventional medicine doesn't work: it just dispenses steroidal drugs and creams that may temporarily suppress the skin issues.
      There are serious side-effects from taking steroids, including liver damage.
      Homeopathy has no side effects and is safe, gentle and effective.

  11. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis(sp) and hair?
    I have psoriasis on my scalp, welli think it is, and i was wondering whats the best way to get rid of it, without seeing medical help? Any certain kind of shamoo i should use?

    • ANSWER:
      Scalp psoriasis
      How is it treated?

      Many treatment options can help control scalp psoriasis and its symptoms. Sometimes scalp psoriasis will clear on its own (a spontaneous remission), or it can remain on the scalp for long periods of time.
      It is important to select scalp treatments that are agreeable to you. Treatments should never be worse than the psoriasis itself. Consider your lifestyle, available time and the cost to help you decide among the options.

      Tar products and salicylic acid are generally sufficient for treating very mild scalp psoriasis. More severe scalp psoriasis may require persistence and experimentation to find an effective treatment plan. Treatments include topical medications (applied to the skin) and occasionally ultraviolet (UV) light. Treatments are often combined and rotated because a person's psoriasis can become resistant to medications after repeated use. Systemic (oral or injected) psoriasis treatments are not commonly used just for scalp psoriasis, but they may be tried if psoriasis is present elsewhere on the body and/or the psoriasis is severe.

      Treatment schedules
      Scalp treatments must be repeated until you get adequate control of your lesions. This can take up to eight weeks or longer.
      Once you achieve clearing, or a level of acceptable clearing, you may be able to keep psoriasis from coming back by using a tar shampoo or other medicated shampoo daily or twice a week. Moisturizing the scalp may also help.

      Tar products
      Tar products, usually available without a prescription, are widely used to treat scalp psoriasis. You will be able to find over-the-counter (OTC) tar shampoos, creams, gels, oils, ointments and soaps. Tar also can be prescribed by your doctor in a variety of strengths. It may be used as a single treatment or in combination with other treatments.
      While tar is an effective medication, it can stain bedding and gray or white hair, and has a strong odor.

      There are two kinds of tars: coal tar and wood tar. Coal tar is the most common form for treating psoriasis, but some wood tar products, especially soaps (such as Grandpa's Pine Tar soap), can treat scalp psoriasis. Soaps are less expensive and typically last longer than shampoos.

      Coal tar is available in OTC products in concentrations from 1% to 5%, although higher concentrations are sometimes prescribed. Refined coal tars, such as liquor carbonis detergens, commonly referred to as LCD, have less of an odor and may cause less staining. Unfortunately, refined tars are not as strong, and may be harder to find.

      How do you use tar on the scalp?
      Massage tar shampoo into the scalp and leave it on for about five minutes before rinsing it off to allow for maximum absorption of the tar. Shampoo or conditioner can reduce the smell of the tar shampoo and make the hair more manageable.

      Tar gels, creams, solutions and lotions can be massaged into the scalp and left on overnight. These tar products are used for psoriasis on other parts of the body as well.

      Effectiveness will vary for each person. Tests have shown tar shampoos to be superior to shampoos without tar in treating scaling.

      Topical steroids
      Topical corticosteroid medications (steroids) can be effective against scalp psoriasis. These prescription medications come in solutions, gels, creams, lotions, sprays, ointments and foam.
      Topical steroids range from very mild to very strong (potent). Normally, strong steroids can be used safely for scalp psoriasis, but they should not be used continuously for long periods of time. A two-week cycle of treatment is commonly recommended for strong steroids. In addition, they should not be used under a dressing or covering (occlusion). Follow your doctor's instructions carefully.

      Abruptly stopping steroid treatments can cause a rebound (worsening, if stopped too quickly) flare of psoriasis. Slowly reducing the use of steroids can help avoid a rebound flare. Do not use steroid preparations on your face and other sensitive skin areas, such as under the breasts and genitals, unless directed by your doctor. Avoid getting steroids in your eyes.

      Several topical steroid prescription medications are designed specifically for treating scalp psoriasis. These formulas are water- and alcohol-based, which makes it easier to wash them out after treatment.

      Cormax Scalp Application, Clobex Shampoo, Temovate Scalp Application and Olux are four scalp products that contain clobetasol propionate, one of the strongest topical steroids. Clobetasol propionate can be very effective in clearing psoriasis.

      Olux and Luxiq are foam-based prescription scalp medications that contain steroids. Foam-based applicators resemble styling mousse cans. The foam turns into liquid when applied to the skin and is absorbed quickly, leaving little residue.

      Some scalp psoriasis cases become resistant to topical steroids. If this happens, you can switch to other scalp treatments, such as anthralin, Dovonex, Tazorac or tar. It can take several months before topical steroid medications will work again for skin that has become resistant.

      Intralesional steroid scalp injections
      Sometimes doctors inject scalp lesions with steroid medications. This is done only when the scalp psoriasis is mild and involves a few areas. It would not be appropriate to inject many plaques. Steroid injections are given sparingly because the medication can be absorbed into the system.
      Anthralin
      Anthralin is an older, prescription medication that may work for some people with scalp psoriasis. The typical use of anthralin for scalp treatment is 30 minutes with either 0.25% or 0.5% anthralin. Anthralin can be left on the scalp for as little as 10 minutes and then washed off. Higher concentrations are applied for shorter periods of time. This is called Short Contact Anthralin Therapy, or SCAT.
      Anthralin can stain the skin and can cause irritation in some people. Remove anthralin from the scalp by rubbing the shampoo toward the back of the head to avoid getting anthralin on your forehead or in your eyes.

      Psoriatec is the brand name of a 1% anthralin cream that may limit staining because the medication is released from tiny capsules only at skin temperature. Rinse Psoriatec from the scalp, clothing, towels or bathroom fixtures with cool or lukewarm water to prevent these capsules from breaking down; this may prevent the staining and irritation usually associated with anthralin.

      CuraStain (available through a pharmacist as triethanolamine) is a product that may help control the staining associated with anthralin.

      Dovonex
      Dovonex (also known by its generic name calcipotriene) is a prescription topical vitamin D3 derivative that comes in a water- and oil-based scalp solution. After applying Dovonex at night, cover the scalp with a shower cap or plastic bag before going to bed. Confine Dovonex to the scalp because it irritates unaffected skin, particularly the face. You may wish to test a small area before applying it to the entire scalp. Avoid contact with your eyes.
      Tazorac
      Tazorac (also known by its generic name tazarotene) is a topical vitamin A derivative that comes in a cream or gel form for the treatment of psoriasis. The gel absorbs more rapidly than the cream, while the cream may be less irritating for people with dry or sensitive skin.
      Apply Tazorac in a thin film to lesions on the scalp or hairline. The medication may dry out the skin; to reduce irritation, apply moisturizers 30 minutes before Tazorac is used. However, the skin should be dry when treated. Tazorac is safe to use on your face, but it should not be applied around the eyes. Do not cover treated skin.

      Overnight application of Tazorac is recommended. Let the medication air dry on the scalp before going to bed, so you don't spread it on your pillow and face as you sleep.

      Antimicrobial therapy
      Scalp psoriasis can get worse if the scalp becomes infected with bacteria or yeast. If crusting of the scalp along with scaling occurs and/or the lymph nodes in your neck are enlarged, your doctor may prescribe antimicrobial treatment. Mild scalp psoriasis also may respond to treatment with antifungal shampoos such as Nizoral, a prescription shampoo that helps reduce yeast organisms. It may require the use of an antifungal shampoo once or twice a week to maintain results.
      Ultraviolet light
      Hair blocks UV light treatments from reaching the scalp. However, better results can be achieved with conventional UV units if you part your hair in many rows, if you have very thin hair or if you shave your head. Hand-held devices called UV combs are available to deliver a higher intensity of UV light. Natural sunlight may also help if the hair is very thin or the head is shaved.
      See phototherapy and sun and water therapy for more information.

      Medicated shampoos
      Many coal tar and non-coal tar medicated shampoos for treating scalp lesions are on the market (click here for listing). Leave shampoos on the scalp as directed and rinse them out thoroughly.
      Remember, medicated shampoos are designed for the scalp, not the hair. You may want to use a regular cosmetic shampoo or conditioner after your scalp treatment to reduce the smell of the medicated shampoo and make your hair more manageable.

      Systemic treatments for psoriasis
      If moderate to severe psoriasis is present on other skin sites in addition to the scalp, your doctor may prescribe systemic psoriasis medications (medications that are taken by mouth or injection). The most common include methotrexate, oral retinoids, cyclosporine and biologic medications. They may help clear scalp psoriasis, and are only appropriate for very severe cases.
      Systemic psoriasis medications have side effects that must be weighed in relationship to their benefits. Hair loss can be a side effect of certain systemic psoriasis treatments. Ordinarily, the hair will grow back when the medication is stopped.

  12. QUESTION:
    how serious is psoriasis?
    I'm not exactly sure if thats what i have on my head, but i have all of the symptoms of psoriasis, so how serious is it, i read joint pains or arthritis can be caused from it, is that possible?! could my knee pay be involved with the scabs on my head? and how serious is all of this? should i tell my dad or can i just my the meds on my own? are there any home remedies for it?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is caused by your immune system. Normally the skin cells on your scalp are cast off and replaced about once a month, but with psoriasis, the affected skin spots can be reproducing about every week. The new skin cells are produced more rapidly than the old skin cells can be discarded, and it causes itchy, red bumps.

      The bumps are itchy because histamines are being produced by your immune system to fight off the attack it thinks is happening on your skin. The area is red because the blood vessels expand and pump in more blood to sustain the increase in cell production.

      Joint pain can be caused by psoriatic arthritis, which is caused when the immune system begins attacking and inflaming the cartilage between joints. It is possible for joint pain to begin before psoriasis becomes apparent on the skin, but it is rare. Your doctor can do a simple blood test to determine whether or not you have arthritis.

      As for the psoriasis you have on your scalp, the best over-the-counter remedy is to buy a coal tar based shampoo. You can find them in almost any store in the Head n Shoulders section of the shampoo aisle. Neutrogena produces one called T-Gel, I believe. Coal tar retards cell formation, and will help with the itch.

      If the itchy spots are particularly bad, you can buy a salicilic acid based shampoo to use before using the coal tar shampoo. Salicilic acid loosens and softens the skin if the spots become hardened. I think a company called Scalpacin makes a whole line of psoriasis products.

      Psoriasis is not an end-of-the-world affair. About 10% of Americans have psoriasis. If the condition worsens though, you should see a dermatologist, as they can prescribe tougher medication.

      Hope that helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis...?
    Does anybody else have got psoriasis?
    I'm 16 and I've got psoriasis on my scalp for about two years now. Sometimes it's not that bad and other times...
    I'd like to know how you feel about your psoriasis, because, it's not that easy to deal with sometimes...
    Oh yeah, and how big is the possibility that I'll have it on other places?
    Oh yeah, I also got it a little bit in my ears, but not really bad

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, Just to let you know its a common problem amongst teens. Im 18 now but wen I was 14-16 i had i really bad on my head, and my body. I was really good at hiding it and was very self concious. I never did any PE at school because it ment getting changed and people seeing me. I think its easy to become self concious because people dont understand psoriasis. I used to say it was ezsma as people know and understand what that is. As soon as you say psoriasis they would give me a weird look. It important to remember not to stress about it as it can make the condition worse. There are many treatments avalible. One I found very useful was coicois for the scalp. It stops the flaking.

      As for the chances of you getting it in other places well it depends on the type of psoriasis. Some people just get it in one specific place such as an elbow but it can just one day apear somewhere else. There is a possibility that after pubity has finished the psoriasis will disapear forever. But at this moment in time your just going to have to try and cope with it. Remember not to be self concious :D let people know what it is and smile

  14. QUESTION:
    psoriasis?
    i have psoriasis it is kind of like craddle cap or dandruff but more severe and i get it on my head and everywhere else im thirteen and usually old people get this is there any remedys you have for psoriasis

    • ANSWER:
      Honey I've had Psoriasis since I was 5 years old. It's not just an "old folks" skin disease, I'm afraid. It is actually been proven that it is hereditary, meaning you could have inherited it from someone else in your family.

      There is no cure for it, only treatments. There is a shot on the market right now that has shown promising results, but it is very expensive. It is called Enbrel. I cannot afford this shot, so my routine to control my Psoriasis is to use the following products:

      Hair shampoo: TGel medicated shampoo
      Skin Lotion: Elocon lotion OR Cucumber/Aloe lotion
      Skin cleansing: Green Alcohol also known as Witch Hazel

      For the Psoriasis in your scalp, use the TGel shampoo at least 3 times a week.

      For the Psoriasis on your skin, wash your skin with a moisturizing soap and water. Use a cotton ball and put green alcohol on it and wipe it over your skin. Then apply a light coating of Elocon lotion OR Cucumber/Aloe lotion.
      Do this 2 or 3 times a day if you can. It will help control the itching and flaking.

      Good luck, sweetie! (^_^)

  15. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis?!?!!?
    i have psoriasis and i was wondering about how long it takes for sunlight/UV rays to clear up areas where psoriasis has turned red and scaly. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Sunlight alone will not clear your psoriasis but it is beneficial as it creates endogenous vitamin D.
      No medication or alternative medicines work, nor does any miracle creams. At best they only treat the symptoms, you have to eliminate what is causing the problems in the first place. Psoriasis is not viral nor is it contagious if it was you would have been isolated. So let use facts that are well established and ones that you yourself can check. Your autoimmune system malfunctioning, another word not coping.
      Celiac disease (gluten intolerance) l for one would doubt if l will ever meet a psoriasis sufferer who isn't a celiac. Just type into yahoo search bar "celiac psoriasis" There are many celiac related diseases associated with psoriasis sufferers.
      Check out www.celiac.com. The citric as in processed foods as food acid or citric acid etc. does play a role in your psoriasis. If we took a sample of your psoriasis and normal skin the one big difference that is noticed is the calcium content. This is called calcium protease and the other trigger is called acrylamide. Hence
      Acrylamide calcium protease/psoriasis.
      Where are you getting acrylamide from? Acrylamide is formed in foods that are heated like bread, potato chips, cereals etc. Just type into yahoo search bar "acrylamide"
      Only by removing these foods from your diet can you avoid having psoriasis. I had plague psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis for years, l understand how cruel it can be. l can only show you how to beat psoriasis, it is really up to you. By simply changing your Diet Psoriasis Is Avoidable. If you wish to find out more or anyone for that matter l have a website. As l have typed just before l know how cruel psoriasis is, no one should have to suffer from it. All the information is free l have nothing to sell on the website only to share. Any one can e-mail me stirling_strauss@yahoo.com
      warm regards.

  16. QUESTION:
    help needed for psoriasis?
    My boyfriend has very bad psoriasis and his skin always itches and swells up really badly. Does anyone know what can help him??? He uses vaseline to help relieve the dryness...
    we live very far from any ocean...

    • ANSWER:
      Specialist dermatologists generally treat psoriasis in steps based on the severity of the disease, size of the areas involved, type of psoriasis, and the patient's response to initial treatments. This is sometimes called the "1-2-3" approach. In step 1, medicines are applied to the skin (topical treatment). Step 2 uses ultraviolet light treatments (phototherapy). Step 3 involves taking medicines by mouth or injection that treat the whole immune system (called systemic therapy).

      Over time, affected skin can become resistant to treatment, especially when topical corticosteroids are used. Also, a treatment that works very well in one person may have little effect in another. Thus, doctors often use a trial-and-error approach to find a treatment that works, and they may switch treatments periodically (for example, every 12 to 24 months) if a treatment does not work or if adverse reactions occur.
      Treatments applied directly to the skin may improve its condition. Doctors find that some patients respond well to ointment or cream forms of corticosteroids, vitamin D3, retinoids, coal tar, or anthralin. Bath solutions and moisturizers may be soothing, but they are seldom strong enough to improve the condition of the skin. Therefore, they usually are combined with stronger remedies.

      Bath solutions
      People with psoriasis may find that adding oil when bathing, then applying a moisturizer, soothes their skin. Also, individuals can remove scales and reduce itching by soaking for 15 minutes in water containing a coal tar solution, oiled oatmeal, Epsom salts, or Dead Sea salts.

      Moisturizers
      When applied regularly over a long period, moisturizers have a soothing effect. Preparations that are thick and greasy usually work best because they seal water in the skin, reducing scaling and itching.

      Light therapy
      Natural ultraviolet light from the sun and controlled delivery of artificial ultraviolet light are used in treating psoriasis.

      Sunlight
      Much of sunlight is composed of bands of different wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) light. When absorbed into the skin, UV light suppresses the process leading to disease, causing activated T cells in the skin to die. This process reduces inflammation and slows the turnover of skin cells that causes scaling. Daily, short, nonburning exposure to sunlight clears or improves psoriasis in many people. Therefore, exposing affected skin to sunlight is one initial treatment for the disease.

  17. QUESTION:
    Question about Psoriasis?
    I was diagnosed with Guttate Psoriasis when I was in kindergarten, but now i'm not so sure if that's what I had. Back then, I got strep throat and shortly after I had red spots ALL over my body that looked like chicken pox. It took several months to get rid of, and I haven't had an outbreak that bad since then. But NOW I feel like I might have plaque Psoriasis as well. Over the summer, I developed these pink dry bumps with white centers on my chest and upper stomach. I then got it on my eyebrows, arms, and elbows as well. The ones on my chest have all formed together into a big flaky rash, and its bothering me. Is it possible to have two different types of Psoriasis? Does it sound like I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes totally normal. You are diagnosed with Psoriasis period. At the time you had guttate psoriasis. This is usually how it starts. Patches and bigger marks appear later on. You can also have both of them at the same time. Mine started as guttate psoriasis as well, after couple of years or more I started to get big patches also. So I had small dots almost all over my body and bigger patches on my knees, legs and some other areas.
      This can change again. The diagnosis is Psoriasis but psoriasis changes through time. Lot's of people end up with just one or two big patches in their arms or legs when they are older and no other mark in their whole body.

      So the type of Psoriasis does not really matter. Plaque psoriasis is just more difficult to treat. Small psoriasis marks/dots can disappear in 2-3 days if using a proper cortisone cream, but bigger patches need time.
      The mechanism and the genes involved with psoriasis are the same for any type of psoriasis.

      It's like when you acne problems, sometimes you get cysts and if you get them a lot the diagnosis for the time is ''cystic acne ''. That does not mean that it's going to be like this for ever or that you won't get just whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules etc.

      Talk to your dermatologist about this and take a proper treatment.
      For auto immune chronic diseases like psoriasis knowledge about the condition is key to find the proper treatment for you.

  18. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis..?
    i think i may have psoriasis....?!

    I have a small spot on my elbow, and a bit on my upper leg...

    My brother and sister both have it quite bad...

    I noticed the small spot on my elbow about 6 months ago... (me and my long term girlfriend had just split up) could that be the cause....

    What do i need to do..?

    get it checked out by the doc' or can i get summut from a chemist/pharmacy..

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      Currently, there is no cure for psoriasis. However, there are many treatment options that can clear psoriasis for a period of time. Each treatment has advantages and disadvantages, and what works for one patient may not be effective for another. Board-certified dermatologists have the medical training and experience needed to determine the most appropriate treatments for each patient.

      Diagnosis
      There are several forms of psoriasis, and each form has unique characteristics that allow dermatologists to visually identify psoriasis to determine what type, or types, of psoriasis is present. Sometimes a skin biopsy will be performed to confirm the diagnosis.

      To choose the most appropriate treatment method, dermatologists consider several factors:

      Type of psoriasis

      Severity (the amount of skin affected)

      Where psoriasis is located

      Patient?s age and medical history

      Effects psoriasis has on patient?s overall physical and emotional
      well-being

      Types of Treatment
      Psoriasis treatments fall into 3 categories:

      Topical (applied to the skin) ? Mild to moderate psoriasis

      Phototherapy (light, usually ultraviolet, applied to the skin) ? Moderate to severe psoriasis

      Systemic (taken orally or by injection or infusion) ? Moderate, severe or disabling psoriasis

      While each of these therapies is effective, there are also drawbacks.

      Some topicals are messy and may stain clothing and skin. Phototherapy can require 2 to 5 weekly visits to a dermatologist?s office or psoriasis clinic for several weeks. Many of the systemic medications have serious side effects and must be combined or rotated with other therapies to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects. Research is being conducted to find therapies that provide safe, effective, easy-to-use treatment options that provide long-term relief.

  19. QUESTION:
    Is this why I have psoriasis?
    When I was 12 I was playing cricket with my buddies and I hit the ball too hard and it broke this ladie's car window. We ran away ASAP and never told anyone what we had done. A few weeks later I was diagnosed with psoriasis, and today at the age of 43, I still have it! Did I get psoriasis as a punishment for breaking the woman's car window and not owing up to it?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is also called calcium protease. Your immune system is malfunctioning( not coping)with what you are eating. (Your body does not produce calcium...) Gluten intolerance plays a big part...
      why not research for yourself, try typing "calcium protease-psoriasis" in search box. It is your diet, most likely processed foods with citric or food acid (these are high in calcium content). Got doubts want to see your psoriasis flare up just take Calcium Ascorbate "vitamin C" or Ascorbic Acid Vitamin C. Do not say l didn't warn you but it will have an effect on you so go easy .....
      l had psoriasis to 60% to my body l haven't any more. l learnt that most processed foods, soft drinks,etc affected me. Really it's all about eating healthy.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you die from psoriasis?
    Ok so my dad says his friend got told by his doctor that he doesn't much more time to live because of psoriasis. Appearently his symptoms are constant pain in his joints and other parts of his body. Can you actually die from it? If so how? I thought it was just a skin condition.....

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis in auto immune not contagious disease caused by over working genes. Psoriasis is just on the skin. White flakes ( dead skin cells ) exactly like Dandruff but but not only on the scalp.

      Your dad's friend has Psoriatic Arthritis.

      Psoriatic arthritis is a painful, inflammatory condition of the joints that can occur occur in association with psoriasis of the skin. Up to 40% of those that have skin psoriasis also have signs of psoriatic arthritis.
      Symptoms of this disease come and go, however it is a lifelong condition that may result in severe damage to the joints. Joint deformity as well as changes in X-rays are be found in about 40% of people that have psoriatic arthritis.
      People with severe psoriatic arthritis have been reported to have a shorter lifespan than average. and this correlates with the severity of the joint disease.

      There are biological drugs that help a lot with the condition ( injections ).

  21. QUESTION:
    Is psoriasis heriditary?
    My dad had kidney failure before I was born, he's fine now! But he had psoriasis induced by kidney failure. I heard that its heriditary, in my case will it be? I'm 15 and he got it at like 25. Will I get it then?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by over working genes that keep producing skin cells so we end up with white flakes (dead skin cells ) on the skin. It's similar to Dandruff and it has nothing to do with blood like mentioned in another answer.

      We though that it's all about the immune system for so many years but after recent researches we found out that the problem is in the skin itself! Take a look at this research :

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120419121436.htm

      They are trying to identify all the genes involved ( reproduction or skin cells/psoriasis ) in order to find out what is really going on, because things for psoriasis are not clear.

      Scientists tested a lot of people with psoriasis and also their parents and relatives to find out if the genes that are already identified are on everyone. But lots of kids had the gene and their parents didn't.
      That means that psoriasis might not be hereditary as we thought for so many years.

      No one can tell for sure though because when genes are involved and we are talking about an auto immune disease which is not clear we don't have much to come to a conclusion. But this new research is good news ( I guess ).

      I have had psoriasis since I was 15 ( 28 now ). No one else in my family has it. No grandparent with psoriasis, no aunts ankles etc. Just me.

      Even if you have the genes this does not mean that you are going to have active psoriasis. It might never appear. Or it can appear only in a few spots, like elbows/knees and scalp.
      No need to worry. We don't need extra stress in our lives ;-)

  22. QUESTION:
    Scalp psoriasis cause?
    My condition of scalp psoriasis started last year in September. It disappeared when winter 2012 ended (with the help of medicated shampoo). And now, its back. My parents believe it was the combination of summer weather and concealing my head with a hat, beanie, etc. Not sure i really believed that at first, but is it possible? Could the excessive concealing of my head and hot weather be the cause, or is it still unknown and remains uncurable but treatable like scientists say?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by genes. It has no cure, only treatments that can help as soon as you keep doing them.

      What causes all those flakes and psoriasis patches? In normal people psoriasis free, skin cells reproduce once every 30 days approximately. In psoriasis the skin cells reproduce themselves once every 1 or 2 days, so all the dead skin cells ( flakes ) remain on the skin and keep building up day by day.
      This is happening cause of over working genes involved in the production of skin cells.

      Stress, anxiety, toxins from food or other products we use everyday, fever, cold/flu or other conditions trigger psoriasis.

      The sun and sea swimming during the summer helps to totally clear psoriasis most of the times. It's not the hat you are wearing and the steam inside or anything. Psoriasis is getting worse in winter in 80% of patients. The more you swim the better. If you get to go for vacations for enough days of live next to the sea you can clear your psoriasis and keep it clear for months during the winter.

      Psoriasis shampoos are not for treatment but for maintenance.
      Avoid head and shoulders, ultrex etc. because they are harsh for the scalp and it's ph. They are so strong that the scalp gets used to them and they stop working. Worst part is that the interfere with the scalp ph and no other treatment will work in the future.

      Use shampoos with tar in them, not harsh at all and they work great.
      During the winter you need to use a proper lotion treatment to keep your scalp clean if psoriasis appears.
      I've tried almost every product available and I've found that Propiosalic works the best. It has salicylic acid which clears the scalp fast.
      You apply it 1 or 2 times a day and you don't need to wash your hair at all afterwards. It dries out in about half an hour and it's not noticeable. Clears up the scalp ( even for severe scalp psoriasis ) in a few days to a week if applied everyday or every other day. (under 4 dollars ) Ask your pharmacist or your dermatologist.

      You can then keep using the tar shampoo to help it stay clean for long.

      Gluck

  23. QUESTION:
    Wot is scalp psoriasis?is it curable?
    wot is scalp psoriasis??my doctor told me tat i am suffering from this disease...is it something to worry about?i am really worried about my hair..i've heard it causes temporary hair loss..but some people say tat it can lead to permanent hair loss as well..nd moreover my doc said tat it is not curable..but it can be controlled with proper medication nd rt treatment...

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis (pronounced /s??ra??s?s/) is a non-contagious disorder which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes on a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. In contrast to eczema, psoriasis is more likely to be found on the extensor aspect of the joint.

      The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

      The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Factors that may aggravate psoriasis include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking.[1] There are many treatments available, but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

      Treatment:

      Treatment

      There can be substantial variation between individuals in the effectiveness of specific psoriasis treatments. Because of this, dermatologists often use a trial-and-error approach to finding the most appropriate treatment for their patient. The decision to employ a particular treatment is based on the type of psoriasis, its location, extent and severity. The patient?s age, sex, quality of life, comorbidities, and attitude toward risks associated with the treatment are also taken into consideration.

      In 2008, the FDA approved three new treatment options[20] available to psoriasis patients: 1) Taclonex Scalp, a new topical ointment for treating scalp psoriasis; 2) the Xtrac Velocity excimer laser system, which emits a high-intensity beam of ultraviolet light, can treat moderate to severe psoriasis; and 3) the biologic drug adalimumab (brand name Humira) was also approved to treat moderate to severe psoriasis. Adalimumab had already been approved to treat psoriatic arthritis.

      Talconex ointment may cause psoriasis to rebound signficantly.

      Medications with the least potential for adverse reactions are preferentially employed. If the treatment goal is not achieved then therapies with greater potential toxicity may be used. Medications with significant toxicity are reserved for severe unresponsive psoriasis. This is called the psoriasis treatment ladder.[21] As a first step, medicated ointments or creams, called topical treatments, are applied to the skin. If topical treatment fails to achieve the desired goal then the next step would be to expose the skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This type of treatment is called phototherapy. The third step involves the use of medications which are taken internally by pill or injection. This approach is called systemic treatment.

      Over time, psoriasis can become resistant to a specific therapy. Treatments may be periodically changed to prevent resistance developing (tachyphylaxis) and to reduce the chance of adverse reactions occurring. This is called treatment rotation.

      Types of psoriasis:

      Photograph of an arm covered with plaque psoriasis.

      The symptoms of psoriasis can manifest in a variety of forms. Variants include plaque, pustular, guttate and flexural psoriasis. This section describes each type (with ICD-10 code [6]).[4]

      Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) (L40.0) is the most common form of psoriasis. It affects 80 to 90% of people with psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis typically appears as raised areas of inflamed skin covered with silvery white scaly skin. These areas are called plaques.

      Flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis) (L40.83-4) appears as smooth inflamed patches of skin. It occurs in skin folds, particularly around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), the armpits, under an overweight stomach (pannus), and under the breasts (inframammary fold). It is aggravated by friction and sweat, and is vulnerable to fungal infections.

      Guttate psoriasis (L40.4) is characterized by numerous small round spots (differential diagnosis - pityriasis rosea - oval shape lesion). These numerous spots of psoriasis appear over large areas of the body, such as the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is associated with streptococcal throat infection.

      Pustular psoriasis (L40.1-3, L40.82) appears as raised bumps that are filled with non-infectious pus (pustules). The skin under and surrounding the pustules is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localised, commonly to the hands and feet (palmoplantar pustulosis), or generalised with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body.
      Psoriasis of a fingernail

      Nail psoriasi

  24. QUESTION:
    Do i have Psoriasis or Eczema?
    I have had this very dry skin on my hands and feet since i was six years old and now my hands have becoming out of control and they get extremely dry and crack and my dermatologist said it was psoriasis but eczema describes my condition better. Is there a big difference in treatment of them because im getting this steroid ointment and i soak my hands twice a day and put it on it controls it but they are still dry and flaky.

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis on the hands and feet is rare but it does happen. I have Psoriasis too but mine is on my scalp and elbows. Psoriasis is an auto-immune disorder and there is no cure, only treatment and control. Flare ups can and will happen throughout our lives. Eczema is caused by bacteria and is simply a matter of topical creams and shampoos. For Psoriasis, steroids are used to control the swelling of inflammation. Salicylic acid helps the flaking skin and coal tar extract in cremes/shampoos slows-reverses the rapid cellular division. And finally, ultraviolet light damages skin cells and so helps in the treatment as well.
      There are four types of Psoriasis so each type is slightly different.

  25. QUESTION:
    Natural cure for Psoriasis?
    Hi All,

    Can anybody suggest me the natural way to deal with Psoriasis. One of my friends is having problem related,and had gone through different treatments, but not got much relief from the problem.
    Please suggest.
    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for psoriasis only treatments that help with the symptoms as long as you keep doing them.

      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by over working genes. So no, there is no natural cure or remedy that will work. She/he needs to see a dermatologist. The doctor will inform your friend about the available treatments. There are a lot, depending on her/his age and the severity for the psoriasis.

      What triggers psoriasis : Fever, cold/flu, climate, other conditions, infections, stress/anxiety, toxins from products we use or food.

      Food to avoid : Red wine, chocolate, red meat, fried potatoes, beer, fast food.
      The healthier the diet, the 'cleaner' we stay.

      A moisturizing cream is necessary, 2 times a day if possible. Tell your friend to get a deep moisturizing cream from the drugstore, with no perfume in it.

      First step/first treatments are the topical creams. Corticosteroids or salicylic acid ones. They always work, but the problem can re appear after a while. If her/his psoriasis is not aggressive though, the skin can stay clear for long after this treatment. It's different on everyone.

      Other than the topical treatments there is also the PUVA phototherapy. She'll be able to do that at a specialized hospital. Ask a dermatologist for that again.

      Next step are the pills. They can clear psoriasis completely. If you stop them you will get the symptoms back.

      If pills don't work, there the biological drugs ( injections ) such as Enbrel, Stelara, Humira etc. They weaken the immune system so psoriasis stays into remission. Completely clear skin, without one single spot.

      Sun exposure in general helps.
      The best natural therapy for psoriasis is sea swimming. But you need to go to the sea every day and stay in the water for more than 1 hour each time. It can clear up the skin and keep is like this for long. It might take time though.

  26. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis?????
    What is the best thing for redness on nose and flakey skin caused by psoriasis????? i have used products like mg-217, dermarest, and cortizone

    • ANSWER:
      Check out www.beewild.com

      Medically Trialled -Steroid Free Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream was the first in our range of therapeutic creams to be developed by Company Director Robert Davidson who used the cream on his own psoriasis with great success before offering it to the public.
      Mr Davidson worked for years to extract and isolate the substances bees produce to keep their hives disease free and he blended these extracts into a cream that appears to both boost the immune system and increase the body?s natural healing abilities.
      The two extracts - Extract A (organic hydrocarbons) and Extract B (proteins) have also been found to contain Coic Acid; which has antifungal properties, Caffeic Acid; demonstrated to be effective against tumours, bacteria and viruses as well as having anti-inflamatory and immunomodulatory properties, and Linoleic Acid; used to treat such conditions as eczema and acne.
      In 1999 in the first controlled medical trials of the Skin Care Cream, the Wellington (New Zealand) School of Medicine concluded that: "Cautious support can be given to the claims of the manufacturer that Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream is effective in the treatment of eczema".The cream has also successfully passed cytotoxicity tests.

      The benefits of using Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream are many:

      * Medically trialled.
      * No known side effects.
      * No toxins.
      * Can be used while taking cortisone and steroids.
      * It?s effective on such a large range of skin and allergic complaints that it can replace most of the expensive creams and lotions in your medicine cabinet.
      * Heals broken inflamed skin and stops the itch that can so often rob you of your quality of life.
      * In use for over 10 years - hundreds of testimonials acknowledging its effectiveness.
      * Natural extracts blended with the gentlest and most natural of pharmaceutical creams.
      * No cortisone or steroids.
      * No prescription needed.
      * Long lasting.
      * 100% money back guarantee.
      * We?re only a phone call away if you have any questions.

      Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream can be used on a wide range of complaints:

      * Skin complaints such as psoriasis, excema, measles, mumps, chicken pox and shingles.
      * Allergic skin reactions such as acne and insect bites.
      * Skin burns ? use to reduce recovery time and to reduce scaring on chemical burns, radiation burns, liquid burns and sunburn.
      * Virus infections such as shingles, cold sores, herpes simplex and herpes zoster.
      * Allergic respiratory reactions such as asthma, hay fever and sinus (rub the cream over the affected area several times a day and over time these reactions may be reduced.
      * Reduces swelling in bruises and haemorrhoids (piles).
      * Fungal infections such as athlete?s foot and cracked heels.
      * Cuts and broken skin heal faster.
      * Recommended for skin ulcers and used for this purpose by a number of New Zealand retirement and nursing homes.

  27. QUESTION:
    Can vaccines cause psoriasis?
    My husband who is 52 never had psoriasis or does it run in his family history. Two years ago he had 2 vaccines, one was the twinrix vaccine ( protects against hepatitis A and hepatitis B) and the other to protect against shingles. Not even a few weeks later did he start seeing red spots on his legs and was diagnosed with psoriasis.
    Has anyone else had this happen to them? His family doctor says the vaccines have nothing to do with this but after some research I have read that this may be a cause. Not sure if the psoriasis were dormant and taking the vaccines aggravated something in his system....he has tried everything and it's getting worse.
    Anyone else had something similar like this happen to them? Any help???

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease. Vaccines can cause autoimmune disease. If your husband went 50 years without psoriasis, and then 2 weeks after getting 2 vaccines, developed the disease, it is much more likely than not that the vaccines, which can cause autoimmune disease, did cause the autoimmune disease in your husband. (Unless he was also given other drugs or other environmental exposures during that 2 week period, that are also known to cause autoimmune disease).

      If you live in the United States, there is a 3 year statute of limitations to file a claim with the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. There is no time limit for filing a report with VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System).

      As for treatment, I would suggest weaning off any steroid drugs or creams, and starting low dose naltrexone.
      http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/index.htm#What_diseases_has_it_been_useful_for It is an FDA approved prescription drug that is made by compounding pharmacies. He should also be taking molecularly distilled fish oil.

      If you would like to read of other cases of psoriasis that people thought were caused by Twinrix or the shingles vaccine, you can read VAERS reports. Go to http://medalerts.org and click on the red "search now." Open section 2, and click on psoriasis as a symptom. In section 3, click on Twinrix and Varicella Zoster. Then click on "Find." There are only 15 reports, but reporting to VAERS is voluntary, and most people don't even know the reporting system exists. So it's been estimated by the U.S. government that VAERS reports represent only a tiny percentage of actual cases.

  28. QUESTION:
    How to help psoriasis?
    My 12 year old son has psoriasis. I realize that there is no cure, but does anyone have a natural remedy that would help? He has switched to aluminum-free deodorant, and has eliminated dairy, red meat, gluten and citrus from his diet. It still seems to be spreading. Any advice would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      psoriasis is curable... but there are chances of recurrence in older age when immunity is low... in a process called skin turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to surface. it generally takes a month but in case of psoriasis it happens in days as ur skin cells rises too fast..

      There are several ayurvedic medicines for psoriasis... i know some doctors who give ayurvedic medicines.. u have to follow strict dietary rules when under ayurvedic medication.. homeopathy is also very helpful but works slowly.. alopathic medicines are good but they have side effects..

      Some alopathic medicines are as follows:
      Neotrexate and methiotrexate medicines, they are known for curing rheumatoid arthritics but they also works fine with psoriasis. Please note that they should be taken with Cetrizine tablet as they have side-effect as headache and Folic acid capsules should be taken as the patient can have folic acid deficiency when under medication of such medicines. Diprovate Lotion and Dermovate lotion should be applied externally to control the itch and their spread..

      for ayurvedic cure there are certain medicines for psoriasis.. i suggest u to go to Shir Ramdevbaba for treatment.. his treatment are natural and without sideeffects..

      i wish he gets cured soon... god bless u.. please feel free to contact me on message or email me at modi_mihir@yahoo.com

  29. QUESTION:
    Help with psoriasis? diagnosis and treatment options?
    around last year I started to develop a red patch on both sides of nose, the left side is worse. I didn't know what it was and wanted to see a dermatologist but my parents took a while to get me in there. I was 16 at the time and I'm 17 now btw. around sept/October of this year I finally went to see a dermatologist because my skin would turn bright red during anything, I didn't really notice flaking but the redness was inevitable. my derm said I had psoriasis and prescribed me protopic .1% for it. now from what I've read psoriasis is can flare up from many things like stress and infections. I recall last winter having a pretty bad upper respiratory infection, I was stressed from wrestling and I had gotten a concussion too. but I've noticed lately my "psoriasis" is spreading, instead of the two spots around my nose I have a square like shape of redness from my upper lip to my upper nose. lately ive noticed a few spots on my chin and close to my mouth. I don't really think I have psoriasis, because it really doesn't build up flakes, but I'm no doctor can somebody please tell me what common diseases/infections or whatever are commonly misdiagnosed for psoriasis? and it's never gone into remission, it's just like a rash that's always been there. people say theirs goes away and comes back but mine has just always been there since winter of last year. and I don't have it anywhere else except for the square on my face now bits and parts of chin. and from what I've heard psoriasis isn't very common on the face, mostly feet hands elbows and such, hairline scalp too. but really I just want somebody's opinion on this because it's really really bugging me and Its stolen my peace of mind from me, any comments will be greatly appreciated and thank you for taking the time to read this.

    • ANSWER:
      It's not common to misdiagnose psoriasis nowadays because it's a well known disease. This could happen 20 years ( which is not far ) ago but not now.
      You have a dermatitis and that's for sure and if it's not psoriasis it's eczema.

      If you are not sure though, go and see another dermatologist.

      My psoriasis has been aggressive from the start, meaning the spots never leave but only if treated. In most cases psoriasis is aggressive and only a few people with mild psoriasis can leave it without a treatment and the spots can go away on their own and come back after an illness or infection.

      The first stage of a psoriasis patch/mark/spot is red, irritated skin that looks like like eczema. This skin inflammation is caused from the build up. You can't see the build up but there is underneath.
      As the spot is getting worse white/silvery flakes start to appear on top until the area is covered completely with the flakes. This is the last stage and the worst part.

      Also you need to know that there are different types of psoriasis. Guttate psoriasis for example, where the spots are red, small and not covered with flakes. Plaque psoriasis is also common and you get bigger patches, red and inflamed skin that leads to flakes.
      Erythrodermic psoriasis : Red skin and this type of psoriasis affects mostly the body surface.

      It usually starts as guttate psoriasis and can transform to plaque psoriasis. Mine started the same way. Psoriasis changes by the time and if you have guttatte psoriasis doesn't mean that it's going to be like this for ever. You can also have all the types together, just in different areas of the body.

      What triggers psoriasis : Fever, cold/flu, infections, other conditions, climate, stress/anxiety, medications, toxins from food or other products we use everyday.

      It's in the genes and you can have the symptoms without a cause anyway but it's always good to know what triggers a flair up.
      There is no cure, that is why we say we have our psoriasis into remission when we don't have a flair up, but that does not mean that you have no spots at all.

      It's not easy to stay clean for long.

      Most treatments work as soon as you keep using them. Your doctor did good to prescribe Protopic because it's not a steroid and has no cortisone in, so you can apply it on the face safely. Cortisone causes thinning of the skin and it's not safe to use in on the face, even though lots of dermatologists still prescribe cortisone for face psoriasis or eczema.
      Protopic will work for any dermatitis and it's also appropriate for eczema. So it will help whatever your dermatitis is.
      Just make sure to use a tiny bid. It does not contain cortisone but it contains another strong substance.

      You need to avoid : Red wine, beer, red meat, fried food, chocolate. The healthier the diet and the less the toxins from products the better the chances of staying clean for long.

      The absolute therapy for psoriasis/eczema is sea swimming. So during summer go swimming as much as possible. If you do it everyday for 2-3 weeks you can stay clean for months. Also if you are close to the sea, you can take an empty bottle of water and fill it with the sea salt. You can keep it and still be active for about a week. Just apply it on the face and other affected areas 1-2 times a day.

      Do not stress about it because this is like a vicious circle. You are stressed and you get psoriasis - the patches and spots cause more stress about the disease - this causes a flair up or can keep the spots there for ever. Try don't to think about it in order to break that circle.

      What is psoriasis ( same for eczema ) in simple words : An autoimmune disease, meaning the genes involved in the reproduction of skin cells are over working, causing skin inflammation and later on flakes. In normal people skin cells die and reproduce once every 40 days approximately. If you have psoriasis that happens once every 24/48 hours. So you got the inflamed skin and the flakes ( dead skin cells ) on top.

      Start using Protopic and the spots will clear up completely in a few days or weeks depending the severity. It takes at about a week for mine to disappear if I catch them on an early stage. The longer you have a spot on your body the longer it will need to go away with a treatment. Also the bigger the patch the longer it will take.
      You will clean up completely. Use the cream again if you get new ones in the future and other than that try to forget about it. This is the most difficult part.

      Gluck

  30. QUESTION:
    tattoos and psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis that will not go away. I've been told that any trauma to the skin could cause my psoriasis to flair up in that spot. I go tanning every other day to try and keep it under control, it's supposed to help. Has anyone dealt with this before? Will the constant tanning fade my tattoo if I get color?
    I don't have psoriasis on my shouler blade where I want to put it and it's going to be pretty small but I'll ask an artist before I go through with it.
    What if I covered it up with a bandaid before tanning? And it's already going to be green?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey burntglitter, I'll tell ya a secret....I have psoriasis too. I have it bad enough that I go to the dermatologist once a month for a shot. And I have to use various topical lotions and cremes to help keep it under control. You have been told wrong....damage to the skin WILL NOT cause your psoriasis to flair up in that spot.(Doctors still aren't completely sure what causes flairups but contributing factors are stress, damage to your immune system and even genetics play a role). Dermatologist DO use light therapy to treat psoriasis...but this treatment is usually done in conjunction with various medications .......and only in severe cases. All this aside, my dermatologist is aware of my tattoos and is aware that I plan on getting more. He's not a big tattoo fan, but he has checked the areas I have tattooed, and the ones I plan on getting tattooed, for moles or other signs of skin cancer and he has given me the go ahead. Once you have a tattoo if psoriasis does flair up there and forms plaques.... Its really not a problem (remember ink is in a subcutaneous layer of the skin and plaques are formed by the OUTER layer growing out of control). You just apply the medication....wait a few hours until the plaque softens and then just wash it off in the shower. You tattoo will look as good as new (actually it will look BRIGHTER in that spot until a new layer of skin grows in) I really think you should see a Dermatologist and let him put you on a treatment regiment. Tanning in the sunbed is only going to marginally help your psoriasis...and is playing hell with your skin and your tattoo. In just the last couple of years new medications have been developed that will give you your life back. My outbreaks are now few and far between.....and with medication hopefully it will stay that way.

      I hope this helps you.....good luck
      rider

  31. QUESTION:
    is Psoriasis Genetic?
    My Father has Psoriasis and so did my Grandmother but hers went away? i was wondering if i would get it is it genetic??

    • ANSWER:
      Why is psoriasis genetic? This skin disorder is considered to be genetic because genomewide analyses have found there are nine locations on various chromosomes and they are strongly associated with the occurrence of psoriasis. They are known as psoriasis susceptibility and have been marked from 1 to 9, for example PSORS 1 ? PSORS 9. Within these nine locations are genes. And most of these genes lay on pathways that cause inflammation and certain mutation of these genes are found in psoriasis. This is basically why the answer to is psoriasis genetic is a yes. This is the primary genetic cause of psoriasis.

      When you get answer to the question is psoriasis genetic you will need to understand something quite vividly. That is psoriasis is generally caused by PSORS 1 and it is responsible for almost 50% of heritability. It actually controls the genes that are responsible for the health of your immune system and for the encoding proteins that is found in people who are affected by psoriasis. Chromosome 6 in MHC contains PSORS 1 and it is responsible for controlling the functions of your immune system. About 3 genes in this PSORS 1 have a link with psoriasis vulgaris. This lead to a positive answer to the question is psoriasis genetic.

      When you ask is psoriasis genetic then knowing just about PSORS 1 will not suffice. Genomewide scans have detected several other genes that manifest altered characteristics during psoriasis. Some are characterized by inflamed signal proteins. This in turn affects the well being of the immune system that plays a crucial part in psoriasis. Some of these genes are responsible for some other autoimmune diseases as well. Once you got your answer to the question, is psoriasis genetic you will need to find about its treatment. Knowing the cause and initiating the treatment in time controls the spread of psoriasis.

  32. QUESTION:
    SCALP PSORIASIS.PLEASE HELP ME.?
    I have scalp psoriasis im trying to get it under control but how! and now it is starting to trail to my face and i cant have that happen! this is so embarrasing. i havent worn my real hair for some months now and im getting depressed. please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      In my research in your topic, I came across this article from the National Psoriasis Foundation Forum . This is what one sufferer has to say :

      When having tattoo done, any injury to the skin can result in something called the Koebner effect. The Koebner effect, which was named after the doctor who first described the phenomenon, basically means that an injury to a previously healthy patch of skin (say from a cat scratch or a shaving cut) can result in a new patch of psoriasis . It can also mean that an injury to an existing patch of psoriasis can cause that existing psoriasis lesion to get worse. Not every injury results in the Koebner effect and not ever psoriasis patient experiences the Koebner effect. I don't experience it, but it sounds like you do.

      At the same time of research, I also came across a cream product that can help to relief your psoriasis. This is what the product advertised :

      According to the National Psoriasis Foundation , between 150,000 and 260,000 new cases of Psoriasis are diagnosed each year?amounting to more than 5 million Americans - so you are not alone.

      If you have Psoriasis, getting relief for your skin is a top priority. While there is currently no cure, you can still get relief with a new product being advertised which is made with FDA-approved active ingredient . The product from Revitol Skin Care Product is called Dermasis Psoriasis Cream and it works to help control your skin symptoms in a smooth, non-greasy formula that absorbs quickly?and will not stain your clothes or skin.

      The product unique formulation of ingredients not only soothes and moisturizes your skin, but its active ingredient also helps control the scaling and flaking associated with Psoriasis to help your skin to heal naturally.

      Hope this info will help you decide on getting the tattoo done as wel as help you to get some medicine to relief your icth, redness and scaling.

      Click on link to get more information on Dermasis Psoriasis Cream

  33. QUESTION:
    laser treatment for psoriasis???
    hi i have mild psoriasis all around my hairline and scalp...im seeking treatment and might go for laser treatment too...i 'really' want to know whether r skin gets back to normal and smooth after laser treatment.
    from experience i know that after using ointments and all it gets perfect but if i discontinue using the medicines it comes bck:(
    i want to know if same is the case with laser treatment...please check around from your references and help me:)

    • ANSWER:
      PSORIASIS IS A INCURABLE CHRONIC CONDITION, WHICH IS THOUGHT TO BE AN IMMUNE SYSTEM MALFUNCTION. A LASER WILL DO NOTHING FOR PSORIASIS. HERE IS THE LINK TO THE NPF http://www.psoriasis.org/home/ PSORIASIS IS A CHRONIC, UNPREDICTABLE CONDITION. THERE ARE TOPICAL (APPLIED TO SKIN) TREATMENTS, AND SYSTEMIC (A PILL OR SHOT IS GIVEN) TREATMENTS. I WOULD ADVISE YOU TO TRY ALL THE TOPICAL STUFF FIRST, THOUGH IT WILL PROBABLY BE HIT AND MISS...THE PROBLEM WITH THE PILLS, IS THAT THEY HAVE SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS. GOOD LUCK

  34. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for psoriasis?
    I have it on my fingers and the skin breaks up and bleeds. It has been diagnosed by a consultant as a hybrid type of psoriasis. Need help!

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is treatable with topical steriods, but they only suppress the symptoms, they don't treat the cause. Stress is a major cause of psoriasis outbreaks and anything you can do to reduce stress in your life can help reduce the symptoms.

      I use an essential oil mix to treat my psoriasis: lavender, bergamot and neroli in jojoba oil. It isn't a cure, but helps keep it under control without using steroids. All three oils are useful in reducing stress and treating skin conditions.

      Diet can also affect psoriasis. Alcohol, caffeine, sugar and other stimulants can make it worse. Reducing the use of stimulants, doing a colon detox and eating organic foods can help.

  35. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis....?
    Does anyone know how to tame psoriasis........ is there anything to help cure it or at least nix some of the problems? I know there is speacial shampoos with coal tar and sylacilic acid, but is there anything else I can try?
    I have this problem on my scalp. It's not a problem anywhere else.
    I have psoriasis on my scalp, it's not a problem anywhere else. It causes a heavy and embarrassing flaking.

    • ANSWER:
      While there is no true cure for psoriasis yet, there are many over-the-counter and prescription products that help to treat the symptoms, such as flaking and itching. I have had psoriasis on my scalp for about 3 years, and tried everything over-the-counter (tar shampoos, dandruff shampoos, creams, etc) and nothing worked. Finally, I was prescribed a shampoo called Ketoconazole, and it worked! Best of all, it doesn't stink like the tar shampoos. Ask your dermatologist about it, it's been such a blessing! Also, there's great information on this website:

      http://www.psoriasite.com

      It has all kinds of information, from risk factors to types of psoriasis to things that you can do to try to minimize the effects. It helps you understand what you can do to try to minimize your symptoms. Hopefully this helps, and I hope you get the relief that you need soon!

  36. QUESTION:
    How to cover up Psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis on my arms (not terrible). I have cover up to cover it, but after ten minutes, it dries up and you can see the psoriasis again. Im a guy so im not good with makeup. How can i cover psoriasis with it? Alternatively, are there any other techincs?

    • ANSWER:
      From WebMD:

      1. "Cosmetic products. While standard lotions and makeup may not help, some cosmetic products are designed to help people with skin problems. For instance, certain creams have green dyes that neutralize the redness on the skin. Many people with psoriasis use the brand DermaBlend. Ask your doctor for recommendations."

      2. "Self-tanning lotions. While they once made people more orange than tan, today's self-tanning lotions look more realistic. They can also work as psoriasis camouflage, some experts say. Keep in mind that tanning lotions don't provide any actual protection against the sun's rays. Considering that many people with psoriasis spend a lot of time in the sun as treatment, you need to be careful about getting excess exposure."

      "Be careful where you use it. Don't use any cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis on open sores, or raw or bleeding skin. If you have pustular or erythrodermic psoriasis, ask your doctor before using any cosmetics. Cover-up may not work and could just make your psoriasis worsen."

      "Watch out for skin irritation. It should be common sense, but if cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis seems to aggravate your skin, stop using it."

      "Know the limits. Psoriasis camouflage doesn't work for everyone. If your psoriasis is under good control and all you have is some redness -- or brown spots -- cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis may help. But if there are raised patches or the skin is scaly, no cover-up will really work very well."

      My mom has used Dermablend and says it works great. It was originally made for scars. It is sold at most department stores like Macy's.

      Hope this helps!

  37. QUESTION:
    does masturbating aggravate psoriasis ?
    A person who is having psoriasis , if he / she masturbates will it aggrivate psoriasis or can mastrubating be a cause for psoriasis

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is a an auto-immune disease that usually manifests itself as scaling, in frequently rubbed areas of the body (i.e. elbow, knees, scalp, ankles, etc.) Normally the skin regenerates in 28days, but in psoriatic patients, new skin is produced in a fraction of the normal cycle (just a few days). This explains the thickening and scaling of the skin.

      Though Psoriasis is currently thought to be auto-immune in origin, its exact cause (antigen) is still unknown, which explains the lack of a definitive cure and the existence of several symptomatic treatment modalities.

      Any emotional stimulus may aggrevate psoriasis. Plus the friction that masturbation entails MAY aggrevate psoriasis in the areas that is subjected to frequent rubbing.

  38. QUESTION:
    Does psoriasis lead to psychological issues?
    My husband suffers from psoriasis on the higher end. He maintains very low hygiene and expects me to cope with everything. He has also been verbally and emotionally abusive. Is psorisis the root cause behind this? How can I deal with it? I am currently separated.
    He has psoriasis since 10 years. We married a year ago.

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis does not lead to psychological issues. His poor hygiene may be a result of depression from the poor self esteem he feels about his looks because of the psoriasis. Also causing him to be abusive, or he may have just grew up in an abusive family and feels that's how men act. Or just the stress he has been under from the psoriasis. There are treatments for cases of moderate to severe psoriasis that work very well. If you have insurance and don't feel too threatened by him to mention this. Also poor hygiene can cause a flair in psoriasis.
      I would first tell him you don't like the way he treats you and won't remain with someone who is abusive and a threat to you and your children or possible future children before getting involved any further in an abusive relationship which will ultimately destroy your self esteem and cause you to live in fear and possibly result in severe harm or death.
      Choose your words wisely with a short fused man. But, stand your ground. His psoriasis seems secondary to his abuse. Maybe get help for both. Good luck

  39. QUESTION:
    Can Pilot have Psoriasis?
    My passion is to become a Commercial Pilot. I have the required height and weight, eye sight and every thing is fine to proceed for the test. But I am Psoriasis infected. Its been nearly 4 years it started. I have 4 patches on my foot and 1 patch in my fore finger. There is no permanent cure for it, but i am taking medication to supress it, to avoid iritation and making it dry( Oinment and a tablet). My question is "Is it a No for a Pilot?"

    Thanks.
    I know i will be clarified of this doubt if i take medical test for pilot.. But i wanted to make sure before i take it. So i can take it easily if rejected during test..
    Dont do advertisements here please. I know nothing works. I just need an answer for my question
    hmm i searched for the symptoms.. it matches mine.. but i have good sleep at night and my ear is fine.. But my mom have said i have been scratching the patches during my sleep. But 2 of the doctors said it is psoriasis.. patches are 3 to 4cm long with dry scaly skin.
    Yes, I had Athlete foot recently.. Now i am not sure which disease i have.. 3 as of now.. this gives me more stress.. I want to know whether i will pass my medical test or is it a problem to have Psoriasis or dyshidrosis or scabies? Please let me know this..

    • ANSWER:
      Due to Psoriasis you will not be selected for Pilot.Psoriasis is caused due to over reacting of body immune system. So to balance the body immune system Please drink green AMLA JUICE which is available at Patanjalee Yog Peeth outlets of BaBa Ram dev Ji @ 1lt pack Rs.90 only. 30 ml juice by adding 30 ml water be taken after both the meal for 1-2 month regularly. Please do not use shampoo or bathing soap to come in contact to the area effected with Psoriasis, You may Use gram flour having 1 tea spoon turmeric powder & 10 ml Sesame oil & little water in it to make it pasty now apply paste one by one to your body parts & rub gently till removal of the paste then take bath with water only.Apply ALOEVERA Pulp over the effected area & massage gently for 5 minutes twice daily.Shampoo & soap contains some caustic soda in them which enhance the problem.
      Have 100 ml Glycerin & add 35 ml Lemon juice to it shake well & store. Now apply this to the surface effected after bathing & at Bed time daily till cure.
      Purchase Homoeopathic medicine GREYPHITES------200 potency seal pack 30 ml. 1 drop of this medicine in half cup water be taken twice daily till cure.
      Curd /Lemon / Papaya / Guava / Green leafy vegetables /Apples be added to your daily diet.
      If Psoriasis effected your scalp please use Fuller's Earth ( Multani Mitti ) to wash your hair.
      If you observe my suggestions regularly for 3 month you will get rid of psoriasis.After 15 days you will feel some better, but continue the process till cure. If Psoriasis is of old nature it may be cured more than 3 month.

  40. QUESTION:
    Ringworm or Psoriasis?
    so today when i was changing clothes i noticed a small (about a penny sized) red, dry patch! i was freaking out a little cause i saw the kardashians(dont judge haha) and how kim got psoriasis! but its only one patch that i see, it hasnt grown, i havent itched it and i dont have an urge to itch it. When i asked my mom if anyone in the family has/had it she said no. so do i have wrongworm or psoriasis or am i freaking out over nothing?
    and what should i do?
    please and thank you!
    oh and it is a little bit below my arm pit =P

    • ANSWER:
      Ringworm is a fungal infection on the skin.
      If it's ringworm, you'll have a circular rash, but with a whitish center. To get rid of ringworm, you need to use a topical anti-fungal cream such as Clobetasol. Use the cream twice daily, on the spot, for up to 7 to 10 days. After each application, wash your hands thoroughly! Try not to touch or scratch the spot, but if you do, wash your hands!

      Psoriasis is a common and chronic skin disease.
      A person with psoriasis generally has patches of raised red skin with thick silvery scales. The affected skin may be red and scaly or have pustules, depending on the type of psoriasis the individual has.
      There currently is no cure for psoriasis. Living with psoriasis is about educating yourself, learning & understanding your own personal triggers, and adjusting your lifestyle accordingly.

      For an accurate, professional diagnosis, you should see your doctor or consult with a certified dermatologist.


what is a psoriasis

Is Psoriasis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Could i have psoriasis?
    Okay so ive noticed the past few days i hae red dots on my legs.. They don't itch but there just kinda there... I have molescum but i donst look like it. Could i have psoriasis?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis occurs in different forms, but you will usually have thickened and red patches of skin. Your skin may feel itchy, and can sometimes feel painful or sore. If you have only very mild symptoms, you may not be aware you have it.
      Some types of psoriasis can affect your scalp and cause redness and flaking. It can also affect your fingernails, which can become pitted, thickened or loosened from the nail bed.
      If you have any of these symptoms, contact your GP

      Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and examine you. He or she may also ask you about your medical history.

      Your GP will probably be able to diagnose psoriasis from your symptoms and a physical examination. However, if your psoriasis is extensive or severe, if it's affecting your education or work, if it's not responding to treatment, or if your diagnosis is uncertain, your GP may refer you to a dermatologist (a doctor who specialises in identifying and treating skin conditions).

      If you have generalised pustular psoriasis or erythrodermic psoriasis, you may need to be admitted to hospital for treatment

      There is no cure for psoriasis. However, there are a number of treatments that can help relieve your symptoms.

      Topical treatments
      Your GP may prescribe you a medicated cream or ointment. The type and strength of topical treatment will depend on the type of psoriasis you have. Common types of preparations include those containing:

      coal tar - these preparations can reduce inflammation and scaling, and are often used in psoriasis affecting your scalp; however, they can be smelly and messy

      steroids - these preparations are often used for localised psoriasis (eg patches on your elbows or knees), but shouldn't be used if your psoriasis is quite widespread; stronger steroids can be used on your palms and soles, or your scalp

      vitamin D derivatives (such as calcipotriol or tacalcitol) - these preparations can be easier to use than some of the other products, but sometimes irritate your skin

      Oral medicines
      If topical treatments don't control your symptoms, or if your psoriasis is extensive, you may be prescribed medicines that you take as tablets, such as:

      methotrexate

      acitretin

      ciclosporin

      hydroxycarbamide

      These medicines work by suppressing your immune system, or by slowing down the production of skin cells. They are prescribed by a dermatologist.

  2. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis...?
    Does anyone know any good home remedies for head to toe psoriasis for my 15 year old daughter? Her body is literally covered from head to toe and the dermatologist has perscribed her a 5.00 medication that we can not afford at this time.

    • ANSWER:
      psoriasis really is heart breaking. I've had it covering my body almost head to toe for the past nine years. My doctor finally found that my psoriasis was due to too much strep in my body. He put me on tetracycline and it has all but completely gone away. Plus tetracycline is only about 10 bucks for a months worth. You might want to go back to the doc and have him run a strep test, this could answer a lot of questions. also, I went to a homeopathic doc for natural solutions. Milk thistle is great, cod liver oil, and biotin all these you can buy at walmart for under each. and they really help. I have also found that smashing a banana and adding warm oatmeat to it, stir it up, and rub your body down with it. Leave on the little flakes and oatmeal stuff on your body, sleep with it. In the morning you will wake up with less spots, I can almost promise!! Good luck and God bless!! I will pray for her. Psoriasis is so horrible

  3. QUESTION:
    tattoo with psoriasis?
    I am getting a tattoo soon from shoulder to elbow. i do have psoriasis but this area does not really flame up, tiny spots of it rarely does occur just lower arms and legs really does have it, i am going to get it , i just wondered if anyone has the same problem ,if any advice can be given. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      In my research in your topic, I came across this article from the National Psoriasis Foundation Forum. This is what one sufferer has to say :

      "When having tattoo done, any injury to the skin can result in something called the Koebner effect. The Koebner effect, which was named after the doctor who first described the phenomenon, basically means that an injury to a previously healthy patch of skin (say from a cat scratch or a shaving cut) can result in a new patch of psoriasis. It can also mean that an injury to an existing patch of psoriasis can cause that existing psoriasis lesion to get worse. Not every injury results in the Koebner effect and not ever psoriasis patient experiences the Koebner effect. I don't experience it, but it sounds like you do. "

      At the same time of research, I also came across a cream product that can help to relief your psoriasis. This is what the product advertised :

      "According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, between 150,000 and 260,000 new cases of Psoriasis are diagnosed each year?amounting to more than 5 million Americans - so you are not alone.

      If you have Psoriasis, getting relief for your skin is a top priority. While there is currently no cure, you can still get relief with a new product being advertised which is made with FDA-approved active ingredient. The product from Revitol Skin Care Product is called Dermasis Psoriasis Cream and it works to help control your skin symptoms in a smooth, non-greasy formula that absorbs quickly?and will not stain your clothes or skin.

      The product unique formulation of ingredients not only soothes and moisturizes your skin, but its active ingredient also helps control the scaling and flaking associated with Psoriasis to help your skin to heal naturally. "

      Hope this info will help you decide on getting the tattoo done as wel as help you to get some medicine to relief your icth, redness and scaling.

      Click on link to get more information on Dermasis Psoriasis Cream

  4. QUESTION:
    Home remedies for psoriasis??
    I have bad scalp psoriasis The OTC shampoos just don't so well for me anymore.One thing I've heard is epsom salt is good for psoriasis. I was thinking about mixing it with my regular shampoo. Has anyone ever tried this? I would appreciate any ideas for getting this stubborn stuff under control!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Natural Home Remedies for Psoriasis
      The discomfort of psoriasis can be relieved or lessened -- and many treatment options include common kitchen items found in your home. Just a little measuring, mixing and applying, and you're on your way to feeling better. Try the following home remedies when psoriasis causes problems.

      Home Remedies from the Cupboard

      Try a vinegar dip. Like aloe, apple cider vinegar has a long history of being used to soothe minor burns and other skin inflammations, and it's also a disinfectant. According to the Psoriasis Foundation, some folks with psoriasis have reported success in using it to treat their condition. As a liquid, it makes a great soak for affected fingernails and toenails -- just pour some in a bowl or cup and dip your nails in for a few minutes -- and apparently has even been effective when applied to plaques using cotton balls. It might just be worth a try. To prepare an apple cider vinegar compress, add 1 cup apple cider vinegar to 1 gallon water. Soak a washcloth in the mixture and apply it to the skin to ease itching.

      Pass the plastic wrap. Doctors have known for years that covering psoriasis lesions helps them go away. The cover-up strategy also helps to work medications into the skin and keep moisturizers in place longer. You can use regular kitchen plastic wrap, or you can buy special OTC patches (Actiderm). Apply your prescribed medication (be sure to confirm with your doctor first that the medication you are using can safely be used with an occlusive wrap) or moisturizer, then cover the area with the wrap. Don't keep the wrap on so long that the skin becomes soggy, since it's more susceptible to secondary infection that way; consult your doctor or pharmacist if you need more specific instructions.

      Pass the warm olive oil. If psoriasis scale is a problem on your scalp, warm a little olive oil and gently massage it into the scale to help soften and remove it. Then shampoo as usual and rinse thoroughly.

      Applying a thin layer of mineral oil will keep the skin moist.

      Applying a thin layer of mineral oil before hitting the beach can help
      enhance the sun's effects and keep the skin moist.

      Baking soda. To take the itch out of your scaly patches, mix 1 1/2 cups baking soda into 3 gallons water. Apply to your itchy patches with a washcloth soaked in the solution.

      Epsom salts. Add a handful of these healing salts to your bath. They'll keep swelling down and bring healing to your psoriasis.

      Mineral oil. This is another time-proven skin soother. Add a bit to your bath and soak your aching skin.

      Olive oil. An old favorite for easing psoriasis outbreaks is mixing 2 teaspoons olive oil with a large glass of milk and adding the concoction to your bathwater. Or if you are dealing with psoriasis on your scalp, massage some warm olive oil on your scaly patches. It will help soften the dead skin and make it easier to remove.

      Plastic wrap. After you douse your patches in moisturizer, wrap them in plastic wrap to help hold the moisture in. Change the wrapping often.

      Vegetable oil. Get in the tub and add a cupful of vegetable oil to your bath to ease your psoriasis.

      Home Remedies from the Spice Rack

      Cayenne. Capsaicin, the substance that gives cayenne pepper its heat, helps relieve pain and itching by blocking the communication system of sensory nerves. And studies have found that a cream containing capsaicin helped relieve itching and got rid of psoriasis plaques. Look for a cream containing .025 to .075 percent capsaicin -- any more than that and you'll risk burning your skin. It takes about a week for the cream to work. It may cause an initial, brief burning sensation when applied to plaques, and it must be kept away from the eyes and mucous membranes because it can produce an intense burning sensation that is certainly irritating. But you may want to try a little capsaicin-containing cream on a small psoriasis lesion to see if it helps.

      Home Remedies from the Supplement Shelf

      Fish oil. There have been numerous studies linking the omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil to improvement in psoriasis patches. The people in these studies had to take large oral doses of the supplement to show any results, but one study did find simply slathering fish oil on a psoriasis patch helped with healing. There are also commercial creams available that contain fish oils or derivatives of the oils. Whichever way you decide to use it, if you think fish oil might be worth a try, talk it over with your doctor.

      Home Remedies from the Medicine Cabinet

      Beat the tar out of it. Tar-containing shampoos, creams, and bath additives can help loosen psoriasis scales. Tar-containing bath oils are especially beneficial for psoriasis that is widespread on the body. These over-the-counter (OTC) products have been successful psoriasis treatments for many years.

      Bring on the salicylic acid. You may also want to use "sal acid," as salicylic acid preparations are sometimes called, to remove scales. Shampoos, creams, gels, and other topical psoriasis treatments containing salicylic acid are sold over the counter.

      Try OTC cortisone. Nonprescription topical medications containing 1 percent cortisone (Cortaid is one familiar brand) can also relieve the itching and irritation of psoriasis, especially for plaques that arise in skin folds or on the face. Be sure to get your doctor's OK before using one of these medications, though, and follow the package directions carefully; overuse of topical steroids such as cortisone can cause thinning and easy bruising of the skin.

      Apply aloe. The gel from the aloe vera plant has long been known for its skin-soothing properties and for helping the skin heal from minor wounds and burns. Research in the 1990s appears to have extended the plant's repertoire of possible benefits to include clearing psoriasis plaques. If you want to try aloe, you can buy the plant itself, split open one of its leaves, and smear the gel onto the plaques. For larger areas of plaque or a more portable balm, you can instead purchase a bottle of pure aloe vera gel at many pharmacies and health-food stores.

      Psoriasis is no picnic -- but its discomfort can be eased by preventing outbreaks through minor lifestyle changes and by treating outbreaks with a number of home remedy options, including baking soda, olive oil and mineral oil.

  5. QUESTION:
    psoriasis?!?!?!?
    today, i went to the doctors, because i have disgusting patches of scaly gross looking skin behind my ears, and in my scalp. The doctors told me that i have psoriasis. Does anyone else have it behind their ears or on their scalp. What exactaly is it? Is it a disease??? BEST ANSWER CHOSEN TOMORROW!!! (best answer gets 10 points)

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis (pronounced /s??ra??s?s/) (suh-RI-uh-sus) is a disorder which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. Psoriasis is hypothesized to be immune-mediated[1][2] and is not contagious.

      The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

      The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Several factors are thought to aggravate psoriasis. These include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking.[3] Individuals with psoriasis may suffer from depression and loss of self-esteem. As such, quality of life is an important factor in evaluating the severity of the disease. There are many treatments available but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

      Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) (L40.0) is the most common form of psoriasis. It affects 80 to 90% of people with psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis typically appears as raised areas of inflamed skin covered with silvery white scaly skin. These areas are called plaques.

      Flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis) (L40.83-4) appears as smooth inflamed patches of skin. It occurs in skin folds, particularly around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), the armpits, under an overweight stomach (pannus), and under the breasts (inframammary fold). It is aggravated by friction and sweat, and is vulnerable to fungal infections.

      Guttate psoriasis (L40.4) is characterized by numerous small round (teardrop-shaped) spots (differential diagnosis - pityriasis rosea - oval shape lesion). These numerous spots of psoriasis appear over large areas of the body, such as the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is associated with streptococcal throat infection.

      Pustular psoriasis (L40.1-3, L40.82) appears as raised bumps that are filled with non-infectious pus (pustules). The skin under and surrounding pustules is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localised, commonly to the hands and feet (palmoplantar pustulosis), or generalised with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body.

      Nail psoriasis (L40.86) produces a variety of changes in the appearance of finger and toe nails. These changes include discolouring under the nail plate, pitting of the nails, lines going across the nails, thickening of the skin under the nail, and the loosening (onycholysis) and crumbling of the nail.

      Psoriatic arthritis (L40.5) involves joint and connective tissue inflammation. Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint but is most common in the joints of the fingers and toes. This can result in a sausage-shaped swelling of the fingers and toes known as dactylitis. Psoriatic arthritis can also affect the hips, knees and spine (spondylitis). About 10-15% of people who have psoriasis also have psoriatic arthritis.

      Erythrodermic psoriasis (L40.85) involves the widespread inflammation and exfoliation of the skin over most of the body surface. It may be accompanied by severe itching, swelling and pain. It is often the result of an exacerbation of unstable plaque psoriasis, particularly following the abrupt withdrawal of systemic treatment. This form of psoriasis can be fatal, as the extreme inflammation and exfoliation disrupt the body's ability to regulate temperature and for the skin to perform barrier functions

      Hope this helps.

  6. QUESTION:
    Is there a cure for psoriasis?
    I'm 15 and I've has psoriasis my whole life, it's terrible. I have itchy, sticky red patches under my arms and behind my ears. My head is constantly itchy and flaking. The medications I'm using aren't working very well but my dermatologist doesn't want to give me a higher prescription. I'm tired of being uncomfortable, and I'm sick of being made fun of. What can I do? Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately there is no cure for psoriasis but there are lots of treatments that can help.

      You will be able to get other treatments than topical creams when you grow older. Usually the first step for a doctor is to prescribe topical steroid or cortisone creams that can clear the patches. Cortisone creams if used for a long period of time can make the skin ''thin'' so use them as much as your doctor told you.
      A great steroid cream that does not thin the skin is called Protopic. Works great and quick like cortisone ones. You could ask your doctor.
      As for the scalp there's an excellent lotion called Propiosalic. It's not oily at all so it's easy to put it on and leave it there if you want without washing your head. Clears my scalp within few days. It's also not addictive.
      Shampoos with tar in them are also great. Massage the scalp with that shampoo well, rinse and then use your normal shampoo.

      Other than that you can try phototherapy. ( Uvb and Puva ) Ask your doctor. You kinda know from the start if that treatment will work for you if sun exposure mostly at summer seems to help your psoriasis.

      They are really close on finding better drugs that will help, like the biological ( injections example : Enbrel,Humira,Stellara ) so just be patient.

      The great thing about having psoriasis now in 2012 is that more and more people know about the disease. They know that it's genetic and not contagious so that's great. In America only more than 7 million people have psoriasis and after all those campaigns about the disease almost everyone knows what it is now.

      You have to take care of your psoriasis like every girl takes care of their skin and face but do not obsess about it. Anxiety triggers psoriasis. It's like a vicious circle. You get anxious about your psoriasis , your psoriasis gets worse, you get more anxious and so on.

      I am 28 years old now ( woman ) and when I was 15 ( with psoriasis ) only a few people knew what psoriasis is. But now, when someone sees a patch on me they go '' Oh you got psoriasis'' And if I start to explain they go '' Oh yea I know a friend of mine has it, it's ok'' Most of them don't even pay attention to my patches. My coworkers had no idea I had it for years. Psoriasis patients think that everyone will notice but they don't actually. If they don't know about the dermatitis you could explain if you want to but I 'm pretty sure they know what it is.

      I had psoriasis kinda all over my body back then and I still had lots of friends and boyfriends that didn't matter at all. I was amazed to see that I was the only once who cared about the condition. So there's nothing to be anxious for.

      Sun and sea salt helps a lot to clear the psoriasis and keep your skin like this for months so try to go to the sea every day at summer.

  7. QUESTION:
    any home remedies for psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis on my knee and I tried using vaseline it only kept it from drying too fast but never relieved the itch which causes it to spread if you scratch it so I was just wondering if anyone know f anything I can use to help get rid of this thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      the most important step in controlling psoriasis is to keep skin well moisturized. A big problem with psoriasis is scale buildup, and moisturizers are extremely effective at preventing this. Plain petroleum jelly is a very effective moisturizer. But if you're buying a commercial moisturizer, those that contain lactic acid, such as LactiCare, seem to work better. Also, Eucerin cream works well as a moisturizer for those with psoriasis.

      Moisturize after bathing. To get the most from your moisturizer, apply it within three minutes after leaving the shower or bathtub. We recommend that you pat yourself dry and apply the moisturizer liberally all over your body--not just on plaques. That's because even 'clear' skin in people with psoriasis is drier than in people who don't have psoriasis. It's thought that little cracks on dry skin might encourage more psoriasis.

      Soak up the sun. Many psoriasis patients are prescribed a specific regimen of ultraviolet light treatments. Getting artificial sunlight from a special lamp or tanning booth can help. An easier and less expensive method is simply to hit the Great Outdoors. "We know that exposure to sunlight is extremely helpful for treating psoriasis," says David Kalin, M.D., a family practitioner in Largo, Florida. A moderate amount of sunlight enhances the production of vitamin D, which may be effective in controlling psoriasis.

      But don't soak up the booze. Doctors are still trying to find out for sure why alcohol exacerbates psoriasis. They suspect that alcohol increases activity of a certain kind of white blood cell that's found in psoriasis patients but not in other people. (But it's also possible that drinkers are just more highly stressed and therefore more prone to psoriasis.)

      "Alcohol is a definite problem," according to Stephen M. Purcell, D.O., chairman of the Department of Dermatology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and assistant clinical professor at Hahnemann University School of Medicine in Philadelphia. "It's best to not drink at all if you have psoriasis."

      Spice up your bath. Bathing is often a catch-22 for those with psoriasis. That's because soaking in warm water helps soften psoriasis plaques, but it sometimes dries skin and worsens itching. "One way to get the benefits of a bath without the dryness is to add a couple of capfuls of vegetable oil to your bath," says McNeal. "The best way to do it is to get in the tub first, so your body soaks up the water, and then add the oil." Another alternative suggested by McNeal: Mix two teaspoons of olive oil in a large glass of milk and add that to your bath.

      Be extra careful stepping out of the tub, since oils can make surfaces very slippery. (Be sure to scrub the tub afterward.)

      Head to the kitchen to soothe that itchin'. To soothe itching caused by dry skin and psoriasis, dissolve 1/3 cup of baking soda in a gallon of water. Soak a washcloth in the solution, wring it out, and then it apply to the itchy area. Or add a cup of apple cider kitchen vinegar to the water and apply that to the skin.

      Cover the cracks with cow cream. If your skin is cracked because of psoriasis--which can cause itching and more plaques--do what dairymen do. "They found that Bag Balm, a product originally used to relieve cracking in cow udders, worked just as well on their cracked hands," says McNeal. "Then people with psoriasis found it worked great on their dry or cracked skin." Bag Balm is available at most feed stores; some drugstores may be able to order it.

      Take care of mind and body. Stress is a known trigger of psoriasis, so managing your mental state--through exercise, relaxation techniques or whatever mellows you out--is one way to keep your condition under control.

      Guard against infection and injury. "Infection may lead to an outbreak or worsen your condition, so it's important to try to avoid infectious disease," says Dr. Kalin. New lesions may also appear on injured skin, so try to avoid cuts and scrapes.

      Watch what you eat. "Although there are no specific links that have been proven, it appears a diet high in oily fish--such as tuna, mackerel, sardines and salmon--helps reduce the itching and inflammation of psoriasis," says Dr. Lowe.

      Avoid certain foods. "Some anecdotal reports suggest patients do better when they reduce or eliminate tomatoes and tomato-based dishes--possibly because of high acidity levels," says Dr. Kalin. "Also, some of my patients with psoriasis have noticed a decrease in plaques by avoiding or limiting their intake of pork products and other fatty meats as well as caffeine."

      Go electric. If you have plaques on your face, neck, legs or other areas that require shaving, use an electric razor instead of a blade. "An electric razor won't cut skin as easily, and every time you cut yourself, you risk new lesions," says

  8. QUESTION:
    Help with psoriasis?
    I was diagnosed with guttate psoriasis. It's all over my back and stomach. It makes my back look old and wrinkly like when I'm only 17. Does anyone have help to stop the itching and keep my skin looking as young as I am? Any help will be greatly appreciated, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      This type of psoriasis may be treated at home in most mild-to-moderate cases. Keeping the skin moist will prevent extra irritation. Thick moisturizers applied after a bath to keep in moisture and soften the skin are helpful.

      Over the counter topical steroids may help to reduce inflammation and itching.

      Guttate psoriasis may be inherited. Those with a family history of psoriasis have an increased chance of having the disease. Some people carry genes that make them more likely to develop psoriasis.

      People with guttate psoriasis may have a significantly higher number of human leukocyte antigens BW17, B13, or CW6 than others. Psoriasis is the only disease associated with the human leukocyte antigen C gene expression.

      Antigens are proteins on the surface of bacteria, viruses, or material foreign to the body. The body's immune system recognizes the type of antigen present and makes an antibody to destroy the bacteria, virus, or foreign material.

      When the body has a streptococcal infection, it produces antibodies to streptolysin-O that is on the bacterial cell. People with an excess of human leukocyte antigen B13 may not be able to produce enough antibodies to the streptolysin-O, which may be associated with the high rate of guttate psoriasis in these individuals.

      Guttate psoriasis may not be preventable. However, complications or further flare-ups may be reduced by avoiding anything that triggers a psoriasis outbreak. For example, anyone with psoriasis should try to minimize all forms of skin trauma, such as scratching or vigorous rubbing, which may lead to new psoriatic lesions on previously unaffected areas. This is known as the Koebner phenomenon.

  9. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis.......?
    do you know any thing that can help with Psoriasis? what do you do when it hurts a lot?

    • ANSWER:
      I had psoriasis around my junior-senior year of high school. It was horrible, it just came out of nowhere on the back of my legs and my elbows and would not go away no matter what I did it seemed. I lived in Ohio at the time so the cold weather definitely did not help. Then I went to Florida and one of my parent's friends reccomended DermaZinc spray. I bought it and that mixed with the sun made it get a lot better, but still not gone. I moved to Arizona that year though and continued using the spray (just a couple squirts on infected areas after getting out of the shower), i moisturized the areas with the really thick eucerin lotion that comes in a tub, and I also started tanning in tanning beds frequently (like every other day) as my skin got darker, the psoriarsis got lighter, until eventually it dissappeared all together! I haven't had any kind of psoriasis for like 6 years now. So that's what I would reccomend: live in a warm climate (if you can), try to go tanning when possible (the UVA or UVB rays are actually really good for the psoriasis), moisturize daily with heavy duty mosturizer, and use this spray! It worked for me really well.

  10. QUESTION:
    Homeopathic cures for Psoriasis?
    Do you know of any alternate means of clearing Psoriasis - something other than steroids?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is a systemic problem -- not just a local one. And it's not something you can treat yourself with remedies from the health food store. You need to see a Homeopathic doctor in order to find out what is causing your psoriasis, and then he or she will be able to start you on a program to cure what is causing it and any other health issues you may have.
      I have seen numerous cases of not only psoriasis, but eczema and rosacea cured through Homeopathy, and there are stacks of clinical cases that Homeopaths have access to that reveal many thousands of cured cases. In fact, Homeopathy is the only medical system that can do this.
      Conventional medicine doesn't work: it just dispenses steroidal drugs and creams that may temporarily suppress the skin issues.
      There are serious side-effects from taking steroids, including liver damage.
      Homeopathy has no side effects and is safe, gentle and effective.

  11. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis(sp) and hair?
    I have psoriasis on my scalp, welli think it is, and i was wondering whats the best way to get rid of it, without seeing medical help? Any certain kind of shamoo i should use?

    • ANSWER:
      Scalp psoriasis
      How is it treated?

      Many treatment options can help control scalp psoriasis and its symptoms. Sometimes scalp psoriasis will clear on its own (a spontaneous remission), or it can remain on the scalp for long periods of time.
      It is important to select scalp treatments that are agreeable to you. Treatments should never be worse than the psoriasis itself. Consider your lifestyle, available time and the cost to help you decide among the options.

      Tar products and salicylic acid are generally sufficient for treating very mild scalp psoriasis. More severe scalp psoriasis may require persistence and experimentation to find an effective treatment plan. Treatments include topical medications (applied to the skin) and occasionally ultraviolet (UV) light. Treatments are often combined and rotated because a person's psoriasis can become resistant to medications after repeated use. Systemic (oral or injected) psoriasis treatments are not commonly used just for scalp psoriasis, but they may be tried if psoriasis is present elsewhere on the body and/or the psoriasis is severe.

      Treatment schedules
      Scalp treatments must be repeated until you get adequate control of your lesions. This can take up to eight weeks or longer.
      Once you achieve clearing, or a level of acceptable clearing, you may be able to keep psoriasis from coming back by using a tar shampoo or other medicated shampoo daily or twice a week. Moisturizing the scalp may also help.

      Tar products
      Tar products, usually available without a prescription, are widely used to treat scalp psoriasis. You will be able to find over-the-counter (OTC) tar shampoos, creams, gels, oils, ointments and soaps. Tar also can be prescribed by your doctor in a variety of strengths. It may be used as a single treatment or in combination with other treatments.
      While tar is an effective medication, it can stain bedding and gray or white hair, and has a strong odor.

      There are two kinds of tars: coal tar and wood tar. Coal tar is the most common form for treating psoriasis, but some wood tar products, especially soaps (such as Grandpa's Pine Tar soap), can treat scalp psoriasis. Soaps are less expensive and typically last longer than shampoos.

      Coal tar is available in OTC products in concentrations from 1% to 5%, although higher concentrations are sometimes prescribed. Refined coal tars, such as liquor carbonis detergens, commonly referred to as LCD, have less of an odor and may cause less staining. Unfortunately, refined tars are not as strong, and may be harder to find.

      How do you use tar on the scalp?
      Massage tar shampoo into the scalp and leave it on for about five minutes before rinsing it off to allow for maximum absorption of the tar. Shampoo or conditioner can reduce the smell of the tar shampoo and make the hair more manageable.

      Tar gels, creams, solutions and lotions can be massaged into the scalp and left on overnight. These tar products are used for psoriasis on other parts of the body as well.

      Effectiveness will vary for each person. Tests have shown tar shampoos to be superior to shampoos without tar in treating scaling.

      Topical steroids
      Topical corticosteroid medications (steroids) can be effective against scalp psoriasis. These prescription medications come in solutions, gels, creams, lotions, sprays, ointments and foam.
      Topical steroids range from very mild to very strong (potent). Normally, strong steroids can be used safely for scalp psoriasis, but they should not be used continuously for long periods of time. A two-week cycle of treatment is commonly recommended for strong steroids. In addition, they should not be used under a dressing or covering (occlusion). Follow your doctor's instructions carefully.

      Abruptly stopping steroid treatments can cause a rebound (worsening, if stopped too quickly) flare of psoriasis. Slowly reducing the use of steroids can help avoid a rebound flare. Do not use steroid preparations on your face and other sensitive skin areas, such as under the breasts and genitals, unless directed by your doctor. Avoid getting steroids in your eyes.

      Several topical steroid prescription medications are designed specifically for treating scalp psoriasis. These formulas are water- and alcohol-based, which makes it easier to wash them out after treatment.

      Cormax Scalp Application, Clobex Shampoo, Temovate Scalp Application and Olux are four scalp products that contain clobetasol propionate, one of the strongest topical steroids. Clobetasol propionate can be very effective in clearing psoriasis.

      Olux and Luxiq are foam-based prescription scalp medications that contain steroids. Foam-based applicators resemble styling mousse cans. The foam turns into liquid when applied to the skin and is absorbed quickly, leaving little residue.

      Some scalp psoriasis cases become resistant to topical steroids. If this happens, you can switch to other scalp treatments, such as anthralin, Dovonex, Tazorac or tar. It can take several months before topical steroid medications will work again for skin that has become resistant.

      Intralesional steroid scalp injections
      Sometimes doctors inject scalp lesions with steroid medications. This is done only when the scalp psoriasis is mild and involves a few areas. It would not be appropriate to inject many plaques. Steroid injections are given sparingly because the medication can be absorbed into the system.
      Anthralin
      Anthralin is an older, prescription medication that may work for some people with scalp psoriasis. The typical use of anthralin for scalp treatment is 30 minutes with either 0.25% or 0.5% anthralin. Anthralin can be left on the scalp for as little as 10 minutes and then washed off. Higher concentrations are applied for shorter periods of time. This is called Short Contact Anthralin Therapy, or SCAT.
      Anthralin can stain the skin and can cause irritation in some people. Remove anthralin from the scalp by rubbing the shampoo toward the back of the head to avoid getting anthralin on your forehead or in your eyes.

      Psoriatec is the brand name of a 1% anthralin cream that may limit staining because the medication is released from tiny capsules only at skin temperature. Rinse Psoriatec from the scalp, clothing, towels or bathroom fixtures with cool or lukewarm water to prevent these capsules from breaking down; this may prevent the staining and irritation usually associated with anthralin.

      CuraStain (available through a pharmacist as triethanolamine) is a product that may help control the staining associated with anthralin.

      Dovonex
      Dovonex (also known by its generic name calcipotriene) is a prescription topical vitamin D3 derivative that comes in a water- and oil-based scalp solution. After applying Dovonex at night, cover the scalp with a shower cap or plastic bag before going to bed. Confine Dovonex to the scalp because it irritates unaffected skin, particularly the face. You may wish to test a small area before applying it to the entire scalp. Avoid contact with your eyes.
      Tazorac
      Tazorac (also known by its generic name tazarotene) is a topical vitamin A derivative that comes in a cream or gel form for the treatment of psoriasis. The gel absorbs more rapidly than the cream, while the cream may be less irritating for people with dry or sensitive skin.
      Apply Tazorac in a thin film to lesions on the scalp or hairline. The medication may dry out the skin; to reduce irritation, apply moisturizers 30 minutes before Tazorac is used. However, the skin should be dry when treated. Tazorac is safe to use on your face, but it should not be applied around the eyes. Do not cover treated skin.

      Overnight application of Tazorac is recommended. Let the medication air dry on the scalp before going to bed, so you don't spread it on your pillow and face as you sleep.

      Antimicrobial therapy
      Scalp psoriasis can get worse if the scalp becomes infected with bacteria or yeast. If crusting of the scalp along with scaling occurs and/or the lymph nodes in your neck are enlarged, your doctor may prescribe antimicrobial treatment. Mild scalp psoriasis also may respond to treatment with antifungal shampoos such as Nizoral, a prescription shampoo that helps reduce yeast organisms. It may require the use of an antifungal shampoo once or twice a week to maintain results.
      Ultraviolet light
      Hair blocks UV light treatments from reaching the scalp. However, better results can be achieved with conventional UV units if you part your hair in many rows, if you have very thin hair or if you shave your head. Hand-held devices called UV combs are available to deliver a higher intensity of UV light. Natural sunlight may also help if the hair is very thin or the head is shaved.
      See phototherapy and sun and water therapy for more information.

      Medicated shampoos
      Many coal tar and non-coal tar medicated shampoos for treating scalp lesions are on the market (click here for listing). Leave shampoos on the scalp as directed and rinse them out thoroughly.
      Remember, medicated shampoos are designed for the scalp, not the hair. You may want to use a regular cosmetic shampoo or conditioner after your scalp treatment to reduce the smell of the medicated shampoo and make your hair more manageable.

      Systemic treatments for psoriasis
      If moderate to severe psoriasis is present on other skin sites in addition to the scalp, your doctor may prescribe systemic psoriasis medications (medications that are taken by mouth or injection). The most common include methotrexate, oral retinoids, cyclosporine and biologic medications. They may help clear scalp psoriasis, and are only appropriate for very severe cases.
      Systemic psoriasis medications have side effects that must be weighed in relationship to their benefits. Hair loss can be a side effect of certain systemic psoriasis treatments. Ordinarily, the hair will grow back when the medication is stopped.

  12. QUESTION:
    how serious is psoriasis?
    I'm not exactly sure if thats what i have on my head, but i have all of the symptoms of psoriasis, so how serious is it, i read joint pains or arthritis can be caused from it, is that possible?! could my knee pay be involved with the scabs on my head? and how serious is all of this? should i tell my dad or can i just my the meds on my own? are there any home remedies for it?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is caused by your immune system. Normally the skin cells on your scalp are cast off and replaced about once a month, but with psoriasis, the affected skin spots can be reproducing about every week. The new skin cells are produced more rapidly than the old skin cells can be discarded, and it causes itchy, red bumps.

      The bumps are itchy because histamines are being produced by your immune system to fight off the attack it thinks is happening on your skin. The area is red because the blood vessels expand and pump in more blood to sustain the increase in cell production.

      Joint pain can be caused by psoriatic arthritis, which is caused when the immune system begins attacking and inflaming the cartilage between joints. It is possible for joint pain to begin before psoriasis becomes apparent on the skin, but it is rare. Your doctor can do a simple blood test to determine whether or not you have arthritis.

      As for the psoriasis you have on your scalp, the best over-the-counter remedy is to buy a coal tar based shampoo. You can find them in almost any store in the Head n Shoulders section of the shampoo aisle. Neutrogena produces one called T-Gel, I believe. Coal tar retards cell formation, and will help with the itch.

      If the itchy spots are particularly bad, you can buy a salicilic acid based shampoo to use before using the coal tar shampoo. Salicilic acid loosens and softens the skin if the spots become hardened. I think a company called Scalpacin makes a whole line of psoriasis products.

      Psoriasis is not an end-of-the-world affair. About 10% of Americans have psoriasis. If the condition worsens though, you should see a dermatologist, as they can prescribe tougher medication.

      Hope that helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis...?
    Does anybody else have got psoriasis?
    I'm 16 and I've got psoriasis on my scalp for about two years now. Sometimes it's not that bad and other times...
    I'd like to know how you feel about your psoriasis, because, it's not that easy to deal with sometimes...
    Oh yeah, and how big is the possibility that I'll have it on other places?
    Oh yeah, I also got it a little bit in my ears, but not really bad

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, Just to let you know its a common problem amongst teens. Im 18 now but wen I was 14-16 i had i really bad on my head, and my body. I was really good at hiding it and was very self concious. I never did any PE at school because it ment getting changed and people seeing me. I think its easy to become self concious because people dont understand psoriasis. I used to say it was ezsma as people know and understand what that is. As soon as you say psoriasis they would give me a weird look. It important to remember not to stress about it as it can make the condition worse. There are many treatments avalible. One I found very useful was coicois for the scalp. It stops the flaking.

      As for the chances of you getting it in other places well it depends on the type of psoriasis. Some people just get it in one specific place such as an elbow but it can just one day apear somewhere else. There is a possibility that after pubity has finished the psoriasis will disapear forever. But at this moment in time your just going to have to try and cope with it. Remember not to be self concious :D let people know what it is and smile

  14. QUESTION:
    psoriasis?
    i have psoriasis it is kind of like craddle cap or dandruff but more severe and i get it on my head and everywhere else im thirteen and usually old people get this is there any remedys you have for psoriasis

    • ANSWER:
      Honey I've had Psoriasis since I was 5 years old. It's not just an "old folks" skin disease, I'm afraid. It is actually been proven that it is hereditary, meaning you could have inherited it from someone else in your family.

      There is no cure for it, only treatments. There is a shot on the market right now that has shown promising results, but it is very expensive. It is called Enbrel. I cannot afford this shot, so my routine to control my Psoriasis is to use the following products:

      Hair shampoo: TGel medicated shampoo
      Skin Lotion: Elocon lotion OR Cucumber/Aloe lotion
      Skin cleansing: Green Alcohol also known as Witch Hazel

      For the Psoriasis in your scalp, use the TGel shampoo at least 3 times a week.

      For the Psoriasis on your skin, wash your skin with a moisturizing soap and water. Use a cotton ball and put green alcohol on it and wipe it over your skin. Then apply a light coating of Elocon lotion OR Cucumber/Aloe lotion.
      Do this 2 or 3 times a day if you can. It will help control the itching and flaking.

      Good luck, sweetie! (^_^)

  15. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis?!?!!?
    i have psoriasis and i was wondering about how long it takes for sunlight/UV rays to clear up areas where psoriasis has turned red and scaly. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Sunlight alone will not clear your psoriasis but it is beneficial as it creates endogenous vitamin D.
      No medication or alternative medicines work, nor does any miracle creams. At best they only treat the symptoms, you have to eliminate what is causing the problems in the first place. Psoriasis is not viral nor is it contagious if it was you would have been isolated. So let use facts that are well established and ones that you yourself can check. Your autoimmune system malfunctioning, another word not coping.
      Celiac disease (gluten intolerance) l for one would doubt if l will ever meet a psoriasis sufferer who isn't a celiac. Just type into yahoo search bar "celiac psoriasis" There are many celiac related diseases associated with psoriasis sufferers.
      Check out www.celiac.com. The citric as in processed foods as food acid or citric acid etc. does play a role in your psoriasis. If we took a sample of your psoriasis and normal skin the one big difference that is noticed is the calcium content. This is called calcium protease and the other trigger is called acrylamide. Hence
      Acrylamide calcium protease/psoriasis.
      Where are you getting acrylamide from? Acrylamide is formed in foods that are heated like bread, potato chips, cereals etc. Just type into yahoo search bar "acrylamide"
      Only by removing these foods from your diet can you avoid having psoriasis. I had plague psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis for years, l understand how cruel it can be. l can only show you how to beat psoriasis, it is really up to you. By simply changing your Diet Psoriasis Is Avoidable. If you wish to find out more or anyone for that matter l have a website. As l have typed just before l know how cruel psoriasis is, no one should have to suffer from it. All the information is free l have nothing to sell on the website only to share. Any one can e-mail me stirling_strauss@yahoo.com
      warm regards.

  16. QUESTION:
    help needed for psoriasis?
    My boyfriend has very bad psoriasis and his skin always itches and swells up really badly. Does anyone know what can help him??? He uses vaseline to help relieve the dryness...
    we live very far from any ocean...

    • ANSWER:
      Specialist dermatologists generally treat psoriasis in steps based on the severity of the disease, size of the areas involved, type of psoriasis, and the patient's response to initial treatments. This is sometimes called the "1-2-3" approach. In step 1, medicines are applied to the skin (topical treatment). Step 2 uses ultraviolet light treatments (phototherapy). Step 3 involves taking medicines by mouth or injection that treat the whole immune system (called systemic therapy).

      Over time, affected skin can become resistant to treatment, especially when topical corticosteroids are used. Also, a treatment that works very well in one person may have little effect in another. Thus, doctors often use a trial-and-error approach to find a treatment that works, and they may switch treatments periodically (for example, every 12 to 24 months) if a treatment does not work or if adverse reactions occur.
      Treatments applied directly to the skin may improve its condition. Doctors find that some patients respond well to ointment or cream forms of corticosteroids, vitamin D3, retinoids, coal tar, or anthralin. Bath solutions and moisturizers may be soothing, but they are seldom strong enough to improve the condition of the skin. Therefore, they usually are combined with stronger remedies.

      Bath solutions
      People with psoriasis may find that adding oil when bathing, then applying a moisturizer, soothes their skin. Also, individuals can remove scales and reduce itching by soaking for 15 minutes in water containing a coal tar solution, oiled oatmeal, Epsom salts, or Dead Sea salts.

      Moisturizers
      When applied regularly over a long period, moisturizers have a soothing effect. Preparations that are thick and greasy usually work best because they seal water in the skin, reducing scaling and itching.

      Light therapy
      Natural ultraviolet light from the sun and controlled delivery of artificial ultraviolet light are used in treating psoriasis.

      Sunlight
      Much of sunlight is composed of bands of different wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) light. When absorbed into the skin, UV light suppresses the process leading to disease, causing activated T cells in the skin to die. This process reduces inflammation and slows the turnover of skin cells that causes scaling. Daily, short, nonburning exposure to sunlight clears or improves psoriasis in many people. Therefore, exposing affected skin to sunlight is one initial treatment for the disease.

  17. QUESTION:
    Question about Psoriasis?
    I was diagnosed with Guttate Psoriasis when I was in kindergarten, but now i'm not so sure if that's what I had. Back then, I got strep throat and shortly after I had red spots ALL over my body that looked like chicken pox. It took several months to get rid of, and I haven't had an outbreak that bad since then. But NOW I feel like I might have plaque Psoriasis as well. Over the summer, I developed these pink dry bumps with white centers on my chest and upper stomach. I then got it on my eyebrows, arms, and elbows as well. The ones on my chest have all formed together into a big flaky rash, and its bothering me. Is it possible to have two different types of Psoriasis? Does it sound like I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes totally normal. You are diagnosed with Psoriasis period. At the time you had guttate psoriasis. This is usually how it starts. Patches and bigger marks appear later on. You can also have both of them at the same time. Mine started as guttate psoriasis as well, after couple of years or more I started to get big patches also. So I had small dots almost all over my body and bigger patches on my knees, legs and some other areas.
      This can change again. The diagnosis is Psoriasis but psoriasis changes through time. Lot's of people end up with just one or two big patches in their arms or legs when they are older and no other mark in their whole body.

      So the type of Psoriasis does not really matter. Plaque psoriasis is just more difficult to treat. Small psoriasis marks/dots can disappear in 2-3 days if using a proper cortisone cream, but bigger patches need time.
      The mechanism and the genes involved with psoriasis are the same for any type of psoriasis.

      It's like when you acne problems, sometimes you get cysts and if you get them a lot the diagnosis for the time is ''cystic acne ''. That does not mean that it's going to be like this for ever or that you won't get just whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules etc.

      Talk to your dermatologist about this and take a proper treatment.
      For auto immune chronic diseases like psoriasis knowledge about the condition is key to find the proper treatment for you.

  18. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis..?
    i think i may have psoriasis....?!

    I have a small spot on my elbow, and a bit on my upper leg...

    My brother and sister both have it quite bad...

    I noticed the small spot on my elbow about 6 months ago... (me and my long term girlfriend had just split up) could that be the cause....

    What do i need to do..?

    get it checked out by the doc' or can i get summut from a chemist/pharmacy..

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      Currently, there is no cure for psoriasis. However, there are many treatment options that can clear psoriasis for a period of time. Each treatment has advantages and disadvantages, and what works for one patient may not be effective for another. Board-certified dermatologists have the medical training and experience needed to determine the most appropriate treatments for each patient.

      Diagnosis
      There are several forms of psoriasis, and each form has unique characteristics that allow dermatologists to visually identify psoriasis to determine what type, or types, of psoriasis is present. Sometimes a skin biopsy will be performed to confirm the diagnosis.

      To choose the most appropriate treatment method, dermatologists consider several factors:

      Type of psoriasis

      Severity (the amount of skin affected)

      Where psoriasis is located

      Patient?s age and medical history

      Effects psoriasis has on patient?s overall physical and emotional
      well-being

      Types of Treatment
      Psoriasis treatments fall into 3 categories:

      Topical (applied to the skin) ? Mild to moderate psoriasis

      Phototherapy (light, usually ultraviolet, applied to the skin) ? Moderate to severe psoriasis

      Systemic (taken orally or by injection or infusion) ? Moderate, severe or disabling psoriasis

      While each of these therapies is effective, there are also drawbacks.

      Some topicals are messy and may stain clothing and skin. Phototherapy can require 2 to 5 weekly visits to a dermatologist?s office or psoriasis clinic for several weeks. Many of the systemic medications have serious side effects and must be combined or rotated with other therapies to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects. Research is being conducted to find therapies that provide safe, effective, easy-to-use treatment options that provide long-term relief.

  19. QUESTION:
    Is this why I have psoriasis?
    When I was 12 I was playing cricket with my buddies and I hit the ball too hard and it broke this ladie's car window. We ran away ASAP and never told anyone what we had done. A few weeks later I was diagnosed with psoriasis, and today at the age of 43, I still have it! Did I get psoriasis as a punishment for breaking the woman's car window and not owing up to it?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is also called calcium protease. Your immune system is malfunctioning( not coping)with what you are eating. (Your body does not produce calcium...) Gluten intolerance plays a big part...
      why not research for yourself, try typing "calcium protease-psoriasis" in search box. It is your diet, most likely processed foods with citric or food acid (these are high in calcium content). Got doubts want to see your psoriasis flare up just take Calcium Ascorbate "vitamin C" or Ascorbic Acid Vitamin C. Do not say l didn't warn you but it will have an effect on you so go easy .....
      l had psoriasis to 60% to my body l haven't any more. l learnt that most processed foods, soft drinks,etc affected me. Really it's all about eating healthy.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you die from psoriasis?
    Ok so my dad says his friend got told by his doctor that he doesn't much more time to live because of psoriasis. Appearently his symptoms are constant pain in his joints and other parts of his body. Can you actually die from it? If so how? I thought it was just a skin condition.....

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis in auto immune not contagious disease caused by over working genes. Psoriasis is just on the skin. White flakes ( dead skin cells ) exactly like Dandruff but but not only on the scalp.

      Your dad's friend has Psoriatic Arthritis.

      Psoriatic arthritis is a painful, inflammatory condition of the joints that can occur occur in association with psoriasis of the skin. Up to 40% of those that have skin psoriasis also have signs of psoriatic arthritis.
      Symptoms of this disease come and go, however it is a lifelong condition that may result in severe damage to the joints. Joint deformity as well as changes in X-rays are be found in about 40% of people that have psoriatic arthritis.
      People with severe psoriatic arthritis have been reported to have a shorter lifespan than average. and this correlates with the severity of the joint disease.

      There are biological drugs that help a lot with the condition ( injections ).

  21. QUESTION:
    Is psoriasis heriditary?
    My dad had kidney failure before I was born, he's fine now! But he had psoriasis induced by kidney failure. I heard that its heriditary, in my case will it be? I'm 15 and he got it at like 25. Will I get it then?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by over working genes that keep producing skin cells so we end up with white flakes (dead skin cells ) on the skin. It's similar to Dandruff and it has nothing to do with blood like mentioned in another answer.

      We though that it's all about the immune system for so many years but after recent researches we found out that the problem is in the skin itself! Take a look at this research :

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120419121436.htm

      They are trying to identify all the genes involved ( reproduction or skin cells/psoriasis ) in order to find out what is really going on, because things for psoriasis are not clear.

      Scientists tested a lot of people with psoriasis and also their parents and relatives to find out if the genes that are already identified are on everyone. But lots of kids had the gene and their parents didn't.
      That means that psoriasis might not be hereditary as we thought for so many years.

      No one can tell for sure though because when genes are involved and we are talking about an auto immune disease which is not clear we don't have much to come to a conclusion. But this new research is good news ( I guess ).

      I have had psoriasis since I was 15 ( 28 now ). No one else in my family has it. No grandparent with psoriasis, no aunts ankles etc. Just me.

      Even if you have the genes this does not mean that you are going to have active psoriasis. It might never appear. Or it can appear only in a few spots, like elbows/knees and scalp.
      No need to worry. We don't need extra stress in our lives ;-)

  22. QUESTION:
    Scalp psoriasis cause?
    My condition of scalp psoriasis started last year in September. It disappeared when winter 2012 ended (with the help of medicated shampoo). And now, its back. My parents believe it was the combination of summer weather and concealing my head with a hat, beanie, etc. Not sure i really believed that at first, but is it possible? Could the excessive concealing of my head and hot weather be the cause, or is it still unknown and remains uncurable but treatable like scientists say?

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by genes. It has no cure, only treatments that can help as soon as you keep doing them.

      What causes all those flakes and psoriasis patches? In normal people psoriasis free, skin cells reproduce once every 30 days approximately. In psoriasis the skin cells reproduce themselves once every 1 or 2 days, so all the dead skin cells ( flakes ) remain on the skin and keep building up day by day.
      This is happening cause of over working genes involved in the production of skin cells.

      Stress, anxiety, toxins from food or other products we use everyday, fever, cold/flu or other conditions trigger psoriasis.

      The sun and sea swimming during the summer helps to totally clear psoriasis most of the times. It's not the hat you are wearing and the steam inside or anything. Psoriasis is getting worse in winter in 80% of patients. The more you swim the better. If you get to go for vacations for enough days of live next to the sea you can clear your psoriasis and keep it clear for months during the winter.

      Psoriasis shampoos are not for treatment but for maintenance.
      Avoid head and shoulders, ultrex etc. because they are harsh for the scalp and it's ph. They are so strong that the scalp gets used to them and they stop working. Worst part is that the interfere with the scalp ph and no other treatment will work in the future.

      Use shampoos with tar in them, not harsh at all and they work great.
      During the winter you need to use a proper lotion treatment to keep your scalp clean if psoriasis appears.
      I've tried almost every product available and I've found that Propiosalic works the best. It has salicylic acid which clears the scalp fast.
      You apply it 1 or 2 times a day and you don't need to wash your hair at all afterwards. It dries out in about half an hour and it's not noticeable. Clears up the scalp ( even for severe scalp psoriasis ) in a few days to a week if applied everyday or every other day. (under 4 dollars ) Ask your pharmacist or your dermatologist.

      You can then keep using the tar shampoo to help it stay clean for long.

      Gluck

  23. QUESTION:
    Wot is scalp psoriasis?is it curable?
    wot is scalp psoriasis??my doctor told me tat i am suffering from this disease...is it something to worry about?i am really worried about my hair..i've heard it causes temporary hair loss..but some people say tat it can lead to permanent hair loss as well..nd moreover my doc said tat it is not curable..but it can be controlled with proper medication nd rt treatment...

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis (pronounced /s??ra??s?s/) is a non-contagious disorder which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes on a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. In contrast to eczema, psoriasis is more likely to be found on the extensor aspect of the joint.

      The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

      The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Factors that may aggravate psoriasis include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking.[1] There are many treatments available, but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

      Treatment:

      Treatment

      There can be substantial variation between individuals in the effectiveness of specific psoriasis treatments. Because of this, dermatologists often use a trial-and-error approach to finding the most appropriate treatment for their patient. The decision to employ a particular treatment is based on the type of psoriasis, its location, extent and severity. The patient?s age, sex, quality of life, comorbidities, and attitude toward risks associated with the treatment are also taken into consideration.

      In 2008, the FDA approved three new treatment options[20] available to psoriasis patients: 1) Taclonex Scalp, a new topical ointment for treating scalp psoriasis; 2) the Xtrac Velocity excimer laser system, which emits a high-intensity beam of ultraviolet light, can treat moderate to severe psoriasis; and 3) the biologic drug adalimumab (brand name Humira) was also approved to treat moderate to severe psoriasis. Adalimumab had already been approved to treat psoriatic arthritis.

      Talconex ointment may cause psoriasis to rebound signficantly.

      Medications with the least potential for adverse reactions are preferentially employed. If the treatment goal is not achieved then therapies with greater potential toxicity may be used. Medications with significant toxicity are reserved for severe unresponsive psoriasis. This is called the psoriasis treatment ladder.[21] As a first step, medicated ointments or creams, called topical treatments, are applied to the skin. If topical treatment fails to achieve the desired goal then the next step would be to expose the skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This type of treatment is called phototherapy. The third step involves the use of medications which are taken internally by pill or injection. This approach is called systemic treatment.

      Over time, psoriasis can become resistant to a specific therapy. Treatments may be periodically changed to prevent resistance developing (tachyphylaxis) and to reduce the chance of adverse reactions occurring. This is called treatment rotation.

      Types of psoriasis:

      Photograph of an arm covered with plaque psoriasis.

      The symptoms of psoriasis can manifest in a variety of forms. Variants include plaque, pustular, guttate and flexural psoriasis. This section describes each type (with ICD-10 code [6]).[4]

      Plaque psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris) (L40.0) is the most common form of psoriasis. It affects 80 to 90% of people with psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis typically appears as raised areas of inflamed skin covered with silvery white scaly skin. These areas are called plaques.

      Flexural psoriasis (inverse psoriasis) (L40.83-4) appears as smooth inflamed patches of skin. It occurs in skin folds, particularly around the genitals (between the thigh and groin), the armpits, under an overweight stomach (pannus), and under the breasts (inframammary fold). It is aggravated by friction and sweat, and is vulnerable to fungal infections.

      Guttate psoriasis (L40.4) is characterized by numerous small round spots (differential diagnosis - pityriasis rosea - oval shape lesion). These numerous spots of psoriasis appear over large areas of the body, such as the trunk, limbs, and scalp. Guttate psoriasis is associated with streptococcal throat infection.

      Pustular psoriasis (L40.1-3, L40.82) appears as raised bumps that are filled with non-infectious pus (pustules). The skin under and surrounding the pustules is red and tender. Pustular psoriasis can be localised, commonly to the hands and feet (palmoplantar pustulosis), or generalised with widespread patches occurring randomly on any part of the body.
      Psoriasis of a fingernail

      Nail psoriasi

  24. QUESTION:
    Do i have Psoriasis or Eczema?
    I have had this very dry skin on my hands and feet since i was six years old and now my hands have becoming out of control and they get extremely dry and crack and my dermatologist said it was psoriasis but eczema describes my condition better. Is there a big difference in treatment of them because im getting this steroid ointment and i soak my hands twice a day and put it on it controls it but they are still dry and flaky.

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis on the hands and feet is rare but it does happen. I have Psoriasis too but mine is on my scalp and elbows. Psoriasis is an auto-immune disorder and there is no cure, only treatment and control. Flare ups can and will happen throughout our lives. Eczema is caused by bacteria and is simply a matter of topical creams and shampoos. For Psoriasis, steroids are used to control the swelling of inflammation. Salicylic acid helps the flaking skin and coal tar extract in cremes/shampoos slows-reverses the rapid cellular division. And finally, ultraviolet light damages skin cells and so helps in the treatment as well.
      There are four types of Psoriasis so each type is slightly different.

  25. QUESTION:
    Natural cure for Psoriasis?
    Hi All,

    Can anybody suggest me the natural way to deal with Psoriasis. One of my friends is having problem related,and had gone through different treatments, but not got much relief from the problem.
    Please suggest.
    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for psoriasis only treatments that help with the symptoms as long as you keep doing them.

      Psoriasis is an auto immune disease caused by over working genes. So no, there is no natural cure or remedy that will work. She/he needs to see a dermatologist. The doctor will inform your friend about the available treatments. There are a lot, depending on her/his age and the severity for the psoriasis.

      What triggers psoriasis : Fever, cold/flu, climate, other conditions, infections, stress/anxiety, toxins from products we use or food.

      Food to avoid : Red wine, chocolate, red meat, fried potatoes, beer, fast food.
      The healthier the diet, the 'cleaner' we stay.

      A moisturizing cream is necessary, 2 times a day if possible. Tell your friend to get a deep moisturizing cream from the drugstore, with no perfume in it.

      First step/first treatments are the topical creams. Corticosteroids or salicylic acid ones. They always work, but the problem can re appear after a while. If her/his psoriasis is not aggressive though, the skin can stay clear for long after this treatment. It's different on everyone.

      Other than the topical treatments there is also the PUVA phototherapy. She'll be able to do that at a specialized hospital. Ask a dermatologist for that again.

      Next step are the pills. They can clear psoriasis completely. If you stop them you will get the symptoms back.

      If pills don't work, there the biological drugs ( injections ) such as Enbrel, Stelara, Humira etc. They weaken the immune system so psoriasis stays into remission. Completely clear skin, without one single spot.

      Sun exposure in general helps.
      The best natural therapy for psoriasis is sea swimming. But you need to go to the sea every day and stay in the water for more than 1 hour each time. It can clear up the skin and keep is like this for long. It might take time though.

  26. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis?????
    What is the best thing for redness on nose and flakey skin caused by psoriasis????? i have used products like mg-217, dermarest, and cortizone

    • ANSWER:
      Check out www.beewild.com

      Medically Trialled -Steroid Free Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream was the first in our range of therapeutic creams to be developed by Company Director Robert Davidson who used the cream on his own psoriasis with great success before offering it to the public.
      Mr Davidson worked for years to extract and isolate the substances bees produce to keep their hives disease free and he blended these extracts into a cream that appears to both boost the immune system and increase the body?s natural healing abilities.
      The two extracts - Extract A (organic hydrocarbons) and Extract B (proteins) have also been found to contain Coic Acid; which has antifungal properties, Caffeic Acid; demonstrated to be effective against tumours, bacteria and viruses as well as having anti-inflamatory and immunomodulatory properties, and Linoleic Acid; used to treat such conditions as eczema and acne.
      In 1999 in the first controlled medical trials of the Skin Care Cream, the Wellington (New Zealand) School of Medicine concluded that: "Cautious support can be given to the claims of the manufacturer that Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream is effective in the treatment of eczema".The cream has also successfully passed cytotoxicity tests.

      The benefits of using Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream are many:

      * Medically trialled.
      * No known side effects.
      * No toxins.
      * Can be used while taking cortisone and steroids.
      * It?s effective on such a large range of skin and allergic complaints that it can replace most of the expensive creams and lotions in your medicine cabinet.
      * Heals broken inflamed skin and stops the itch that can so often rob you of your quality of life.
      * In use for over 10 years - hundreds of testimonials acknowledging its effectiveness.
      * Natural extracts blended with the gentlest and most natural of pharmaceutical creams.
      * No cortisone or steroids.
      * No prescription needed.
      * Long lasting.
      * 100% money back guarantee.
      * We?re only a phone call away if you have any questions.

      Apis Mellifera Skin Care Cream can be used on a wide range of complaints:

      * Skin complaints such as psoriasis, excema, measles, mumps, chicken pox and shingles.
      * Allergic skin reactions such as acne and insect bites.
      * Skin burns ? use to reduce recovery time and to reduce scaring on chemical burns, radiation burns, liquid burns and sunburn.
      * Virus infections such as shingles, cold sores, herpes simplex and herpes zoster.
      * Allergic respiratory reactions such as asthma, hay fever and sinus (rub the cream over the affected area several times a day and over time these reactions may be reduced.
      * Reduces swelling in bruises and haemorrhoids (piles).
      * Fungal infections such as athlete?s foot and cracked heels.
      * Cuts and broken skin heal faster.
      * Recommended for skin ulcers and used for this purpose by a number of New Zealand retirement and nursing homes.

  27. QUESTION:
    Can vaccines cause psoriasis?
    My husband who is 52 never had psoriasis or does it run in his family history. Two years ago he had 2 vaccines, one was the twinrix vaccine ( protects against hepatitis A and hepatitis B) and the other to protect against shingles. Not even a few weeks later did he start seeing red spots on his legs and was diagnosed with psoriasis.
    Has anyone else had this happen to them? His family doctor says the vaccines have nothing to do with this but after some research I have read that this may be a cause. Not sure if the psoriasis were dormant and taking the vaccines aggravated something in his system....he has tried everything and it's getting worse.
    Anyone else had something similar like this happen to them? Any help???

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease. Vaccines can cause autoimmune disease. If your husband went 50 years without psoriasis, and then 2 weeks after getting 2 vaccines, developed the disease, it is much more likely than not that the vaccines, which can cause autoimmune disease, did cause the autoimmune disease in your husband. (Unless he was also given other drugs or other environmental exposures during that 2 week period, that are also known to cause autoimmune disease).

      If you live in the United States, there is a 3 year statute of limitations to file a claim with the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. There is no time limit for filing a report with VAERS (Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System).

      As for treatment, I would suggest weaning off any steroid drugs or creams, and starting low dose naltrexone.
      http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/index.htm#What_diseases_has_it_been_useful_for It is an FDA approved prescription drug that is made by compounding pharmacies. He should also be taking molecularly distilled fish oil.

      If you would like to read of other cases of psoriasis that people thought were caused by Twinrix or the shingles vaccine, you can read VAERS reports. Go to http://medalerts.org and click on the red "search now." Open section 2, and click on psoriasis as a symptom. In section 3, click on Twinrix and Varicella Zoster. Then click on "Find." There are only 15 reports, but reporting to VAERS is voluntary, and most people don't even know the reporting system exists. So it's been estimated by the U.S. government that VAERS reports represent only a tiny percentage of actual cases.

  28. QUESTION:
    How to help psoriasis?
    My 12 year old son has psoriasis. I realize that there is no cure, but does anyone have a natural remedy that would help? He has switched to aluminum-free deodorant, and has eliminated dairy, red meat, gluten and citrus from his diet. It still seems to be spreading. Any advice would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      psoriasis is curable... but there are chances of recurrence in older age when immunity is low... in a process called skin turnover, skin cells that grow deep in your skin rise to surface. it generally takes a month but in case of psoriasis it happens in days as ur skin cells rises too fast..

      There are several ayurvedic medicines for psoriasis... i know some doctors who give ayurvedic medicines.. u have to follow strict dietary rules when under ayurvedic medication.. homeopathy is also very helpful but works slowly.. alopathic medicines are good but they have side effects..

      Some alopathic medicines are as follows:
      Neotrexate and methiotrexate medicines, they are known for curing rheumatoid arthritics but they also works fine with psoriasis. Please note that they should be taken with Cetrizine tablet as they have side-effect as headache and Folic acid capsules should be taken as the patient can have folic acid deficiency when under medication of such medicines. Diprovate Lotion and Dermovate lotion should be applied externally to control the itch and their spread..

      for ayurvedic cure there are certain medicines for psoriasis.. i suggest u to go to Shir Ramdevbaba for treatment.. his treatment are natural and without sideeffects..

      i wish he gets cured soon... god bless u.. please feel free to contact me on message or email me at modi_mihir@yahoo.com

  29. QUESTION:
    Help with psoriasis? diagnosis and treatment options?
    around last year I started to develop a red patch on both sides of nose, the left side is worse. I didn't know what it was and wanted to see a dermatologist but my parents took a while to get me in there. I was 16 at the time and I'm 17 now btw. around sept/October of this year I finally went to see a dermatologist because my skin would turn bright red during anything, I didn't really notice flaking but the redness was inevitable. my derm said I had psoriasis and prescribed me protopic .1% for it. now from what I've read psoriasis is can flare up from many things like stress and infections. I recall last winter having a pretty bad upper respiratory infection, I was stressed from wrestling and I had gotten a concussion too. but I've noticed lately my "psoriasis" is spreading, instead of the two spots around my nose I have a square like shape of redness from my upper lip to my upper nose. lately ive noticed a few spots on my chin and close to my mouth. I don't really think I have psoriasis, because it really doesn't build up flakes, but I'm no doctor can somebody please tell me what common diseases/infections or whatever are commonly misdiagnosed for psoriasis? and it's never gone into remission, it's just like a rash that's always been there. people say theirs goes away and comes back but mine has just always been there since winter of last year. and I don't have it anywhere else except for the square on my face now bits and parts of chin. and from what I've heard psoriasis isn't very common on the face, mostly feet hands elbows and such, hairline scalp too. but really I just want somebody's opinion on this because it's really really bugging me and Its stolen my peace of mind from me, any comments will be greatly appreciated and thank you for taking the time to read this.

    • ANSWER:
      It's not common to misdiagnose psoriasis nowadays because it's a well known disease. This could happen 20 years ( which is not far ) ago but not now.
      You have a dermatitis and that's for sure and if it's not psoriasis it's eczema.

      If you are not sure though, go and see another dermatologist.

      My psoriasis has been aggressive from the start, meaning the spots never leave but only if treated. In most cases psoriasis is aggressive and only a few people with mild psoriasis can leave it without a treatment and the spots can go away on their own and come back after an illness or infection.

      The first stage of a psoriasis patch/mark/spot is red, irritated skin that looks like like eczema. This skin inflammation is caused from the build up. You can't see the build up but there is underneath.
      As the spot is getting worse white/silvery flakes start to appear on top until the area is covered completely with the flakes. This is the last stage and the worst part.

      Also you need to know that there are different types of psoriasis. Guttate psoriasis for example, where the spots are red, small and not covered with flakes. Plaque psoriasis is also common and you get bigger patches, red and inflamed skin that leads to flakes.
      Erythrodermic psoriasis : Red skin and this type of psoriasis affects mostly the body surface.

      It usually starts as guttate psoriasis and can transform to plaque psoriasis. Mine started the same way. Psoriasis changes by the time and if you have guttatte psoriasis doesn't mean that it's going to be like this for ever. You can also have all the types together, just in different areas of the body.

      What triggers psoriasis : Fever, cold/flu, infections, other conditions, climate, stress/anxiety, medications, toxins from food or other products we use everyday.

      It's in the genes and you can have the symptoms without a cause anyway but it's always good to know what triggers a flair up.
      There is no cure, that is why we say we have our psoriasis into remission when we don't have a flair up, but that does not mean that you have no spots at all.

      It's not easy to stay clean for long.

      Most treatments work as soon as you keep using them. Your doctor did good to prescribe Protopic because it's not a steroid and has no cortisone in, so you can apply it on the face safely. Cortisone causes thinning of the skin and it's not safe to use in on the face, even though lots of dermatologists still prescribe cortisone for face psoriasis or eczema.
      Protopic will work for any dermatitis and it's also appropriate for eczema. So it will help whatever your dermatitis is.
      Just make sure to use a tiny bid. It does not contain cortisone but it contains another strong substance.

      You need to avoid : Red wine, beer, red meat, fried food, chocolate. The healthier the diet and the less the toxins from products the better the chances of staying clean for long.

      The absolute therapy for psoriasis/eczema is sea swimming. So during summer go swimming as much as possible. If you do it everyday for 2-3 weeks you can stay clean for months. Also if you are close to the sea, you can take an empty bottle of water and fill it with the sea salt. You can keep it and still be active for about a week. Just apply it on the face and other affected areas 1-2 times a day.

      Do not stress about it because this is like a vicious circle. You are stressed and you get psoriasis - the patches and spots cause more stress about the disease - this causes a flair up or can keep the spots there for ever. Try don't to think about it in order to break that circle.

      What is psoriasis ( same for eczema ) in simple words : An autoimmune disease, meaning the genes involved in the reproduction of skin cells are over working, causing skin inflammation and later on flakes. In normal people skin cells die and reproduce once every 40 days approximately. If you have psoriasis that happens once every 24/48 hours. So you got the inflamed skin and the flakes ( dead skin cells ) on top.

      Start using Protopic and the spots will clear up completely in a few days or weeks depending the severity. It takes at about a week for mine to disappear if I catch them on an early stage. The longer you have a spot on your body the longer it will need to go away with a treatment. Also the bigger the patch the longer it will take.
      You will clean up completely. Use the cream again if you get new ones in the future and other than that try to forget about it. This is the most difficult part.

      Gluck

  30. QUESTION:
    tattoos and psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis that will not go away. I've been told that any trauma to the skin could cause my psoriasis to flair up in that spot. I go tanning every other day to try and keep it under control, it's supposed to help. Has anyone dealt with this before? Will the constant tanning fade my tattoo if I get color?
    I don't have psoriasis on my shouler blade where I want to put it and it's going to be pretty small but I'll ask an artist before I go through with it.
    What if I covered it up with a bandaid before tanning? And it's already going to be green?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey burntglitter, I'll tell ya a secret....I have psoriasis too. I have it bad enough that I go to the dermatologist once a month for a shot. And I have to use various topical lotions and cremes to help keep it under control. You have been told wrong....damage to the skin WILL NOT cause your psoriasis to flair up in that spot.(Doctors still aren't completely sure what causes flairups but contributing factors are stress, damage to your immune system and even genetics play a role). Dermatologist DO use light therapy to treat psoriasis...but this treatment is usually done in conjunction with various medications .......and only in severe cases. All this aside, my dermatologist is aware of my tattoos and is aware that I plan on getting more. He's not a big tattoo fan, but he has checked the areas I have tattooed, and the ones I plan on getting tattooed, for moles or other signs of skin cancer and he has given me the go ahead. Once you have a tattoo if psoriasis does flair up there and forms plaques.... Its really not a problem (remember ink is in a subcutaneous layer of the skin and plaques are formed by the OUTER layer growing out of control). You just apply the medication....wait a few hours until the plaque softens and then just wash it off in the shower. You tattoo will look as good as new (actually it will look BRIGHTER in that spot until a new layer of skin grows in) I really think you should see a Dermatologist and let him put you on a treatment regiment. Tanning in the sunbed is only going to marginally help your psoriasis...and is playing hell with your skin and your tattoo. In just the last couple of years new medications have been developed that will give you your life back. My outbreaks are now few and far between.....and with medication hopefully it will stay that way.

      I hope this helps you.....good luck
      rider

  31. QUESTION:
    is Psoriasis Genetic?
    My Father has Psoriasis and so did my Grandmother but hers went away? i was wondering if i would get it is it genetic??

    • ANSWER:
      Why is psoriasis genetic? This skin disorder is considered to be genetic because genomewide analyses have found there are nine locations on various chromosomes and they are strongly associated with the occurrence of psoriasis. They are known as psoriasis susceptibility and have been marked from 1 to 9, for example PSORS 1 ? PSORS 9. Within these nine locations are genes. And most of these genes lay on pathways that cause inflammation and certain mutation of these genes are found in psoriasis. This is basically why the answer to is psoriasis genetic is a yes. This is the primary genetic cause of psoriasis.

      When you get answer to the question is psoriasis genetic you will need to understand something quite vividly. That is psoriasis is generally caused by PSORS 1 and it is responsible for almost 50% of heritability. It actually controls the genes that are responsible for the health of your immune system and for the encoding proteins that is found in people who are affected by psoriasis. Chromosome 6 in MHC contains PSORS 1 and it is responsible for controlling the functions of your immune system. About 3 genes in this PSORS 1 have a link with psoriasis vulgaris. This lead to a positive answer to the question is psoriasis genetic.

      When you ask is psoriasis genetic then knowing just about PSORS 1 will not suffice. Genomewide scans have detected several other genes that manifest altered characteristics during psoriasis. Some are characterized by inflamed signal proteins. This in turn affects the well being of the immune system that plays a crucial part in psoriasis. Some of these genes are responsible for some other autoimmune diseases as well. Once you got your answer to the question, is psoriasis genetic you will need to find about its treatment. Knowing the cause and initiating the treatment in time controls the spread of psoriasis.

  32. QUESTION:
    SCALP PSORIASIS.PLEASE HELP ME.?
    I have scalp psoriasis im trying to get it under control but how! and now it is starting to trail to my face and i cant have that happen! this is so embarrasing. i havent worn my real hair for some months now and im getting depressed. please help

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      In my research in your topic, I came across this article from the National Psoriasis Foundation Forum . This is what one sufferer has to say :

      When having tattoo done, any injury to the skin can result in something called the Koebner effect. The Koebner effect, which was named after the doctor who first described the phenomenon, basically means that an injury to a previously healthy patch of skin (say from a cat scratch or a shaving cut) can result in a new patch of psoriasis . It can also mean that an injury to an existing patch of psoriasis can cause that existing psoriasis lesion to get worse. Not every injury results in the Koebner effect and not ever psoriasis patient experiences the Koebner effect. I don't experience it, but it sounds like you do.

      At the same time of research, I also came across a cream product that can help to relief your psoriasis. This is what the product advertised :

      According to the National Psoriasis Foundation , between 150,000 and 260,000 new cases of Psoriasis are diagnosed each year?amounting to more than 5 million Americans - so you are not alone.

      If you have Psoriasis, getting relief for your skin is a top priority. While there is currently no cure, you can still get relief with a new product being advertised which is made with FDA-approved active ingredient . The product from Revitol Skin Care Product is called Dermasis Psoriasis Cream and it works to help control your skin symptoms in a smooth, non-greasy formula that absorbs quickly?and will not stain your clothes or skin.

      The product unique formulation of ingredients not only soothes and moisturizes your skin, but its active ingredient also helps control the scaling and flaking associated with Psoriasis to help your skin to heal naturally.

      Hope this info will help you decide on getting the tattoo done as wel as help you to get some medicine to relief your icth, redness and scaling.

      Click on link to get more information on Dermasis Psoriasis Cream

  33. QUESTION:
    laser treatment for psoriasis???
    hi i have mild psoriasis all around my hairline and scalp...im seeking treatment and might go for laser treatment too...i 'really' want to know whether r skin gets back to normal and smooth after laser treatment.
    from experience i know that after using ointments and all it gets perfect but if i discontinue using the medicines it comes bck:(
    i want to know if same is the case with laser treatment...please check around from your references and help me:)

    • ANSWER:
      PSORIASIS IS A INCURABLE CHRONIC CONDITION, WHICH IS THOUGHT TO BE AN IMMUNE SYSTEM MALFUNCTION. A LASER WILL DO NOTHING FOR PSORIASIS. HERE IS THE LINK TO THE NPF http://www.psoriasis.org/home/ PSORIASIS IS A CHRONIC, UNPREDICTABLE CONDITION. THERE ARE TOPICAL (APPLIED TO SKIN) TREATMENTS, AND SYSTEMIC (A PILL OR SHOT IS GIVEN) TREATMENTS. I WOULD ADVISE YOU TO TRY ALL THE TOPICAL STUFF FIRST, THOUGH IT WILL PROBABLY BE HIT AND MISS...THE PROBLEM WITH THE PILLS, IS THAT THEY HAVE SERIOUS SIDE EFFECTS. GOOD LUCK

  34. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for psoriasis?
    I have it on my fingers and the skin breaks up and bleeds. It has been diagnosed by a consultant as a hybrid type of psoriasis. Need help!

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is treatable with topical steriods, but they only suppress the symptoms, they don't treat the cause. Stress is a major cause of psoriasis outbreaks and anything you can do to reduce stress in your life can help reduce the symptoms.

      I use an essential oil mix to treat my psoriasis: lavender, bergamot and neroli in jojoba oil. It isn't a cure, but helps keep it under control without using steroids. All three oils are useful in reducing stress and treating skin conditions.

      Diet can also affect psoriasis. Alcohol, caffeine, sugar and other stimulants can make it worse. Reducing the use of stimulants, doing a colon detox and eating organic foods can help.

  35. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis....?
    Does anyone know how to tame psoriasis........ is there anything to help cure it or at least nix some of the problems? I know there is speacial shampoos with coal tar and sylacilic acid, but is there anything else I can try?
    I have this problem on my scalp. It's not a problem anywhere else.
    I have psoriasis on my scalp, it's not a problem anywhere else. It causes a heavy and embarrassing flaking.

    • ANSWER:
      While there is no true cure for psoriasis yet, there are many over-the-counter and prescription products that help to treat the symptoms, such as flaking and itching. I have had psoriasis on my scalp for about 3 years, and tried everything over-the-counter (tar shampoos, dandruff shampoos, creams, etc) and nothing worked. Finally, I was prescribed a shampoo called Ketoconazole, and it worked! Best of all, it doesn't stink like the tar shampoos. Ask your dermatologist about it, it's been such a blessing! Also, there's great information on this website:

      http://www.psoriasite.com

      It has all kinds of information, from risk factors to types of psoriasis to things that you can do to try to minimize the effects. It helps you understand what you can do to try to minimize your symptoms. Hopefully this helps, and I hope you get the relief that you need soon!

  36. QUESTION:
    How to cover up Psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis on my arms (not terrible). I have cover up to cover it, but after ten minutes, it dries up and you can see the psoriasis again. Im a guy so im not good with makeup. How can i cover psoriasis with it? Alternatively, are there any other techincs?

    • ANSWER:
      From WebMD:

      1. "Cosmetic products. While standard lotions and makeup may not help, some cosmetic products are designed to help people with skin problems. For instance, certain creams have green dyes that neutralize the redness on the skin. Many people with psoriasis use the brand DermaBlend. Ask your doctor for recommendations."

      2. "Self-tanning lotions. While they once made people more orange than tan, today's self-tanning lotions look more realistic. They can also work as psoriasis camouflage, some experts say. Keep in mind that tanning lotions don't provide any actual protection against the sun's rays. Considering that many people with psoriasis spend a lot of time in the sun as treatment, you need to be careful about getting excess exposure."

      "Be careful where you use it. Don't use any cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis on open sores, or raw or bleeding skin. If you have pustular or erythrodermic psoriasis, ask your doctor before using any cosmetics. Cover-up may not work and could just make your psoriasis worsen."

      "Watch out for skin irritation. It should be common sense, but if cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis seems to aggravate your skin, stop using it."

      "Know the limits. Psoriasis camouflage doesn't work for everyone. If your psoriasis is under good control and all you have is some redness -- or brown spots -- cosmetic cover-up for psoriasis may help. But if there are raised patches or the skin is scaly, no cover-up will really work very well."

      My mom has used Dermablend and says it works great. It was originally made for scars. It is sold at most department stores like Macy's.

      Hope this helps!

  37. QUESTION:
    does masturbating aggravate psoriasis ?
    A person who is having psoriasis , if he / she masturbates will it aggrivate psoriasis or can mastrubating be a cause for psoriasis

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis is a an auto-immune disease that usually manifests itself as scaling, in frequently rubbed areas of the body (i.e. elbow, knees, scalp, ankles, etc.) Normally the skin regenerates in 28days, but in psoriatic patients, new skin is produced in a fraction of the normal cycle (just a few days). This explains the thickening and scaling of the skin.

      Though Psoriasis is currently thought to be auto-immune in origin, its exact cause (antigen) is still unknown, which explains the lack of a definitive cure and the existence of several symptomatic treatment modalities.

      Any emotional stimulus may aggrevate psoriasis. Plus the friction that masturbation entails MAY aggrevate psoriasis in the areas that is subjected to frequent rubbing.

  38. QUESTION:
    Does psoriasis lead to psychological issues?
    My husband suffers from psoriasis on the higher end. He maintains very low hygiene and expects me to cope with everything. He has also been verbally and emotionally abusive. Is psorisis the root cause behind this? How can I deal with it? I am currently separated.
    He has psoriasis since 10 years. We married a year ago.

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis does not lead to psychological issues. His poor hygiene may be a result of depression from the poor self esteem he feels about his looks because of the psoriasis. Also causing him to be abusive, or he may have just grew up in an abusive family and feels that's how men act. Or just the stress he has been under from the psoriasis. There are treatments for cases of moderate to severe psoriasis that work very well. If you have insurance and don't feel too threatened by him to mention this. Also poor hygiene can cause a flair in psoriasis.
      I would first tell him you don't like the way he treats you and won't remain with someone who is abusive and a threat to you and your children or possible future children before getting involved any further in an abusive relationship which will ultimately destroy your self esteem and cause you to live in fear and possibly result in severe harm or death.
      Choose your words wisely with a short fused man. But, stand your ground. His psoriasis seems secondary to his abuse. Maybe get help for both. Good luck

  39. QUESTION:
    Can Pilot have Psoriasis?
    My passion is to become a Commercial Pilot. I have the required height and weight, eye sight and every thing is fine to proceed for the test. But I am Psoriasis infected. Its been nearly 4 years it started. I have 4 patches on my foot and 1 patch in my fore finger. There is no permanent cure for it, but i am taking medication to supress it, to avoid iritation and making it dry( Oinment and a tablet). My question is "Is it a No for a Pilot?"

    Thanks.
    I know i will be clarified of this doubt if i take medical test for pilot.. But i wanted to make sure before i take it. So i can take it easily if rejected during test..
    Dont do advertisements here please. I know nothing works. I just need an answer for my question
    hmm i searched for the symptoms.. it matches mine.. but i have good sleep at night and my ear is fine.. But my mom have said i have been scratching the patches during my sleep. But 2 of the doctors said it is psoriasis.. patches are 3 to 4cm long with dry scaly skin.
    Yes, I had Athlete foot recently.. Now i am not sure which disease i have.. 3 as of now.. this gives me more stress.. I want to know whether i will pass my medical test or is it a problem to have Psoriasis or dyshidrosis or scabies? Please let me know this..

    • ANSWER:
      Due to Psoriasis you will not be selected for Pilot.Psoriasis is caused due to over reacting of body immune system. So to balance the body immune system Please drink green AMLA JUICE which is available at Patanjalee Yog Peeth outlets of BaBa Ram dev Ji @ 1lt pack Rs.90 only. 30 ml juice by adding 30 ml water be taken after both the meal for 1-2 month regularly. Please do not use shampoo or bathing soap to come in contact to the area effected with Psoriasis, You may Use gram flour having 1 tea spoon turmeric powder & 10 ml Sesame oil & little water in it to make it pasty now apply paste one by one to your body parts & rub gently till removal of the paste then take bath with water only.Apply ALOEVERA Pulp over the effected area & massage gently for 5 minutes twice daily.Shampoo & soap contains some caustic soda in them which enhance the problem.
      Have 100 ml Glycerin & add 35 ml Lemon juice to it shake well & store. Now apply this to the surface effected after bathing & at Bed time daily till cure.
      Purchase Homoeopathic medicine GREYPHITES------200 potency seal pack 30 ml. 1 drop of this medicine in half cup water be taken twice daily till cure.
      Curd /Lemon / Papaya / Guava / Green leafy vegetables /Apples be added to your daily diet.
      If Psoriasis effected your scalp please use Fuller's Earth ( Multani Mitti ) to wash your hair.
      If you observe my suggestions regularly for 3 month you will get rid of psoriasis.After 15 days you will feel some better, but continue the process till cure. If Psoriasis is of old nature it may be cured more than 3 month.

  40. QUESTION:
    Ringworm or Psoriasis?
    so today when i was changing clothes i noticed a small (about a penny sized) red, dry patch! i was freaking out a little cause i saw the kardashians(dont judge haha) and how kim got psoriasis! but its only one patch that i see, it hasnt grown, i havent itched it and i dont have an urge to itch it. When i asked my mom if anyone in the family has/had it she said no. so do i have wrongworm or psoriasis or am i freaking out over nothing?
    and what should i do?
    please and thank you!
    oh and it is a little bit below my arm pit =P

    • ANSWER:
      Ringworm is a fungal infection on the skin.
      If it's ringworm, you'll have a circular rash, but with a whitish center. To get rid of ringworm, you need to use a topical anti-fungal cream such as Clobetasol. Use the cream twice daily, on the spot, for up to 7 to 10 days. After each application, wash your hands thoroughly! Try not to touch or scratch the spot, but if you do, wash your hands!

      Psoriasis is a common and chronic skin disease.
      A person with psoriasis generally has patches of raised red skin with thick silvery scales. The affected skin may be red and scaly or have pustules, depending on the type of psoriasis the individual has.
      There currently is no cure for psoriasis. Living with psoriasis is about educating yourself, learning & understanding your own personal triggers, and adjusting your lifestyle accordingly.

      For an accurate, professional diagnosis, you should see your doctor or consult with a certified dermatologist.


is psoriasis

Scalp Sores

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Would shaving hair off make your scalp sore if you are having chemotherapy?
    My grandma has cancer and she's asked my mum to shave her hair off.
    Her scalp is already very sore, and my mum is worried about making it worse if she uses clippers.
    Has anyone had any experiences like this?
    Thanks for the help

    • ANSWER:
      Her scalp is sore because her hair is about to start falling out, if it hasn't already started. The longer the hair, the more uncomfortable this sensation is.

      I shaved my head when my hair started falling out, having already cut it short before chemo started.

      Many people do this; not only is it more comfortable, many people find it more dignified than having patches of hair and bald patches. Also, it saves a lot of mess. When your hair falls out it gets everywhere - on your furniture, on your clothing, in your food (and other people's), on your carpets, in your bed; you don't realise how much hair you have until it starts to fall out.

      If using clippers hurts your grandma's scalp, your mum can stop; at the moment her scalp is sore because she has hair. An alternative is to cut it as short and as close to her scalp as she possibly can.

      Someone has mentioned the cold cap; it is in any case too late for your grandma to start using this as she's already started chemo, but presumably either she declined it or it wasn't offered by her hospital.

      It isn't a very satisfactory option; I decided against using one, and was glad I had when I saw a woman crying with the pain and discomfort of the cold cap she was wearing.

      Using a cold cap adds a great deal of time to your chemo session - you have to wear it for a while both before and after receiving chemo. And, as I've said, it's uncomfortable and even painful.

      Which might all be worth it if it kept your hair the same as it was, but it usually doesn't. Most people I've known who've used it have lost some of their hair - up to half in some cases. And hair that remained was usually in such poor condition that they cut their hair really short anyway.

      I also know people who used them for their first chemo session but couldn't face them again for subsequent sessions.

      There's also some concern about cold caps shutting down blood flow to the scalp, which is what they do. If you had a cancer cells in the scalp area, they could be protected from the effects of the chemotherapy. Because of this, some oncologists don't encourage cold caps, and I understand they're not widely used in the US for this reason.

  2. QUESTION:
    Why does hair grease make my scalp sore?
    im black so i have to keep my scalp greased..what can i do about this...

    • ANSWER:
      It could mean that you're allergic to the mineral oil that commonly used in grease. Mineral oil is fibrogenic and Induces tissue injury and fibrosis (scarring). Always, ALWAYS do a patch test on all your products before your use them. Your shampoo, conditioner, leave-ins and everything else.

      Contrary to popular belief while mineral oil isn't the best oil mineral does seal in moisture longer than natural oils if you know how to use them. The downside is mineral oil does not nourish the hair and scalp but natural oils do. and no, mineral oil doesn't stop hair from growing, unless your hair is traumatized from pulling or was physically hit, it's going to grow not matter what.

      Coconut oil is the next best thing because it nourishes AND moisturizes. Wheat germ oil, sunflower oil, and eucalyptus extract also known as essential fatty acids/lipids are the next best thing for hair and scalp. Jojoba oil, aloe vera, castor oil, almond oil are also very good for hair and scalp.

      So there you have you have it. Your probably allergic. Mineral oil when tested on rabbits where primary skin irritants.Throw that grease away and pick up some hot oil spray. I personally like these oil sprays because they have all the ingredients above and more.

      I'd also see a dermatologist for an official diagnosis.

      Hoped that helped! ?

  3. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp always sore and has dandruff?
    Why is my hair & scalp always dry, itchy and sore when I take care of it?
    I wash, condition and oil my hair. But everyday my hair is dry and my scalp is sore and has dandruff. I use tea tree oil, carrot oil, morrocan oil, I don't think I use to much, I don't know why my scalp is like this. Should I put oil in my hair everyday or something?

    I don't wash and condition my hair everyday
    I have dry scalp and dandruff

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have dry scalp or dandruff or both?

      Dry scalp would be those big white flakes.(lots of reasons why a scalp could be dry)

      Dandruff would be when you scratch your scalp and you get that waxy build up in your nails. (fungus problem)

      You need to buy shampoo & conditioner appropriate to your condition. If you live in the new york area you could get a scalp exfoliation from a japanese hair place for (westerners havent caught up to that yet)

      Koreans in Korea say you should get that done once a year.

      But make it a habit of not touch your head or hair, the oil from your hands are bad. Of course it doesn't hurt to see a dermatologist BUT make sure he or she specializes in that area and has experience otherwise you'll waste your money

  4. QUESTION:
    I have scalp sores, but can i still dye my hair?
    i have a weird disprder called dermatillomania, where i pick at dry spots on my scalp, than its an open sore that scabs over and i pick at it again.The cycle continues.it sounds gross i know and it is quite embaressing but it's one of those OCD things like biting your nails.

    well obviously it would hurt really bad to dye my hair with open sores but what if i give them 3-7 days to heal up? Than could i dye it?right now i've picked at them today so they're open sores...not scabbed over yet.not picking for several days will take lots of self control.

    • ANSWER:
      If you have sores or itching on your scalp go to a salon and tell them what you want and tell them the problems you're having with your scalp. They will be able to help you and do your hair, and also know what color to use with the right amount of chemicals that wont hurt you as bad.

      Even if you let your sores heal you should still let a pro do your hair, because you don't have a common scalp and you can really damage your scalp by putting chemicals that do seep in to your skin.

  5. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp sore?
    I wear my hair up alot, and every couple of weeks my scalp is sore and really achy feeling. I've searched the internet and I haven't come up with anything useful.

    • ANSWER:
      I totally know what you're going through! I used to have the same problem. I just started to wear my hair down and I don't have the sore scalp issue anymore. So, maybe you can leave your hair down and do like a loose braid or something. Good luck and I hope your scalp goes back to normal soon!!

  6. QUESTION:
    Scalp Sores?!?
    I have a really itchy scalp, but I don't know why. I wash my hair normally, and I have 2 sores on my scalp. What could cause it, and what could be a solution?

    • ANSWER:
      I had these same sores. I went to the dermtologist I forgot what he called them but, he gave me some real expensive moouse to put on them. I realized that the medicine scalpacin that you get at walmart worked just as well. The rx was Luxiq (betamethasone valerate foam 0.12%) But, I would try the scalpacin first. Hope it helps.

  7. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp SO sore?
    Hi.

    I've had a very sore skull for years. Sometimes its just on the crown of my head but at the moment its all over. It feels very very tender..

    Does anyone know what this might be/what causes it?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hey hun...
      Do you have long hair & wear it in a bobble/scrunchie?
      That can cause scalp tenderness with wearing the hair up tight...or wearing a hat...

      Tension headaches and migraines can also make the scalp sore...

      As can severe sunburn or excessive skin exposure to the sun...

      x x x

  8. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp sore and itchy, while my hair is thinning?
    I'm only 20 years old, my hair is in layers and I do not style it with heat/chemicals. I wanted to know if anyone has had similar experiences. My scalp is often sore near the crown of my head and my hair has been thinning on the top layer, it is noticeably drier and unhealthy . What could be the problem? Are these two problems connected?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey...Im 20 too and although I havent had the problem of my scalp being sore my hair did thin a lot and started falling out more. I started using garlic oil and it helped so much with hair loss!

      Try put it on 3 times a week (try sleep with it if you can). It also helps if you heat is slightly but not too hot! Give it a good massage on your scalp...You won't see a difference straight away but after a few weeks I noticed my hair wouldn't fall out as much (Especially in the shower and when I brushed it)

      I hope that kinda helps you!
      xx

  9. QUESTION:
    Pain in the scalp, kind of like sore is it normal?
    My scalp sore when i massage it with my fingertips even if i do it gently, its like even the roots of my hair are sore when i comb it in the opossite way to their natural growth, i've had this issue since i was little, and my mom styled my hair in a pony tail or pig tails or any hairdo that required to hold it tight, i want to know if there is somebody else with this kind of pain and if you know if its normal or there is a problem, because every time i tell sombdy about this, they look at me like scared or give me a funny look like if im crazy, i hope somebody can help. thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      My scalp became so tender, I didn?t want to comb/brush my hair. It felt as if I could feel each individual root pulling. It was so bad that if someone touched the top of my head, my scalp hurt. When I was a teenager, the dermatologist said it was subhorrea in my scalp and prescribed shampoo. But, over the past year I?ve noticed this awful feeling in my scalp and the last few months it had become unbearable. Since I couldn?t find the cause or name of this problem while researching, I felt helpless. Then I started using olive oil for my skin. I read it was good for the hair for hair growth?. When I washed my hair, I put olive oil in my hand and rubbed it on my hair. When I conditioned it, I had some olive oil conditioner and added it to that as well. I put a plastic cap on and let it sit for 10 minutes (per instructions on the conditioner). I also added jojobo because I read it does wonders for the hair. To my surprise, that horrible painful feeling in my scalp was gone after 1 washing. I could run the comb or brush through my hair with ease. I was so happy, because I didn?t know what to do, nor did I know that this would work for it. My understanding is jojoba restores PH balance. Olive oil grows and thickens the hair. Now when I wash my hair, I always use olive oil, sometimes I?ll still use jojoba, but I make sure I have olive oil and in between washings, I put olive oil on my scalp. I used the kind you get from the drug store that is sometimes called Sweet Oil. The last time I washed my hair, I used cold pressed extra virgin olive oil. If you plan to use olive oil on your hair or skin, make sure that it is ?cold pressed extra virgin olive oil?. The other types of olive oil can?t be used on the skin because it will clog your pores. (I used Bragg?s brand). Or, you can use the ?sweet oil? which is olive oil.

  10. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp from steam straightener?
    The other night, my friend was straightening my hair, and she decided to use steam. She got too close and the steam really got my scalp. It's kinda sore, reddish, and has a thin layer of yellowish scab-like stuff. It doesn't hurt too much, but I can definitely feel it when I brush my hair. Is there anything I can do to help it heal faster? *Natural methods preferred, if possible*
    Thanks (:

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you burned your scalp. Something that I've done when I've accidentally burned my scalp a bit in the past is used that kind of aloe gel with pain relief that you can put on sunburn. I wouldn't use it on any open sores, but it does help with the tenderness.

  11. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp?
    I have no idea what this could be even been to the doctor and they say they don't see anything wrong. But about some over a year ago my scalp started getting very very sore right on the back of my head. Painfull when brushing, washing or just about anything even just gliding my fingers thrue the ends of my hair results in pain. My hair is also breaking of very badly in that same area where I have the pain it is very much shorter than the rest of my hair. Please help what can I do? Now I do know I have dry scalp tryed dandruft shampoo already but no improvement on the pain. I am afraid this could be a more serious probleme.

    • ANSWER:
      I checked this site and they said...

      Answer

      It seems likely that you have a condition affecting the skin in that area and a doctor really needs to look at your scalp. It is easy to miss signs of inflammation in the skin when you're not used to looking for it.

      As your symptoms are mostly confined to the scalp, it seems likely that you have a form of dermatitis or eczema known as seborrhoeic dermatitis. This does usually cause scaling, but in mild forms the scaling can be difficult to spot. It is a skin condition that can be treated relatively easily with shampoos and creams.

      Alternatively, your skin might be reacting to a chemical. It is possible to become sensitive, even allergic, to substances that you've used for a long time. Look carefully at the shampoos and conditioners that you are already using on your hair.

      It is hard to give an accurate diagnosis without seeing your scalp. It is best to go to your doctor to discover what is causing these symptoms.

      Yours sincerely

      The Medical Team
      Site: http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ate/skinandhair/204219.html

      Also these sites gives info on sore scalps symptoms etc...

      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/scalp_symptoms.htm

      http://searchwarp.com/swa239150.htm

      Best of luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    sore itchy scalp with little wounds? help?
    For the past week, my normally healthy and thick scalp has been sore, getting overly oily, and with small bumps that are red in the center with a bit of blood.
    I shampoo every day. I keep clean and have not changed hair products recently. Someone checked my scalp and did not see any bugs or anything. I have the wounds scattered over my scalp but there are more on the sides of my head than other parts. The itch gets a bit worse at night, but I can't tell if it's because I am thinking about it or due to something else.

    Please Help!! It's starting to drive me crazy
    Thank you Emily and Dawn;

    the shampoo I have been using for a long time is Aubrey's Natural Camomile shampoo (free of SLS or other weird stuff)

    and no I haven't been to any countries in over 11 years

    • ANSWER:
      Your scalp may be irritated by your shampoo. Even though you haven't changed products, it takes time to build up an allergy or irritation. Try showering every other day, or shampooing every other day. It may be your brush as well. Make sure you change it every few months because the tips of the bristles break off and cut your scalp.

      Try changing your hair products. Go for an organic or "sensitive skin" shampoo and conditioner. I like Jason Organic shampoo. Make sure you rinse your hair really well when you are in the shower, and try not to use very hot water. This is very drying and bad for your skin and hair.

      It may be your detergent as well. Try changing your pillow case and see if that helps.

      Hope it feels better soon!

  13. QUESTION:
    Scalp feels sore after Keratin hair relaxing treatment?
    I have naturally very thick, wavy hair and I was fed up with ironing it every other day on full heat for half an hour or more so I bought this product called str8 forward.

    My hair has come out straight but a small area on my scalp is burning a bit after using the treatment.

    The ends of my hair were in bad condition before and I had to trim them also because after I used it they all became like weak elastic and began breaking off.

    What should I do?
    It states that I cannot wet my hair for 3 days after.
    I did it at home. Salons, I am waaay too out of pocket for those at the moment.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you didn't thoroughly remove all of the chemicals during part of the process, or that area of you scalp had broken skin from scratching or your scalp is just extra sensitive in that area.

      Try putting a bit of Vitamin E oil on your scalp or get a small bottle of oil spray/sheen for hair and spray the problem area.

      I know you were tired of ironing your thick, wavy hair every morning but if you want to keep your hair, you need to leave the chemical processes to the professionals or alone all together!

      In any event, if it continues to burn, you need to seek the help of a dermatologist.

  14. QUESTION:
    Bleach directly on scalp?
    I went to the salon and they botched my dye job. They put bleach directly on my scalp and hair. I now have sores on my head and it is very sore and my lymph nodes are swollen and hot on the back of my neck and head, It has been over a week and it is getting worse and I am running a fever and feel all fuzzy headed and dizzy. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      there are a slew of types of scalp far cry from each other and there is a need for doing a test before bleaching or it will be tempting fate to bleach on scalp with an omission of the test.
      if at this point in time it isn't yet egregious,you can make up for it in few steps:
      1.pouring full cream milk on hair can scotch the snake while milk contain lactic acid that can counteract the pain.
      2.keep your scalp clean.
      3.to restore dehydrated hair,you should moisture it with hair mask and shower cap worn for 30 mins.
      thereafter,your scalp would pull through own its own.don't gild the lily by touching the wound while it would let it go out of firing pan and into the fire.lastly,if the situation get out of hand,you will need a doctor or dermatolodist that will be the only person fitting your bill.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can a persons scalp get sore.?
    My scalp is sore and my gf does not believe me.

    • ANSWER:
      yes it can get sore
      its sore because it is very dryy
      u need to moisturize it.. easiest way is to oil

  16. QUESTION:
    My scalp is sore and very sensitive to the touch..?
    Recently I lost a lot of weight and I had problems with hair loss. I started taking more vitamins and doing what the pharmacy told me to use and take to help. I still have a sore scalp and I wonder what else it could be besides my diet. What could be causing my scalp to be so sensitive. It isn't itchy, but seems sore to the touch and I am still losing hair too fast. Any other advice before I go see the doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      Fizzy, cancer doesn't cause you to lose your hair! The medication you take when you have cancer causes that, not the cancer itself.

      I would see the doctor because it could be ringworm which is a fungal issue just like athletes foot but on the scalp and it causes the hair to fall out. It could also just be eczema but not sure that would cause hair loss. I would surely call the doctor it could be something to do with the vitamins you are taking.

  17. QUESTION:
    sore scalp?? i think im dying :|?
    my scalp is really itchy, sore and flakes. i dunno if its dandruff or just build up or something else
    i wash my hair everyday but dont shampoo everyday, only condition and i dont apply that to my scalp only hair (yeah weird, but anyway)
    its thin. very curly, about shoulder length, extremly dry (so i use almond oil)
    i used to have thick hair but i swear im going bald. and im only 16
    i lose sooo much hair and my pony tail is soo much thinner. i told the hairdresser she said its normal and you lose 100 hairs a day but i lose so much more and i think im getting a bald patch :|
    i don't straighten it alot. only if im going out for a very special occasion so like i dunno, say once a month
    i use nioxin system 5, doesnt seem to be working though
    i use another conditioner - herbal essence (rose hips and jojoba )
    i don't dye my hair, its natural
    and my scalp like some places when i touch it, if feels bruised i don't know why though.
    PLEASE HELP

    • ANSWER:
      I. Go see a dermatologist immedeately to get a diagnosis if there is one to be given.

      II. Do NOT Wash your hair everyday. Once a week tops. Washing your hair too frequently can strip it of its natural essential oils that play a large part in keeping your hair and scalp healthy.

      III. Condition your hair and scalp everytime you wash it. Beacuse shampooing your hair cleanses the entire folicle ridding it of residue, dirt, build up, and the natural essential oils your scalp produces, it dries your hair out. Therefore, conditioning your hair after shampooing it is vital. Don't skip it.

      IV. Hot oil treatments and deep conditions are great for keep your hair in well conditioned shape. its best to go to a professional to get this done. Leave-In conditioner is good for at home daily use. Try 911 Extra dry formula. If your hair is natural, which i strongly suggest for best results, try natural products. Shea Butter (all natural) is a wonderful natural conditioner.

      V. Take heed to this advice!!!!! (if you like having hair.)

  18. QUESTION:
    dry scalp sores that are somewhat painful when touched what are they?
    will olive oil conditioning shampoo work?

    • ANSWER:
      i have something along that line. my scalp is dry and i have seboria (spelling). I went to my dermatologist and he gave me some oil to use at night then the next morning wash it out with the special shampoo. But that didn't really help so my stylist gave me some special scalp shampoo and conditioner its by Aveda (its the dillard's salon stuff). And this spray to put in and it works really well.

  19. QUESTION:
    EMERGENCY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!PLEASE HELP!!!! I have questions about Weird scalp sores??
    EMERGENCY I have questions about Weird scalp sores?
    my background:
    im in my early teens
    i used to have eczema
    i shower every day
    my hair gets really greasy

    my symptoms:
    I will touch my head and feel tender bumps
    I start to pick at them, sometimes they feel wet
    they are very sore!
    when i wash my hair, it hurts to have hot water on my head
    when touch my head I start to pick around the sores and little "crusts" will come onto my finger, they look yellowish and sometimes a burgundy-red

    what do you think this is? how do I fix it?

    Please, help me! I am up really early right now because im in so much pain. PLEASE HELP ME!

    • ANSWER:
      You probably have a mild case of folliculits, for which you'll need some antibiotics. Your doctor can examine you to see if I"m correct (you didn't include a picture of the sores for me to look at), and then prescribe the correct medication.

  20. QUESTION:
    is your scalp sore when your hairdressers cut your hair?
    I am so tenderheaded and she told me it was 90% in my head and 10 percent on my scalp . my head is tender and it has been sore for a couple of days after her cutting it. i love the cut but cant stand her pulling it.

    • ANSWER:
      after she cuts it, not really, but it hurts ALOT when she takes the brush and rips it against my scalp. oh, and idk why, but she blasts her blowdryer on the highest setting, and it burned my scalp sooo bad, i almost cried (but i tried not to lol)

  21. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp sore and itchy?
    my scalp has been sore and itchy all over and i keep my hair clean since its been likw this the only time it feels better is when i take a shower and wash it but afterwards not too long it will start feeling itchy and sore again i use tresemme and i have african american hair so i use olive oil lotion, pink hairspray, and hot oil treatments once in a while its not dandruff i dont have any flakes or anything but its just driving me crazy and i want it to stop and feel better so please any ideas on what this could be and how to help it.

    • ANSWER:
      you basically have a dry scalp
      dont wash your hair more than 3 times a week
      use hair oil on scalp
      hope i helped
      xxx
      good luck

  22. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp, hair shed and thinning hair - what could be wrong?
    I am a 25-year old male with shoulder length hair. For the last two months I have noticed a mass amount of hair shedding. I was told that it is a seasonal shed caused by winter creeping in - and in fairness my hair shed rate has slowed down over the last few weeks. However, the point on the front of my scalp has become very sore over the last 2-4 weeks and I have noticed a thin patch surrounding (it is noticeable in light) about the size of an Oasis bottle cap (I know it is a bad example). The point is sore sore that I feel if I pull lightly it it will rip out.

    Additionally, about five weeks ago I suffered with a very sore scalp and visited the doctor about my shed and scalp - she saw nothing to cause concern and sent me away. Of course this has happened since.

    One theory that has been put forward was that for the last two years at work I was gelling my hair into a ponytail, thus possibly pulling hair out. The problem with this theory is I started to get pimples on my forehead due to it and so my boss allowed me to start wearing my hair down about three months ago. The thinning has only occurred over the last month.

    Another theory is the fact I colour my hair. I have not coloured my hair since August so I don't think that theory is up to much either. Then someone mentioned that wearing a beanie regularly can cause thinning, though I only wear one when out - IF it is raining, snowing or very windy. Regardless, I have found nothing that backs the beanie claim up.

    Lastly, I got told hair straightening may be the cause, though a hair stylist told me that it cannot cause hair loss but breakage if done regularly. I slowed down on straightening a year ago and only do it after every hair wash (every 2-3 days) - I leave my hair to air dry then straighten, using hair protection and using minimal heat. I don't straighten any more than that.

    Is it possible I could be suffering from male pattern baldness or alopecia? My dad was bald, but I remember his balding stages and it does not relate mine. Alopecia, however, is claimed to be linked to stress, and I had a period of stress not too long ago...

    I honestly don't know what to do. At my age I really do not want to be bald, and I am also upset at the possibility of having to shave my hair - I really don't want to have to do that.

    • ANSWER:
      I read the whole story to find answers, as well. But, I guess I can give my points to answer yours.
      I have thick hair and wanted it to thin up.
      Hair thinning comes with aging because of lack of nutrients and mostly from the sun exposure. The Sun will slowly diminish the outer shielding of each strand, evident in the top layers of hair.

      Sores may be caused by the splitting your hair down the more to the left and right side or middle. the change in hair follicle and tissue positions may cause the soreness.
      Solution: Try flipping your head upside down and back upright to help replace hair to a comfortable position ( also, shaking your head like models do in shampoo commercials)
      You could also, massage scalp to encourage blood flow during shampooing to relief soreness. And find a good day to keep a 2nd-day hair. Don't wash hair everyday, but wash every other day. ( If you have quick-oily hair like me, on a 2nd-day. That is why you must find a 'Off' day so the greasy hair won't be in front of people) But, don't cover the hair either on a 2nd day hair. Girls usually curl it to hide the grease.

      Make sure hair is completely dry before sleeping. Sleeping on moist hair causes headache in the morning and soreness.
      Most importantly, do not touch your scalp to much. And yeah, let the hair down! Free it!

      Genetic balding would come from the maternal side of family. Male baldness are evident in mother's family line; You can confirm it if your mom has a brother or other blood related male. ( not really by one's father).

      If info does not help, there is always hair health advises on most shampoo and conditioners bottles and( other hair product) Go to the shampoo isle of stores and read bottles. Buying is not necessary.

      I hope my advises help. . This is a girl's point of view of hair health, so Good Luck!

  23. QUESTION:
    My scalp gets sore AND itchy?
    For the past couple a month (if not years - not really noticed it) - when I'm walking to school (And only going to school in the mornings, which is unusual) My scalp gets extremely itchy, aswell as my forehead for some weird reason.
    A couple of weeks a go, I also had a lot of dandruff for some weird reason too, so I used vinegar which took it all away, and it hasn't came back since.
    I wash my hair/scalp as frequently as possible.

    When I wash my scalp, it goes red at certain parts, and actually gets sore.

    Any ideas what this is?
    I can assure you, I do not have any 'bugs' or 'lice'
    I've tried several Shampoos - T-Gel and H+S

    • ANSWER:
      washing more is probably not helping. switch to head and shoulders shampoo/conditioner. if that doesn't do it switch to baby shampoo. Cut back on hair washing to every other day, it just makes more oil to fight the drying effect of the shampoo.

      Its likely that you either just have a sensitive scalp or your allergic to something in the shampoo.

  24. QUESTION:
    sore scalp?????????????????????????
    My head sometimes feels really sore and it feels better when i massage it.But why does this happen?My neck and my head will feel sore most of the time and i dont know why this even happens because i dont hit my head or anything ever. anyones opinion will count thanks

    • ANSWER:
      The trapezoid muscles extend from your back, up your neck and onto your scalp. If you have tension in these muscles then your scalp can hurt. This is why massage helps. So you also need massage on your back and neck. This can have something to do with poor posture or hunching your shoulders if you are stressed. We do create tension in these muscles without realising we are doing it unfortunately. A hot pack also helps.

  25. QUESTION:
    Why is my scalp so sore?
    I have Afro-Carribean type hair, and most of the time I wear it in braids with extensions for six months at a time. It is only when I take it out and wash my hair that my scalp becomes extremely sensitive. It mainly hurts whenever I attempt to brush or comb it not matter what type if comp of brush I use, but anything as simple as just putting on hairoil can be extremely painful. It also doesn't matter how long I leave my hair out as over the 8 week summer I leave it out or in canerows and it still hurts to do anything to my hair even at the end of summer, but one it's plaited or tied up my head doesn't hurt at all. why is this??

    sorry it's really long, but please answer anyway.

    • ANSWER:
      Here are a couple of suggestions

      Maybe the cornrow were very tight
      Try applying scalp oil
      Try lose tension hairstyles
      Try combing your hair from different direction from the back

  26. QUESTION:
    My scalp is sore! ;o?
    My scalp is very sore, or "tender" it really does hurt. Does anyone know why?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure why. It could be caused by dry scalp or an overly tight hairstyle.

      Syrinx Za?s Hair and Scalp Combo are formulated to treat and reduce the symptoms of an sore scalp, whatever the reason for it may be.

  27. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp?
    I have no idea what this could be even been to the doctor and they say they don't see anything wrong. But about some over a year ago my scalp started getting very very sore right on the back of my head. Painfull when brushing, washing or just about anything even just gliding my fingers thrue the ends of my hair results in pain. My hair is also breaking of very badly in that same area where I have the pain it is very much shorter than the rest of my hair. Please help what can I do? Now I do know I have dry scalp tryed dandruft shampoo already but no improvement on the pain.

    • ANSWER:
      Hate to tell you thats where you are going to go bald at. You can use selsun blue to cure the dry scalp and dandruff problem.

  28. QUESTION:
    why does my scalp feel sore when brushing my hair lightly?
    i'm 23 i'm not balding i shave my head for the military... but today all day i've noticed when i gently brush my hand accross my hair not even touching my scalp it feels like its really sore somewhat.. in a really weird way... any particular reason for this? could it be a sickness like the flu or cold? i rarly get this feeling but i've noticed it once a year or every other year sometimes multiple times...
    its not dry... and i wash my hair on a daily basis...

    • ANSWER:
      try washing it less. your scalp is clearly irritated. a lot of the time if you wash your hands to many times during the winter your skin cracks, well maybe its the same concept. im not a doctor but i would suggest trying to wash your hair less or change shampoo ad conditioner.

  29. QUESTION:
    why is my scalp so sore?
    i had my hair in a bun for about 6 hours and i took it down and my scalp was really sore. i tried shaking my hair around and brushing it out but it would go away. i washed my hair and it went away automatically. i let it dry and put it up again for about 2 hours and took it down and my scalp became sore again

    • ANSWER:
      i had thre same problem with a certain brand of shampoo i was using, i stopped using it and its ok now so it could be that

  30. QUESTION:
    whats wrong with you if your scalp is sore?
    like only if i touch it, it hurts

    not alot but noticable pain

    • ANSWER:
      maybe your cornrows? i dont know, but I only hear of sore scalps if you have braids in your hair or something. Orv maybe your scalp is jus dry, like if you stay somewhere that's cold. But I dont know, maybe you should ask a doctor if you are not sure

  31. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp after removing braids?
    So I got long braids (cornrows) a month ago for the first time and i decided to remove them and get them done again but last night after I took them out and took a shower my scalp got sore to the touch, I also noticed a lot of hair fell out, I wanna know if its ok to get my hair braided again today even though its kinda sore to the touch, also what could have caused this? I don't think the braids were too tight because they felt fine when I had them. I think it may have been from me scratching A LOT the last week before I removed them. Is it also normal for a lot of hair to fall out? Also I have that native american looking hair (long straight with curly ends)

    • ANSWER:
      I believe your braids were too tight. Some stylist braid fine hair really tight because it?s harder for them to grip the hair. Kinky curly hair is easier for them to braid, and they don?t seem to work as hard by pulling every strand of hair into the braid. Also, whenever you have braids, you?re not combing your hair everyday. You naturally shred hair and if you can tell the difference, you will see something white on the end of the shredded hairs. That?s normal, but if you see no white tips at all, then its breakage. Also the top of my head is sore to when I remove braids. I think that?s natural, because when you?re not gentle it will hurt. I would also like to add that you should go the dermatologist. Have the doctor look at your scalp making sure you don?t have any serious skin and hair problems. For example, Alopecia from the tight braids, in the mean time anything that causes serious pain you should stop. But, I wish I could say that for those 6 inch gold heels I brought. :) I really hope that helped you.

  32. QUESTION:
    Sore scalp?
    Random parts of my scalp will be sore for no reason, i've had this problem for 3 days and it has moved all around my head, the first day it was on the crown, the second on the front and today has moved from the side to the very back. It isn't a bugbite. when i move my hair it hurts. what is this?!?1

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    Scalp problems, knots, sores, extremely itchy and painful?
    every few months my scalp gets really irritated. i get big knots that turn into sores that are very itchy and painful. i discontinued using hair dye a long time ago, have not used any new products on my hair. any idea what could be causing this?

    • ANSWER:
      Since you are describing irritated big tender knots that turn into sores, I would suspect that you are getting a folliculitis problem. A lot of times, this might be due to a bacterial infection with strep or staph. It would be best to show your dermatologist who can diagnose it "for sure" and possibly even get a culture of the sores, to make sure of the germ type and the best antibiotic to put u on.

  34. QUESTION:
    hair stylists advice please- scalp sores?
    I wanna know how hair stylists feel about cutting peoples hair with scalp wounds.
    I have a dermotillomania where I pull out pieces of my skin from my scalp or scratch it until it bleeds. I have to get a haircut soon because all the damage im doing up there is ripping my hair and its all fuzzy and gross. Im embarrassed to go though because I don't want to gross the hairdresser out or have her say something that will make me ashamed. I dunno. I would wait to go but it seems its not getting any better, and my hair is just getting worse. I have to get it done eventually but im so anxious about It I wanna throw up.

    Anyone can offer any Professional insight?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok..I'm not a profesionnal. but I had that problem. My skin is really sensitive. So I changed my shampoo for Dove. And my scalp is no healthy!

  35. QUESTION:
    why scalp/head is sore after wrapping?
    its soo sore! i wrapped my hair not too tight 2 nights ago and my scalp is still sore! like it hurts if someone tries to massage my scalp! why is it? and what can i do to make it stop hurting?
    no i dont perm my hair, i straighten it

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not really sure why it hurts, but my hair does that too. I'm guessing it's that since the hair is turned in an angle all night long that in the morning when we comb it out to be in it's normal position, our scalp is "asleep", in a sense. I think it's just something you get used to, because when i first get my hair done i wrap it at night and notice it, but as i wrap more often I feel it less. Hope this helps!

  36. QUESTION:
    scalp sores due to hair dye, what can i do?
    I dyed my hair a few days ago with born blonde from nice and easy. It made my hair a horrible color and now its sore and I have one sore above my ear in the hair line that is humped up and open and sore but not bleeding. what can I do to calm the pain? how long will it take to heal?

    • ANSWER:
      have had the same thing many a time....it sounds like you left the colour in for too long and it has burnt your scalp...try using tea tree shampoo, or just use a cotton bud to dab some tea tree oil on it....if you don't scratch or pick at it it should heal up within a week, it should stop hurting within a day or so...don't use any permanent hair colours for about 4 weeks or so...if your hair is a bad colour wait at least a week and use a rinse for your hair.(nothing with ammonia in it..)hope this helps

  37. QUESTION:
    Poll : Scratches all down your back or a sore scalp ?

    • ANSWER:
      sore scalp baby, I love the way you pull my hair!

  38. QUESTION:
    Sores on my scalp...HELP!!!?
    Does anybody know what this is? I have what appears to be big zits in my scalp. I have used a bunch of medicated shampoo and soaked in Epson salt nothing is making it go away. Anybody else have this condition? Have any remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      I had that & alopecia at the same time. My scalp was completely destroyed at one time. I had no choice but to see a dermatologist. It turned out to be a fungal infection. I ended up getting steroid injections under my scalp as well as an anti-biotic. I cannot begin to tell you how bad those injections hurt. She mixed Xylocaine with the steroid to numb the pain. But the reality was, it burned so bad at first then for about an hour & a half, I felt nothing until the Xylocaine wore off. Then my head felt worse. But after three months of that I was good to go. There is no home remedy that I can think of. This is one that you have to see the Dr about.

  39. QUESTION:
    Help! Scalp is tender?
    hey im 17.
    as i mentioned awhile ago, i had a very itchy scalp.
    Head and shoulders made the itchyness completely go away.

    now the bottom of my scalp on one side feels sore.
    and it feels a bit tight.
    im scared im going to go bald.

    Has this happened to anyone?

    My ear slightly hurts too, could this be because of my sinus/anxity problems?
    also, ive had my hair tied up alot.

    I'm just scared im balding :/

    • ANSWER:
      Having the scalp sore can be from pulling your hair too tight.
      But I think you should see a dermatologist...
      I know I didn't really help that much but I tried...Good luck though! :)

  40. QUESTION:
    balls from sores scalp?
    whenever i comb thorugh my hair i find these lumps like pimples in my hair and it hurts. i eventually leave it alone in 2 minutes and i leave it for a long time maybe two weeks. but after that time when i go over my hair i feel this small bump in my hair. when i scrath it a ball falls out annd its like a scab but its not.

    • ANSWER:
      This is likely due to dry scalp or not rinsing all the shampoo out of your hair. Try using a sensitive scalp shampoo. Wash every day. You might even try a bath brush or so to clean the scalp of these scabs or residue. Make sure to rinse Thoroughly.
      If things don't get better after a week or so, the try some baby oil after showering.


scalp sores

Best Shampoo For Scalp Psoriasis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Scalp Psoriasis.!.!.?
    I think i have Scalp Psoriasis and Im really getting tired of my hair always being flaky. any help? plz answer back, I really need to know.

    • ANSWER:
      I've had scalp psoriasis for years. My prescriptions no longer work for me, so I've quit them and am treating it with a couple over the counter products. The first is Neutrogena T/Gel shampoo - doesn't smell great but it works! I also use the spray component of the "Skin Zinc" system - another over the counter product that you should be able to find at any major drug store. It has a ointment and a spray, the spray works well for the scalp.

  2. QUESTION:
    Scalp Psoriasis.?
    I'm sure there are so many topics relating to psoriasis, but I can't find any.

    I've had psoriasis for a couple years now, what started as a half dollar size spot on my leg, which was thought to be ringworm at first, is now all over my body.

    The spots all over my body are not bad at all, but i can't get them under control because the cycle just continues once I get them to go away..

    My main concern is my scalp. Whenever I shower, I make sure I have my fine comb, and I rake out all of the skin and the scales, but of course, that causes it to be raw and bleed, and once it hits the water, burn like crazy. I've used endless amounts of cream, and Ultravate works the best, but not enough.

    I can't get my scalp under control and it's absolutely terrible. It's always flaking and always bright red. I bleach my hair just to burn it for a month or so, so it doesnt grow back

    Is there anything I can do to keep it under control without having to shave my head and go through intensive treatment?
    Oh, and my dad used to have it pretty bad, so I know I'm stuck with it.

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been properly diagnosed with psoriasis?

      If you have, does it flare up acutely? Or is this a chronic condition that you're dealing with?

      Generally, with the scalp area, your condition is called "seborrheic dermatitis," which is caused by inflammation of your sebaceous glands and accelerated skin proliferation (sometimes it could also occur due to an yeast-like fungus)...which is why I asked if you were properly diagnosed because there are different treatments depending on the cause.

      Instead of bleaching and raking, which may cause your scalp skin to be even more vulnerable to other infections/inflammation problems, I recommend that you try Head&Shoulders shampoo (for dandruff). Avoid using this on broken skin!!!!! This means you should stop hurting your scalp, wait for the skin to heal, and try the shampoo. There are different concentrations of the active ingredient - pyrithione zinc. If you purchase the lower concentration (0.1-0.25%), leave the shampoo in for a few minutes before you rinse off. If you use the higher concentration up to 2%, you should rince off within minutes of application.

      Another product is Selsun Blue. It contains selenium sulfide. You also want to avoid using this product on broken skin. This product may stain lighter hair colors, so if your hair color is light, make sure to rinse off properly.

      If you decide to try either of the two products (stick to one), you want to use them at least 2-3 times a week, and it may take up to 4-6 weeks before you see any improvements. However, if your symptoms seem to not go away or get worse, stop the product immediately and go see a doctor!

      Besides the products, you want to maintain good hygiene, and you can always use shampoo that you regularly use to cover up any odor from the medicated shampoo (meaning you can shampoo twice).

      There is antifungal treatment option, but you should really talk to a doctor and determine the cause before you consider products other than the two I listed.

      When in doubt, ask your doctor for any further advice. I hope you get better soon!

  3. QUESTION:
    Professional Cosmetologist Question: Best shampoo for scalp psoriasis?
    I have a cosmetology license, but currently do not work in a salon. I have a relative who suffers from scalp psoriasis which causes flaking and dandruff but does not see a doctor for it. I would like to buy some good shampoo for her, but have no idea which brand works the best. She asks me to trim her hair, so I see this condition and would like to help her. She also has psoriasis on her neck. I think she should get a prescription from a doctor but she isn't doing that for some reason. Any professional products in the salon supply stores I could buy for her?

    • ANSWER:
      I AM NOT A PROFESSIONAL COSMETOLOGIST BUT MY 17 YEAR OLD SON HAD PSORIASIS AND A DOCTOR TOLD ME TO USE SOMETHING CALLED-->T-GEL,YOU CAN BUY IT IN DRUG STORES,ITS KIND OF EXSPENSIVE BUT IT TOTALLY GOT RID OF HIS PROBLEM,TRY IT AND LET ME KNOW IF IT WORKS--->GOOD LUCK OH (ITS IN THE SHAMPOO ISLE)=)

  4. QUESTION:
    whats the best shampoo for scalp psoriasis?
    i remember having this since i was about 10, im now 17 :( i never really payed any attention to it, but for the past year ive been putting creams on it and it helps the symptoms until i shower, then it comes back.
    its only on a little bit on my scalp, but i am sick of having to treat it it makes my hair greasy so i am interested in shampoo. not a cheap shampoo either, something really good that i could get online?
    what is the absolute BEST shampoo out there for scalp psoriasis?!!?

    also i have some questions:

    i know its a life time skin disease, so does that mean it will get worse, then maybe go away for a few years? and come back?

    is it possible it will ever ago away, or probably not since ive had it for 7 years?

    i know it happens because your immune system over reacts or something, so wouldnt it help it if you took medicine to help regulate your immune system?

    apple cider vinegar helps?

    what should i stay away from, what should i do to help ?

    i live in the country, i have hard water it has sulfer in it, do you think thats making it worse?

    • ANSWER:
      you need clobetasol shampoo. this is a prescription shampoo. if you have psoriasis over a large part of your body you might consider one of the newer injectable medications for this. humira, embrel are both used for this condition. go to the dermatologist & make a decision. you will have this until you die (genetic component). someone in your family had this & gave you the gene.... it will get better, get worse (in winter months.) injectables are the best treatment but have more risks than a steroid cream.

  5. QUESTION:
    what is the best way to treat psoriasis on the scalp!?
    i need an easy way to treat psoriasis on the scalp with out having too much trouble rinsing the remedy from the hair

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis shampoos are only for maintenance and not for treatment. Most people just use a shampoo and except for the scalp to clear up completely, which will definitely not going to happen.
      That is why so many people can't clear scalp psoriasis, they find it impossible but it's not.

      If you want to clear up your scalp, you should use a proper lotion treatment, preferably with salicylic acid in it. I've tried almost every product available, because I've had psoriasis for so many years and I found that Propiosalic lotion works the best.
      Most lotion for scalp psoriasis are oily and sticky and you can't take them off or even apply on the scalp. So you need to wash your hair again and again to take them off, which actually causes more flakes and dry skin and makes the condition worse.
      Psopiosalic is not oily at all, it's easy to apply and you don't even have to wash it out.
      It's less than . You apply it on the scalp once or twice a day for fast results and in about half an hour in dries out completely. You don't have to wash your hair afterwards, not even the next day. It does not smell when it's dry and it's not noticeable.
      It can clear even severe scalp psoriasis in a few days if applied daily. Causes no irritation. I am sure you can find lots of lotion like this one, so ask your pharmacist or dermatologist.

      After the scalp is clean completely, you can keep using a psoriasis shampoo if you want to keep it clean for long. I don't because it's not necessary. My scalp stays clean for long and I only need to use the lotion once in a while, even though my psoriasis is aggressive.
      Best shampoos to use are the tar ones. They help a lot and they are not harsh for the scalp. Any harsh shampoo like head and shoulders will change the ph of the scalp and will stop working after a while. The worse thing tough is that no other treatment of shampoo will work afterwards, so it's better to stay away from those.

      Gluck

  6. QUESTION:
    treatments for scalp psoriasis?
    i have had psoriasis now for about 3ish years and i've tried everything from topical creams and sprays to the tgel shampoo. they are all just temporary fixes and seem to stop working after a month or so. is there anything that is proven to get permanently rid of symptoms or anything that anyone has tried that has worked?

    • ANSWER:
      I've had scalp psoriasis for a number of years. Currently I'm using Neutrogena T/Gel and the spray component of the "Skin Zinc" system on my scalp. Skin Zinc has a ointment that I use on my exposed skin and a spray that I use on my scalp. I was on prescriptions for a number of years, I quit them when I stopped responding after a number of years on them. The one my dermatologist prescribed for my scalp which worked quite well for about 10 years was called Fluocinonide. It's a very strong prescription medication that comes in a liquid form so it can be easily squirted onto the affected skin.

  7. QUESTION:
    what is the best shampoo for scalp Psoriasis?
    how can I get rid of the plaque Psoriasis on my scalp

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the market (just google "natural treatment of scalp psoriasis") Some of them do actually work. For my scalp psor. I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: Champori comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work - it's free.
      Cheers,
      Stella

  8. QUESTION:
    What's good against Scalp Psoriasis?
    I live in the UK, I have psoriasis on my scalp and skin. I use Doublebase cream to keep my skin in check but don't know what to use for my scalp. My doctor gave me nizerol shampoo which didn't work. Any ideas anyone? Preferably something over the counter. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Psoriasis shampoos are mostly for maintenance and not for treatment. You need to get yourself a proper lotion to treat the condition.

      I've used almost every product available and I've found Propiosalic to be the best. It's not oily when most products for scalp psoriasis are, so you don't have to wash your hair 4-5 times to get it off and cause more flakes.
      It's under 4 dollars ( 3.40 E here in Greece ). Ask your pharmacist. It contains salicylic acid which does wonders for the scalp. You apply it 1-2 times a day and let it dry out. It dries out in about 30 minutes and you don't need to wash your hair afterwards at all. It does not smell when it's dried out and it's not noticeable and it clears the scalp completely in a few days ( always depending on the severity ).

      You can use nizerol shampoo to keep it this way longer.
      Keep in mind that psoriasis shampoos do not contain cosmetic ingredients so they won't make your hair look nice and shiny. So you can wash your hair with the nizerol, massage the scalp, rinse with water and then apply your normal everyday shampoo without massaging. You should avoid head and shoulders and any other harsh shampoos that interfere with the scalp ph.

      Gluck

  9. QUESTION:
    What is a good soap to use for scalp psorasis?
    I Shave my head so I Want to know about soap not shampoo. i am tired of scraping dead skin off of my scalp.

    • ANSWER:
      Tar shampoo is usually the first line therapy for scalp psoriasis. If you prefer not to use the shampoo, it is important that you choose a non-drying "soap." Dryness and irritation caused by harsh cleansers can make psoriasis worse. Two gentle cleansers are Cetaphil (see cleanser or body wash called Restoraderm) and Vanicream (a bar soap for sensitive skin).

      Moisturize your scalp after showering to help counteract the dryness and capture moisture. Try a thicker non-fragrance moisturizer like Lubriderm (or generic variety) twice a day.

      If you have thick scaling you may need to get a prescription from a medical provider for one of the following treatments:
      Keralyt: salicylic acid (6%)
      Dovonex: Vitamin D analog
      Topical steroid: Triamcinolone, Clobetasol, etc. (when using apply sparingly into affected area)

      If you have related itching, then use an over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone cream.

      Psoriasis may be due to family history, but it has also been related to infection, stress, smoking, and various medications (e.g. antimalarials, beta-blockers, and lithium).

  10. QUESTION:
    should i was shampoo more or less with scalp psoriasis?
    i have mild scalp psoriasis. should i shampoo more or less? i normally shampoo every other day - to not dry out my hair. i dye my hair and flat iron so i tried to always moisturize. shampooing everyday dries out my hair. i have flare up on my scalp from time to time. should i shampoo more or less?
    and does creams and scalp oil help or makes the psoriasis worst? i use a scalp oil by phyto. it helps with the itching but dont know if it makes things worse when i wash it out.

    • ANSWER:
      I shampoo once a day and have no problem. For my scalp psor. the cream/spray combo from Champori.com works the best. I recommend that you should try it: it is natural, steroid-free and works fast.
      Cheers,
      SK

  11. QUESTION:
    what shampoo is good for scalp psoriasis?
    i have scalp psoriasis and it has gotten pretty bad. i was wondering if anyone had a good idea for shampoos or hair masks or anything that may help. thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Salcura Shampoo .. recommend you research it.
      I've read reviews from actual users, that have scalp psoriasis and they said it was the best they've found.

      We used Salcura Dermaspray on our child's eczema and it was 10 times more effective than all other products we tried.

  12. QUESTION:
    what is the best shampoo for scalp psoriasis?
    any thoughts

    • ANSWER:
      Supposedly Selsun Blue help psoriasis. I tried it but with no success. For the last 6 months I use champori proriasis spray and cream and the result is remarkable, now only very stubborn spots remain and very reduced too. Try it, cream is a bit greasy and not easy to apply with long hair, but it works great.
      Yoko

  13. QUESTION:
    shampoo for psoriasis?
    Is there any shampoo/or cream that can be used for psoriasis of the scalp? its for my bf. he itches then it hurts. anything to make it go or help with the irritation?

    • ANSWER:
      I think you ll find that most Shampoos for Psoriasis have a large component of Sulphur .
      A Homoeopathic doctor can advise you how to control Psoriasis
      I would urge you to go it would do your general health good to have a checkup.

  14. QUESTION:
    What is the best shampoo for psoriasis of the scalp.?
    For the last 2-3 years i have had really bad psoriasis on my scalp. I hate it so much and i would really just love to get rid of it. It is like dandruff on steriods, huge chunks of skin, blood, itching. I can not cut my hair because of all the red spots under it. I would like to know if anyone recommends a certain shampoo. Not necacerrally (i know i spelled wrong) to get rid of the red spots, but to atleast reduce the flakes, itching, stinging (when putting anything on it) and at certain times pus. Thanks!
    I don't know if the fact that i do not have a very balanced diet is affecting it, ever since i stopped eating meat and cut down on my protein (about 2 years ago) it does seem to have been getting worse.

    • ANSWER:
      I feel your pain.

      I have tried a lot of over the counter tar shampoos, and I never found any real relief there... They had a terrible odour too P: The only shampoo that ever worked for me was this lovely natural shampoo, and it came with a matching conditioner, that I found at the health food store.

      It is called Psoriasis Itchy Scalp and it is by Herbal Glo. It didn't sting and it pretty much cleared up my psoriasis, in the winter too! (Sun usually helps psoriasis). It did dry out my hair a bit though, just warning you, haha.

      Not sure if it will work for you (or if you'll be able to find it wherever you are xD)... I think I have a mild case of psoriasis, and I only get it on my scalp x) Good luck to you though! I hope you find some relief, friend :)

  15. QUESTION:
    Anyone help Scalp Psoriasis?
    Anyone suffer from it and find any treatments that work to get rid of your scalp psoriasis?
    I've suffered from severe hair loss because of SP. It's been an extremely humiliating process. My head is always itchy and flaky/scaly, red in areas and bumps in several areas.
    It's a very difficult situation and what my dermatologist has prescribed for me (many strong topical steroids) have not done any good :(

    If anyone has any suggestions of treatments that have helped them I would greatly appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      Shampoo (and conditioner) with tea tree oil is great. Paul Mitchell makes a shampoo & conditioner, but I also found the "generic" brand at Sally Hansen Beauty supply works just as well (and half the price). I use this and I like it better than the shampoos that are made for psoriasis because it doesn't seem to completely dry my hair out. And, it seems to work just as well.

      Also, depending on your hair type, try to shampoo your hair as little as possible. I wash mine every other day or longer depending on any hair products I may have used.

  16. QUESTION:
    scalp psoriasis?
    i have it and ive noticed that it only happens when i moved to alberta to my girlfriends house. Now ive noticed that it goes away in b.c. where my parents live but it comes back everytime i come up to alberta. So i was thinking it could be due to the dryer climate in alberta or it could be due to the food that we eat. See my parents are filipino so our diet consist mostly of rice and veges and meat while my gfs family are white and they eat alot of bread which i barely ate while living with my parents. ANy thoughts. Does anyone have a over the counter treatment that doesnt need a perscription i was thinking selsun blue cause thats what i used before i moved out but now i use fructus
    no my skin just itches when i get wet and i dont dry myself off fast enough but i guess thats normal. I also do have a few flaky spots on my body but they arent bad. The one thing i found that helps with the gross bumpy feeling of psoriasis on my body is to take a shaving razor to it. It smooths it out and it doesnt hurt

    • ANSWER:
      I use T Gel! It works like magic. :)

      As for everything else- No one knows what make psoriasis pop up, but it could be the weather, food you eat, or even stress.

      T Gel with stop flaking and redness, and it's the best non-prescription formula there is. It's a shampoo, but I also use a prescription, a bottle of clear liquid I apply after showers. Talk to your doctor.

      I was also wondering if you get any weird rashes randomly, after you get out of water-?

  17. QUESTION:
    Best Treatment for Scalp Psoriasis..?
    I have just been diagnosed with Scalp Psoriasis, but i've had it for 2 years now, im 17 and i reallyy hate it. Its a major downer on my self confidence, as it flakes all the time.
    Its in horrible thick clumps, and i've tried so many shampoos, and things. I've tried T/Gel, Ketopine, and Nizorel, some which were prescribed to me, and non have worked, or have made it worse..
    Is there is any shampoo or treatment i could use to make it better? Or any ingredients i should look for shampoo without?
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      Diprosalic Scalp Application, (betamethasone dipropionate and salicylic acid,) together with Polytar shampoo should help.

  18. QUESTION:
    Scalp psoriasis help?
    I have had really bad scalp psoriasis for the past 11 years. I am 18 and I have tried everything. I have seen a dermatologist, tried steroid creams, head and shoulders, selsun blue, lotions, but it never goes away. It is embarrassing and annoying. Any other suggestions

    • ANSWER:
      First of all shampoos for psoriasis are only for maintenance and not for treatment.

      Head and shoulders, utrex and all those shampoos for Dandruff seem to help a bit at start but they are extremely harsh for the scalp. Scalp gets used to them quickly so they just stop working. The worst part is that they change the ph of the scalp and no other treatment will help in the future. So it's better to stop using them.

      Get yourself a shampoo with tar in it. They are not harsh at all and they work great to keep a clean scalp.

      As I mentioned you need a proper treatment. A lotion that is not oily, so it does not need lots of washes to go away and that actually does the job. I've used almost every product available all those years trying to find the best for me and I've found that Propiosalic lotion is the best.
      It contains salicylic acid which removes the flakes and clears up the scalp. You apply it 1-2 times an let it dry out. It dries out in a bout half an hour and you don't have to wash your hair at all afterwards or the next day. It does not smell when it's dried and it's not noticeable. It clears the scalp completely in a few days ( 3-5 ) if applied daily or every other day.
      Works every time and it's under 4 dollars. Ask your pharmacist or your dermatologist.

      Use the tar shampoo if needed to keep the scalp clean for longer. My psoriasis is really aggressive and usually spots keep coming back after a treatment but my scalp psoriasis is under control and I only need to use the lotion when I get a flair up.

      Psoriasis shampoos do not contain cosmetic ingredients so they are made to make your hair nice and shiny, so you could wash your hair with the tar shampoo first, massage the scalp with it, rinse with water and then use your everyday shampoo ( a mild one not head and shoulders ) without massaging.

      The scalp will get clear with the lotion and you might not even need to keep using a psoriasis shampoo but if your scalp psoriasis is really aggressive at the moment you can help it a bit more this way.

      Gluck

  19. QUESTION:
    could I have scalp psoriasis?
    I have a scalp problem. It's like I have dandruff, except really bad. It's more like a crust that flakes off in larger chunks and it's only in the hair right behind both temples and ears. It doesn't itch except when the crusts start coming loose. And when I scratch them off my scalp is all red and moist underneath.

    I've used dandruff shampoo (Head and Shoulders, and yes I leave it on for 5 whole minutes) for about a month now with no help. So I'm starting to wonder if it could be something else like scalp psoriasis or something.

    Help please?

    Oh and I'm 25 years old, VERY stressed (doctoral student), and eating a normal healthy diet.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be psoriasis or eczema or any kind of dermatitis. Scalp conditions are difficult to diagnose. But they all tend to flare up at the increased stress. Reducing stress (yoga, running, working out) will definitely help. If it does turn out to be a psoriasis you should try the indigo naturalis ointment : it works rather well.

  20. QUESTION:
    Scalp Psoriasis**HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?
    ***I have a MOJOR case of scalp psoriasis and I have gone to doctors and used RX shampoos-oils-ointments and NOTHING works!! Does ANYONE have any remedys that help? I am almost to a depressed state because of this.....its taking over my life almost........HELP_HELP_HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! PLEASE

    • ANSWER:
      I've had moderate/severe psoriasis for 23 years now, and quit using the prescription ointments/topical liquids that my doctor was prescribing about 2 years ago since they were no longer helping. Since the ointment and the liquid (which I used for my scalp psoriasis) were very strong medications I was wary of going on anything else my doctor might come up with to try on me, and I'm not comfortable with the idea of going on the meds that suppress your immune system.

      I've found a over the counter medication to be surprisingly helpful, it's called "Skin Zinc". I picked it up at Walgreens but you could probably find it at any major drug store. It comes in a box which contains a liquid and an ointment. Both could be used on the scalp as the ointment isn't a really greasy one like so many psoriasis RX ointments I've tried. It's active ingredient works by loosening the dead skin that builds up on the patches of psoriasis helping it to fall off easier and more quickly which drastically reduces the itching (pretty much helping to make the patches behave more like normal skin where dead skin just falls off instead of building up). I find that instead of white flakes on my clothing being a constant problem they are now rarely seen.

      Hope that helps!!

  21. QUESTION:
    scalp psoriasis?
    Does anybody have any home remedies for getting rid of scalp psoriasis

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, I have a great remedy, but unfortunately the plants are only available in Asia.

      It is fantastic, I suffered from scalp psoriasis, nearly lost all my hair, one application of this remedy and its gone and never come back. I still use the remedy every fortnight just in case.

      another one which used to work for is :-

      Mix together 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 teaspoon of lime juice. Apply it all onto the hair and massage into the scalp. Tie either a cloth of any kind around your head. Shampoo the following morning.

      This only worked for a few months.

  22. QUESTION:
    IS oily scalp an indication for psoriasis?
    Hi is oily scalp an indication for psoriasis? i have an lily sclap and needs to go for headbath daily please suggest me a solution for this?

    • ANSWER:
      No oily scalp does not indicate psoriasis. Dry and flaky scalp does.

      Use a proper shampoo for oily scalp. Do not use a lot of shampoo while in the shower, just a tiny bit. Massage the scalp really well before you rinse with water. For oily scalp it's really important to wash your hair really well and get it all out. This way your hair will stay normal for more and you won't need to wash them again the next day.

      Do not wash your hair everyday because the natural oils protect the hair and the scalp's ph balance so they are needed for a healthy scalp and hair. Wash your hair every other day.

      You can use a dry shampoo if your hair get oily the next day. It's a great alternative for oily scalp/hair.

      Gluck

  23. QUESTION:
    scalp psoriasis?
    i have this and nothing is helping.im goin nuts.ive tried dandruff shampoos,dermarest,tgel,coal shampoos.my hair is so thick too its hard to comb it all out if i try.anyone have this problem?what helps it?

    • ANSWER:
      hey I have this disease, really I been hading it since 11 years.
      I have it in my head and joints.
      I tried xango and psoriasis is off. NO more stress.

  24. QUESTION:
    Scalp psoriasis remedies?
    I have severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. I use Enbrel, an expensive biologic drug that works for the arthritis but not so much the skin stuff- especially scalp. I alternate coal tar shampoo and Sal acid shampoo, used topical steroids to no avail. Any advice?
    I know, I wish coal tar worked. The thing about UV is I would need to shave my lovely locks (not really). I haven't seen my scalp but I imagine it is pretty pitted and scarred from the chunks of dead skin I pick off of it constantly (not exaggerating) so I would rather not shave my head- though tempting.

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend anti-psoriasis treatment from serenaskin.com. I've used it for my scalp psoriasis and it worked very well for me. Ointment and spray cleared the scalp and i take anti-psoriasis extract twice a year for prevention purposes.

  25. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis... cures?
    I have psoriasis on my scalp, have tried coal tar and all those horrible things to get rid of it... nothing works!

    Anyone have any experience/ ideas of other ways to treat this bugger of a problem!?

    • ANSWER:
      Scalp psoriasis (or dandruff) can be treated by medicated shampoo. If the one prescribed to you doesn't work, perhaps because it was compatible with your skin type so find one that does. Also, try using fine tooth comb to remove the loose flakes, and take showers in the morning. This will give you scalp a chance to build up natural oils to combat the dryness. Try using herbal or natural remedies to lessen the irritation.

  26. QUESTION:
    Best regular shampoos for psoriasis?
    You know the stuff you can find at walmart that isn't too expensive.

    Is it the womens shampoos? Because I don't think the mens shampoos are going to be it they are just basic. The female shampoos have extra stuff in it.

    I have tried axe and Gillette they are not that good.

    • ANSWER:
      I get a mild case of psoriasis on my scalp and behind my ear from time to time. My dermatologist had me use Neutogena's T/Gel shampoo once a week on my scalp. Basically his instructions was to wash my hair with it but instead of washing and rinsing he said to massage it into my scalp and let it sit on my head for 10 minutes then I could rinse my hair and condition as usual. It tingles and the smell is OK but it really works! You can get that at WalMart & I don't think its that much. Plus you only use it once a week so it should last you a while. I put the link so you can read up on the T/Gel shampoo yourself. Hope this helped!

  27. QUESTION:
    Can you please give me a list of good shampoo's for scalp psoriasis?
    Thanks people

    • ANSWER:
      Most medicated shampoos will work on psoriasis but for best results ask your pharmacist for something containing coal tar. Unfortunately all such shampoos that I've tried do smell quite badly but if you rinse your hair very well after using it you shouldn't notice the smell too much, and it's worth it for the relief it brings.

  28. QUESTION:
    WATER FASTING AND SCALP PSORIASIS PLEASE ANSWER!!!!!!?
    Hello, I have scalp psoriasis and I was wondering if a 30 day water fast will cure it? And what type of shampoo should I use on the fast, and what will happen if I just randomly eat anything? Will my scalp get even worse? And what type of food should I eat while on the fast? Thank you so much for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      British product Salcura Shampoo has reviews by users with scalp psoriasis, as the best they have found.

      The salcura products are amazing for psoriasis and eczema. We used Salcura dermaspray gentle on our child with complete success. it was 10 times more effective then everything else we tried to stop him itching and heal the inflamed skin.

  29. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis?
    no one in my family has it but i was diagnosed with psoriasis the beginning of last summer. Has anyone ever fought the disease... im young and ive seen pics of people with all over their forhead and their back and knees and pretty much everywhere....thankfully you cannot tell that i have it, but i dont want to keep worrying if it will ruin my life or not,,, i just wanted to know if anyone that has it has used anything to get rid of it or reduce it????

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      There are many effective topical treatments. While many can be purchased over the counter (OTC), others are available by prescription only.

      Over-the-counter topicals
      Salicylic acid
      Also known as "sal acid," salicylic acid helps remove scales and is often combined with topical steroids, anthralin or tar to enhance effectiveness. Available in both OTC and prescription forms.

      Tar
      Coal tar is available in topical, shampoo and bath solution forms. Tar can help slow the rapid proliferation of skin cells and help reduce inflammation, itching and scaling. It can also be used in combination with phototherapy.

      Other OTC topicals
      Information about bath solutions, moisturizers and nonprescription medications that can be used to moisturize, soothe, remove scale or relieve itching.

      Prescription topicals
      Anthralin
      This prescription topical can be very effective in treating plaque psoriasis. It does not work as quickly or as thoroughly as superpotent topical steroids, but unlike steroids, it has no known long-term side effects.

      Dovonex
      A form of synthetic vitamin D3 that slows down the rate of skin cell growth, flattens psoriasis lesions and removes scale. Dovonex also can be used on the scalp and for nail psoriasis.

      Taclonex
      This prescription ointment contains calcipotriene (the active ingredient in Dovonex) and the potent steroid betamethasone dipropionate. The calcipotriene slows down the rate of skin cell growth, flattens psoriasis lesions and removes scale, while the steroid helps reduce inflammation and itch.

      Tazorac
      Available as a presciption gel or cream (also known by its generic name tazarotene), Tazorac is a vitamin A derivative and is also known as a topical retinoid. It can be used on the face, scalp and nails.

      Topical steroids
      Corticosteroids, ordinarily called "steroids" by doctors and patients, are routinely used to treat psoriasis. Topical steroid medications can be very effective in controlling mild to moderate psoriasis lesions. They are easy to use and work relatively quickly. Most are available by prescription.

      Phototherapy involves exposing the skin to wavelengths of ultraviolet light under medical supervision. Treatments usually take place in a doctor's office or psoriasis clinic. However, it is possible to follow a treatment regimen at home with a unit prescribed by your doctor. The key to success with phototherapy is consistency.

      UVB phototherapy

      UVB treatment involves exposing the skin to an artificial UVB light source for a set length of time on a regular schedule, either under a doctor's direction in a medical setting or with a home unit purchased with a doctor's prescription.

      PUVA

      PUVA is an acronym for psoralen (a light-sensitizing medication) combined with exposure to ultraviolet light A (UVA). UVA, like UVB, is found in sunlight. By itself, however, UVA is not usually used to clear psoriasis. It is relatively ineffective unless used with a light-sensitizing medication such as psoralen.

      Lasers

      Targeted UVB treatment and pulsed dye lasers can be used to treat chronic localized plaque lesions.

  30. QUESTION:
    Home remedies for itchy scalp-psoriasis?
    Doctor prescribes Head & Shoulders Critical Care shampoo and Kenalog spray. Has has not helped at all after several weeks. Diagnosis is psoriasis. Affected area is about the size of a hand on one side of scalp.

    • ANSWER:
      Try natural treatment. I cleared my scalp psoriasis with serenaskin psoriasis herbal remedies. I applied spray and ointment and took psoriasis extract. This treatment cleared my psoriasis in a couple of weeks.

  31. QUESTION:
    Really bad scalp psoriasis?
    My scalp itches SO bad! My psoriasis has gotten worse over the years & I cannot afford to go see a dermatologist at the moment. My hairline/forehead has a discolored patch because of the psoriasis & it won't go away! I've tried so many different shampoos. Idk what I'm doing wrong. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Take over the counter antihistamines until the irritation subsides and the damage you've done so far is reduced so your scalp can heal.

      Wash your hair only once a week with tar based shampoo.

      Without risking skin cancer, get a little sun onto your hair and scalp.

      Put small amounts of non allergenic hand moisturiser into your hair (yes into your hair) where you are feeling the irritation morning and night. Reduce this to once a day once the irritation subsides.

      If you can live with this, shave your head (sorry if you are female).

  32. QUESTION:
    what is the danger of scalp psoriasis?

    • ANSWER:
      In itself scalp psoriasis is not dangerous. Yes open sores can cause secondary infections. If you haven't seen a doctor you may want to consider it. There are numerous excellent medicines available. A trick that the doctors in my office recommend is applying the psoriasis medicated shampoo (otc or prescription) to dry scalp and letting it rest for about 10-15 minutes before wetting and shampooing.

      Hope this helps.

  33. QUESTION:
    Do I Have Scalp Psoriasis?
    I have some type of skin condition covering about 80% of my scalp. I'm not sure if it's psoriasis or not, but my father has psoriasis really bad.

    Here are 2 pics.

    And also, if it is psoriasis, what can I do? I've used every shampoo out there and nothing.

    Right side:
    http://i36.tinypic.com/1r6pw6.jpg

    Left side:
    http://i34.tinypic.com/149a9ky.jpg
    Also, whenever I pick at it, a sticky fluid comes from it.

    It itches real bad too

    • ANSWER:
      It looks like scalp psoriasis.
      The main cause of psoriasis is overreaction of the immune system. I try to eat healthy food and avoid stress as much as I can in order to prevent flare-ups.
      After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments.
      Now I use herbal remedies from serenaskin.com, which aim at the root of the disease - the immune system, and are steroid-free.
      After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my scalp has been cleared up and now I just continue with anti-psoriasis extract, which controls the immune system. My scalp has been clear for months now.
      It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed.

  34. QUESTION:
    help with scalp psoriasis or ezcema?
    I have these red oval stuff around my hairline and on the back of my neck at the scalp and a lot of redness behind my ears. It itches but not a lot but it looks terrible and difficult to cover with make up. Last year I went to the dermat. because I had another scalp condition that was like "glue" stock to each root of my hair. To give you an idea, if I had shaved my hair off, my scalp was cover all over in white cap (sorry the doc just told me Psoriasis nothing else) and if you tried to scratched it off or get rid off it with your hands, the entire hair will come off with a white tip. I HAVE BEEN READING pages and pages on the internet and THOUGHT MY NEW condition was Scalp Psoriasis or Guttate Psoriasis but THEN GOT confused with BAD CASE of Ezcema...Can someone tell me which one is it?. Please if you have info about foods that may be causing all these horrible conditions. PLEASE HELP!!!! Funny thing is I have a very, very long black hair that EVERYONE compliments ALL THE TIME! Thank you all for helping so much...I read Stella,Rusky and Jam comments about Psoriasis.

    • ANSWER:
      have you tried a coal tar shampoo, scalp psoriasis quite often responds to a coal tar based shampoo you can get them over the counter without a prescription.

  35. QUESTION:
    Psoriasis & Swollen Glands?
    Hi, I've had Psoriasis on my scalp for about 12 yrs (I'm 26/Female) and never had success with treatments and just have to be careful with my shampoo but other than that never had any problems with it and it never bothered me until recently. It flared up really bad and is now moving down along my hairline onto my face, eyebrows and behind ears. Also around the same time I've developed two small lumps on my neck and on visiting a consultant last wk she told me their more than likely linked to my Psoriasis.

    I'm just wondering if anyone else can relate to this or had similar problems? I'm kinda finding it hard to convince myself that the lumps are connected to the Psoriasis.

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Scalp psoriasis is very common. In fact, at least
      half of all people who have psoriasis have it on
      their scalp. As with psoriasis elsewhere on the body,
      skin cells grow too quickly on the scalp and cause red
      lesions covered with scale.
      Scalp psoriasis can be very mild, with slight, fine
      scaling. It can also be very severe with thick, crusted
      plaques covering the entire scalp. Psoriasis can extend
      beyond the hairline onto the forehead, the back of the
      neck and around the ears. Most of the time, people
      with scalp psoriasis have psoriasis on other parts of
      their body as well. For some, the scalp is the only
      affected area.
      Other skin disorders, such as seborrheic dermatitis,
      may look similar to psoriasis. However, there are
      differences. Scalp psoriasis scales appear powdery with
      a silvery sheen, while seborrheic dermatitis scales often
      appear yellowish and greasy. Despite these differences,
      the two conditions can be easily confused.
      hoW is scalp psoriasis treated?
      Many treatment options can help control scalp
      psoriasis and its symptoms. Sometimes scalp psoriasis
      will clear on its own, or it can remain on the scalp for
      long periods.
      It is important to select scalp treatments that are
      agreeable to you. Treatments should never be worse
      than the psoriasis itself. Consider your lifestyle,
      available time and the cost to help you decide among
      the options.

  36. QUESTION:
    Best Medicine for SCALP PSORIASIS..?
    need help..plsss

    • ANSWER:
      I've developed scalp psoriasis six years ago and still have it. So I know what you are going through. My heart goes out to you. I've been to the best Dermatology center in Dallas and used several scalp medication such as Derma-smoothe oil, Taclonex(used sample only because it cost 0) and started on another medication this week called Clobetasol Propionate Solution which seems to be working. The next best thing the doctor told me, would to get laser treatments twice a week in Dallas, but I live about an hour away from there, so I'm hoping the Clobetasol works. I've let my gray hair grow out so the scales doesn't show as much and I know that sunlight helps, so I keep my hair short and try to expose my head to the sun.
      Go to a dermatologist and get some stronger medication that would at least help with the itching and the scales. The store shampoo do not work. Hope you can get the help you need. Good luck

  37. QUESTION:
    Polytar Shampoo for psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis on my scalp and since having my first child it seems to have got much worse. (Maybe stress with a new baby?!)

    Has anyone tried Polytar? My doctor prescribed it a few years ago however I cant remember what it was like and I haven't used anything for my psoriasis in a long time. I was planning to buy it from the chemist.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      I've not tried that but i used to get quite a lot of success with the T-Gel brand shampoo. My psoriasis isn't as bad on my scalp as other places though so maybe it wouldn't be strong enough for you but could be worth a try

  38. QUESTION:
    Professional Cosmetologist Question: Best shampoo for scalp psoriasis?
    I have a cosmetology license, but currently do not work in a salon. I have a relative who suffers from scalp psoriasis which causes flaking and dandruff but does not see a doctor for it. I would like to buy some good shampoo for her, but have no idea which brand works the best. She asks me to trim her hair, so I see this condition and would like to help her. She also has psoriasis on her neck. I think she should get a prescription from a doctor but she isn't doing that for some reason. Any professional products in the salon supply stores I could buy for her?

    • ANSWER:
      You are beautiful no matter what so don't worry about the outside the inside is what matters you shouldn't care what others think. You rock to much!
      Allie

  39. QUESTION:
    Shampoo for psoriasis scalp?
    i have psoriasis dry thing hair but my scalp gets very oily and i have to wash my hair EVERYDAY. whats a good shamppo or treatment that will get rid of this problem?
    i'v been to a dermatoligitst and he gave me a medicated shampoo that relives the itching but my scalp is still really oily

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    Any suggestion for home remedy treatment for body, scalp and nail psoriasis?

    • ANSWER:
      I have used Denorex Shampoo to help with my scalp psoriasis. I use it twice a week instead of my reg. shampoo. I may tingle but it works it seams to be the only thing that works for me. I have used those other shampoos and They don't wash out of my hair( I have very thick hair). And doesn't seam to do the job.
      I get psoriasis so bad that I get it on my face. It takes care of that also. So just by using it may help your hands also. Not a home remedy but It's worth a try.
      You can find it in any store. It is about a bottle but does last a long time. Hope this helps.


best shampoo for scalp psoriasis