Urea Cream For Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    treatment options
    I know what it is. I just want alternative treatment options other than what i've already used.

    • ANSWER:
      Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  2. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I was diagnosed with KP when I was a child and it's not as bad as it was then. But how would I get rid of it or tone it down? I hate having small red bump on my upper arms and on my chest! It's quite annoying.

    Anyone know how to get rid of it or at least tone it down?

    • ANSWER:
      Exfolliation with a loofah will help, but there are also medications.

      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.

      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.

      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system.

      Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.

      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  3. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris...?
    I've had these red bumps on my upper arms for while now and from reading a number of articles and looking at pictures, I'm pretty sure that its KP... Does anyone know why it happens? How to make it go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      * Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      * Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

      Hope this helps!

  4. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?!?
    Okay, so I was recently diagnosed with the skin condition Keratosis Pilaris.

    (sucks)

    I was just wondering, people out there with it too, what worked best for you at relieving it?

    i was prescribed Differin, a Retin-A type ointment.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is an extremely common and benign disorder of keratinized hair follicles. Etiology is unknown, although it may be due to a disorder of corneocyte adhesion that prevents normal desquamation in the area around the follicle.

      Medical Care

      Education and reassurance are the cornerstones of therapy for keratosis pilaris.
      The noninflamed horny papules usually remit with age and increasing time, but they are resistant to most forms of short-term therapy.
      Encourage tepid showers instead of hot baths, along with the use of mild soaps and a home humidifier.
      An emollient cream may help alleviate rough surfaces in mild cases. A topical keratolytic agent such as lactic acid, salicylic acid, or urea preparations may be beneficial in more extensive cases. Several recent reports claim good results with 2-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. Topical tretinoin therapy has also been used with varying degrees of success.
      Lesions with significant inflammation may improve with the use of medium-potency emollient-based topical steroid preparations. Inflammation is usually reduced markedly by 7 days, at which point the steroid should be discontinued.

  5. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris???
    I have it and I heard it gets better with products that contain Urea and KP Duty works good too,but I want to know if that is true or anything that may be better.I also know that it get's better over time im 13 so what do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      Besides urea, moisturizers with alpha hydroxys (like glycolic acid, lactic acid or ammonium lactate) or with salicylic acid are also helpful at smoothing the skin and making it more comfortable. Cream based moisturizers work better than lotion based moisturizers.

  6. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    anyone else here have the condition? if so which cream do you use and what do you find most effective in helping it out

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris; treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, Retin-A, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha-hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Keratosis pilaris often improves with age, and can even disappear completely by middle-age. Some, however, will have keratosis pilaris for life.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, swell, and even multiply. In some cases, they will bleed and/or scar.

  7. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?
    I have keratosis pilaris. It's a skin disorder that makes little white bumps on your arms where you have hair and dry skin. I thought that they were pimples so i would pop them. A white almost solid substance comes out...what is it?!? i don't think it's puss...help!

    • ANSWER:
      Because keratosis pilaris causes little blocked pore ducts, they very often appear just like little pimples with tiny amount of pus in them.

      What you want to do is make sure you have a good exfolliant wash with alpha hydroxy or urea in it and use it every other day with a buff puff. The next thing you want is intensive moisture like CeraVe Cream (available at many drug stores) that you apply after your shower after patting dry.

      Sometimes an anti-biotic such as tetracycline can reduce the inflammation in the pores and make the keratosis pilaris much less unsightly.

      If you go on the American Academy of Dermatology web pages, you will get the best treatment ideas that you can discuss with your dermatologist.

      The products I described above are available over the counter other than the anti-biotic.

      You condition is harmless, not contagious and not infectious, so don't worry. Just treat it to make it look better for your own happiness.

  8. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?!?
    I have had contradicting opinions. Is it ok to use lotions with Petrolium and other heavier moisturzing agents in them? or will it clog the pores, I have found that the body butters and thicker creams are the only things that help make my skin smooth. Now i'm not sure if they clog my pores and make the KP worst?!

    I was perscribed a lotion, havent used it long enough to see if it works, but my skin is still a little dry I think i will need to use another lotion in addition to it i think, plus one for the non kp parts of my body

    • ANSWER:
      First of all, it sounds like you have taken great steps towards controlling your Keratosis Pilaris, or KP as it is often called. As long as you do not experience any inflammation (such as symptoms of itching, pain, redness, etc.), you can try to layer your Lachydrin with your Lustra, but use your Retin A solo at bedtime. Since alpha hydroxy acids (lachydrin is lactic acid which falls into this category) help soften the skin and hydrate as well, this allows a better absorption of other products. So apply Lachydrin first, give it a few minutes to dry and then apply your Lustra. Also, KP can definitely be accompanied by skin discoloration, whether brown or more of a reddish purple. The skin bleach with help with the brown discoloration. If you have reddness, then you may want to try Mederma. Also, if you need to give more of a blast to your KP to smooth out the skin, you may want to consider alternating your lachydrin with Carmol 20 Cream as urea is quite helpful or even use Epilyt Lotion periodically. The propylene glycol helps smooth out the bumps. I usually have the patient apply Epilyt Lotion at night as it is a bit oily. Use it sparingly for this reason. If you have not had the opportunity to read through my article on this topic, Keratosis Pilaris you may find it helpful. Our product DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin contains glycolic acid and urea and has achieved great clinical results. Take a look at our DERMAwizard for Keratosis Pilaris which you should find helpful.

      For more info, check out these...
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/singlefaq.asp?FAQid=7717&AID=207717

      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/kp-rubra-faceii-red-face-flushing-blushing/2831-keratosis-pilaris-lack-arm-shape.html

      http://www.makeuptalk.com/forums/f12/keratosis-pelaris-41317.html

      : ) Good luck! : )

  9. QUESTION:
    my keratosis pilaris...?
    It seems to be better when I don't touch it, when I put the stuff my doctor perscribed me, I break out and It gets red and more noticable, should I leave, or continue with the cream so it'll dissapear?

    • ANSWER:
      I recommend, first and foremost, that you speak with your doctor about your condition to find out exactly what causes your outbreaks. A lot of lotions can irritate this condition and cause more outbreaks, and some experimentation might be needed. You should perhaps do a little research online (use google and search for keratosis pilaris for starters). There are a wealth of really helpful websites out there for people with this condition. I have linked to one below.

      Here is some information I found during a search:

      Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition commonly seen on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. The skin cells that normally flake off as a fine dust from the skin form plugs in the hair follicles. These appear as small pimples that have a dry ''sandpaper'' feeling. They are usually white but sometimes rather red. They usually don't itch or hurt.

      Keratosis pilaris is particularly common in teenagers on the upper arms. It may occur in babies where it tends to be most obvious on the cheeks. It may remain for years but generally gradually disappears usually before age 30. Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. It is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out, and may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  10. QUESTION:
    Makeup to cover keratosis pilaris?
    so I have keratosis Pilaris on my arms and a bit on my thighs. I'm somewhat tan, so they're not technically red, but you can see the white bumps. I'm 15, had this since I was 9, and I've had enough. I tried moisturizing, exfoliating, whatever, but nothing happened. so I'm going for makeup. I've heard of Sally hansen airbrush legs, but I saw one review including KP and said it didn't work. so any other suggestions? maybe a liquid foundation? but it has to look natural and be in the drugstore. it's getting hot and I've been wearing hoodies and long sleeved shirts since september. please help?

    thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      this isn't makeup, but you can try urea cream or retin a i heard it works, i have keratosis pilaris too and i'm gonna try it whenever i get to the pharmacy to buy it i have prescription retin A so i'll try it and see if it works, i hear exfoliating only make it worse. so try to not do that.

  11. QUESTION:
    Keratosis and Pilaris and UREA?
    Urine has urea so if I "pee" on my arms with bumps (eeeew, but if it is effctive, why not) will it improve my skin?

    keratosis pilaris is like permanent goosebumps usually on ur forearms. UREA is said to make the appearance better

    • ANSWER:
      No, it will not improve your skin ! Urea is found in urine, but in very very very small amounts, and not enough to improve the skin on your arms.

      Keratosis Pilaris is a genetic disorder, so there is not a true true. You can manage it better by washing with a "buff puff" pad or one of those soft nylon bath sponges. Use a good quality moisterizer (Purpose, Amlactin, Neutrogena, or DML if you can find DML) daily. This will help lessen the keratotic plugs.

      Urea creams are great too !!

      Hope this helps

  12. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 14 and i noticed these tiny little reddish bumps all over my arms especially at the back of my upper arm. my doctor told me it was keratosis pilaris but there was no cure for it.
    its pretty ugly to be honest and quite noticeable. ive researched it on the interent and its known as quite a hard thing to treat.but some people have found that some things like exfoliation work.
    what do you recommend? ive tried exfoliating it when i can and using a deep moisturizer. plus ive done a bit of sunbathing which is supposed to help but it made some of them go white! i tried putting on E45 which is for dry skin but still no luck. ive had it for a while now and it is really annoying!

    any help would be good. i live near boots and chemists. (im asthmatic) (some asthmatic people cant use certain creams my doc said apparantly but generally they are all fine)

    thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      KP is very common, I have it as well. I also work for a dermatologist. The best thing for your arms would be a 6% salisylic acid lotion like Salex. It really softens up the skin and makes it much better which can be used once or twice a day. Occasionally you can use a 40% urea cream that will really soft it up but you would want to use that sparingly. Unfortunatly those are both perscription only. I don't think you can get much help from over the counter products good luck.

  13. QUESTION:
    6% salicylic acid in 10% urea for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I just went down to the pharmacy and ordered this mix. I wasn't sure about the percentage of urea though, but I knew that 6% salicylic acid was basically optimal and as high as you'd want to go. I'd thought that the urea would take up the other 94% and didn't know it was a sand-like compounds to be included in the mix of cream. Anyway, I decided to go with 10% while I was down there along with the advice of the pharmacist, but she didn't really know what it was for. So is 10% urea optimal?

    • ANSWER:
      6% salicylic acid is a good treatment level for keratosis pilaris -- it is the percentage used in Keralyt gel. 10% urea is also a good percentage for KP. Carmol 10, a commonly-recommended cream for KP, contains this exact amount of urea (without the salicylic acid).

      You will want to be careful using both of these together, as you experience significant redness, peeling, and sensitivity if you have not used this before. Depending on how much you had to pay for this compounded medication, you may want to look into buying Keralyt or Carmol 10 online.

  14. QUESTION:
    Kerotosis pilaris all over the body?
    i have this skin disease called keratosis pilaris also known as chicken skin, it is present all over my body but it didnt have any rashes or redness its just itchy and embarrassing, what can i do to improve my skin conditions i want to get rid of it is there any medicine or treatment you can suggest

    • ANSWER:
      Eucerin cream worked for mine (it contains urea, which is the active ingredient for treating keratosis pilaris). However, if yours is pretty stubborn or widespread, you can go see a dermatologist. They can give you a stronger concentration than what is available over the counter. Hope this helps!

  15. QUESTION:
    Keratosis pilaris!!! HELP!?
    Does an body know how to get rid of KP. its so nasty and i hate it. im willing to try anything!! so yeah!

    • ANSWER:
      i also have KP and may dermatologist recommended putting aveeno lotion and a moisturizer on them. KPs are permanent but they can be lightened if they are moist. do nut scrub your KP because it will only make your skin more dry, and thus increase them and make them darker.

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. But most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.

      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.

      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system.

      Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.

      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  16. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris HELP!!?
    Ok so I have Keratosis Pilaris all up and down my arms. It's embarrassing....and nothing works. I've been trying to figure out ways to cover it up with regular foundation and I was wondering what anyone had to recommend. I heard MAC's face and body was a good one, but are there any at Sephora???

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  17. QUESTION:
    Can you get rid of keratosis Pilaris?
    Is it possible to get rid of keratosis Pilaris? Like to make it go away completely?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

      [My note: This article is followed by 188 comments from people who have been inflicted with KP.]

  18. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris. Those of you who have/had it, how do you get rid of it. It's supposed to go away by the time I'm 20, but I hate my skin and want it to look nice now. Any tricks?

    • ANSWER:
      who said it goes away by 20?someone gave wrong advice-i didnt even get it till i was 45! answer-get loofah.scrub gently with every bath/shower.go to pharmacy and get any skin cream containing "urea"-no,its not urine!its a chemical in the skincream that dissolves the excess keratin buildup that leads to keratosirs pilaris.worked for me-its 2 years later,and my arms are smooth!good luck!oh-also-dont wear tight sleeves in the winter-wear something looser so ur pores can breath.most people first develop this in winter,tight sleeves contribute to the problem. ps- i love mexico,especially chiapas.

  19. QUESTION:
    Can you use calmurid cream on your face?
    I have keratosis pilaris. Doctor diagnosed me last year. I have been using calmurid cream on my arms and legs since then. However now I have developed it on my cheeks. She said continue using the cream you have but when I got home the leaflet didn't say anything about using it on your face.

    • ANSWER:
      How does it work?

      This cream contains the active ingredients urea and lactic acid. It is used to moisturise and rehydrate dry, scaly skin.

      Dry skin results from lack of water in the outer layer of skin cells known as the stratum corneum. When this layer becomes dehydrated it loses its flexibility and becomes cracked, scaly and sometimes itchy. The stratum corneum contains natural water-holding substances, including urea, which retain water seeping up from the deeper layers of the skin. Water is also normally retained in the stratum corneum by a surface film of natural oil (sebum) and broken-down skin cells, which slow down evaporation of water from the skin surface.

      The skin dries out when too much water evaporates from its surface. This increases as we get older, and is made worse by washing, because hot water and soap remove the layer of natural oil on the skin surface.

      When urea is applied to the skin it penetrates the stratum corneum, where it readily absorbs and retains water. This increases the capacity of the skin to hold moisture, and the skin therefore becomes rehydrated.

      Lactic acid is known as a keratolytic. When applied to the skin it breaks down keratin, which is a protein that forms part of the skin structure. In conditions such as chronic eczema and ichthyosis, excessive amounts of keratin causes the skin cells to harden, and makes the skin become thickened and scaly. Lactic acid breaks down the keratin in the hardened and thickened skin, helping to shed skin cells from the area to which it is applied, and soften and improve the appearance of dry, scaly skin. This action also improves the ability of the urea to penetrate the skin and rehydrate it.

      The moisturising base of this cream also provides a layer of oil on the surface of the skin, which helps prevent water from evaporating from the skin surface.

      What is it used for?

      * Inherited, non-inflammatory dryness and scaling of the skin (ichthyosis, xeroderma)

      * Other dry, scaly skin disorders

      Warning!

      * This preparation is for external use only.

      * If you experience stinging when applying this medicine and this prevents you using it, the medicine can be diluted with an equal quantity of aqueous cream for a week of treatment. After this time you should be able to use it undiluted. Seek further advice from your pharmacist.

      * Avoid contact of this medicine with the eyes and the moist membranes lining the inside of certain parts of the body, eg mouth, nasal passages (mucous membranes).

      Not to be used in

      * Known sensitivity or allergy to any ingredient

      This medicine should not be used if you are allergic to one or any of its ingredients. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you have previously experienced such an allergy.

      If you feel you have experienced an allergic reaction, stop using this medicine and inform your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

      Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

      Certain medicines should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding. However, other medicines may be safely used in pregnancy or breastfeeding providing the benefits to the mother outweigh the risks to the unborn baby. Always inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, before using any medicine.

      * There are no known harmful effects when this medicine is used during pregnancy.

      * This preparation may be used safely by breastfeeding mothers, providing it is not applied to the breasts prior to breastfeeding. This will avoid ingestion by the infant.

      Side effects

      Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Because a side effect is stated here, it does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect.

      * Stinging on application

      The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the drug's manufacturer.

      For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist.

      How can this medicine affect other medicines?

      By smoothing and softening the skin this medicine can increase the absorption of other medicines that are applied to the skin. This can be useful in conditions such as eczema because it improves the ability of other medicines, such as corticosteroid creams, to penetrate the skin and reduce inflammation.

  20. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris treatment for a guy?
    I'm 17 years old and I have Keratosis Pilaris on my upper arms.

    It apparently is also causing my cheeks to be perpetually red and blotchy.

    I don't like the way it looks and I would love to know some treatments for it. Do any of you have personal experience with it?

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  21. QUESTION:
    Treatments for keratosis pilaris?
    What are some that have help improve the condition? i've tried eucerin and it went away but a lot came back after a while.

    • ANSWER:
      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  22. QUESTION:
    How can you treat Keratosis pilaris? plz?
    PLEASE HELP ME!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a disorder of hyperkeratosis. It is a very common benign, condition that manifests as folliculocentric keratotic papules in characteristic areas of the body.

      There is currently no cure but there are therapies used to help the condition including:
      - prevention of skin dryness by using appropriate soaps
      - emollients, lactic acid, tretinoin cream (Retin A), alpha-hydroxy acid lotions, urea cream, salicylic acid, and topical steroids
      - medium potency steroid cream

      Please ocnsult your dermatologist as they should be able to provide you with an appropriate treatment regimen as mentioned about.

      Here is an emedicine article describing the condition, treatment, etc.
      http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic211.htm

      Hope this helps

  23. QUESTION:
    i have keterios polarius[sp?] and i put this cream on my legs and now they're burning.?
    could it be the cream?

    today is the first day that i've used it.

    it's called:
    Hi-Tech Pharmacal
    Urea cream (40% Urea)
    Rx Only.

    that's what the tube says.

    • ANSWER:
      Probably keratosis pilaris. Urea cream usually is pretty mild, though if you have little sores from scratching it can burn, so back off. Keratosis pilaris is always rough to treat because you walk a fine line between exfoliating aggressively enough to be effective and causing irritation. Unfortunately, erring toward irritation in the short term is usually necessary to get any worthwhile results. The good news is that keratosis pilaris is something people usually grow out of (if you are past your 20s, I would question the diagnosis unless you've had it since adolescence.) The bad news is that many other skin conditions can be confused with keratosis pilaris, so a return to the doctor is warranted.

  24. QUESTION:
    My 2 year old has keratosis pilaris?
    My 2 year old daughter has keratosis pilaris. I know it's hereditary, I have it as well. She has it all over her arms and on her cheeks. I need some suggestions for good lotions I can use on her. I have tried all the J&J products and the baby Aveeno lotion. Is there anything else out there?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is a site all about your daughters condition:

      http://kpkids.net/

      What is the recommended treatment for KP in children?

      Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris is not medically necessary; however, many parents of children with this condition choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      A common initial treatment of Keratosis Pilaris is often intensive moisturizing. In mild to moderate cases of KP, moisturizers and skin lubricants may help with the dryness and ease KP symptoms, but usually do not clear up the bumps in more severe cases.

      The most common treatment recommended for moderate to sever cases of KP is a topical lotion or cream (urea preparations, lactic acid creams and topical retinoids). Mild peeling agents (alpha-hydroxy acids and skin-smoothing scrubs) are the most effective in opening the clogged hair follicles by removing the excess skin.
      Keratosis Pilaris symptoms often worsen during the Winter months, when your child's skin will likely be the driest. In the Summer months, the increase in humidity leaves skin less dry, and the pinkish-red coloration can easily become camouflaged.

  25. QUESTION:
    Do the scars from keratosis pilaris go away?
    I've had KP for a long time and I started using a lotion that has zinc oxide in it to get rid of it. After a couple weeks I've noticed most of the KP is gone but they've left scab-looking things where the bumps used to be. Do those ever go away on their own?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris

      If you have stumbled upon this page from the film on Youtube this is actually a blog. The blog is about a KP sufferer and selected treatment. Feel free to continue reading this page which is dedicated to the treatment of KP. It applies to men and woman of all ages and nationalities who believe they have the skin disorder Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are a number of ways to treat KP. You can treat the actual skin in forms of creams, lotions or gels. A lot of KP suffers often have deficiencies but there are a select number of food supplement which are especially good for KP. Oil pulling is something fairly new but some have sworn by complete removal of their KP with this self-healing therapy. As with many skin problems, diet usually has some part to play. It is not necessary to completely alter your diet but a few changes here and there may help better your KP in the long run.

      Each treatment option has been identified below. The list has been compiled with research gathered from books and various Internet sites/forums. They are not intended as miracle cures but more of guidelines to how you can make KP better. The list is quite long so feel free to use the nav below to jump to a specific topic.
      Topical Treatment

      Glycolic acid

      An alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) that has exfoliating properties. AHA speeds up the process of skin exfoliation. It helps retexture the skin leaving it smooth and soft. This treatment can takes months to give you results but they can be astonishing. Once treatment is complete you simply need to maintain the KP condition, which will be much easier. You can buy Glycolic acid as a cream, lotion, gel, peel or soap. The idea is to apply product to KP areas twice a day for at least 2 months. If minimal or no improvements are seen after this time you can upgrade to a higher potency. Below is a list of some highly recommended Glycolic acid.

      DCL AHA revitalizing lotion. This lotion comes in 10, 15 and 20% glycolic acid. You should start of with 10 or 15% then move up to 20% if you feel a stronger strength will do better for you.

      Neostrata lotion plus. You can get this at 15% glycolic acid.

      Zirh body Bar. This is a soap that contains triple alpha hydroxy acid, gentle enough to use daily in the shower. It is Ideal for pre-use of AHA lotion/cream/gel.

      Dermadoctor KP Duty. Skin care products by dermatologist Audrey Kunin. KP Duty is one of the few products that have been specifically designed and advertised for KP conditions. There is a moisturizing cream and a chemical medi-exfoliater. They contain the following ingredients:

      Glycolic Acid ? Powerful AHA
      Sodium Glycolate ? Glycolic Acid salt with buffering action
      Green Tea ? Botanical antioxidant with soothing anti-redness action
      Algae ? Soothing botanical
      Dimethicone ? Barrier agent ? reduces moisture evaporation

      KP Cream only
      Urea ? Humectant
      Sodium Hyaluronate ? Potent hydrating agent
      Further Treatment

      Lactic acid

      Another AHA but in lower strength which makes it ideal for older children. In high potency it is good for adult skin more so for stubborn itchy flare-ups. Lactic acid is more of a moisturizer than exfoliator. Glycolic acid is a much more deeper treatment. Use Lactic acid to treat the dry/rough skin symptoms of KP.

      Lacticare lotion. This is a good product which is best for mild to moderate dry skin symptoms of KP. It is ideal for older children.

      Amlactin. At 12% lactic acid this is far more potent and ideal for moderate to severe dry skin symptoms.

      Vaseline intensive rescue foot cream. This is a foot cream but works great on overall body skin. It contains Lactic acid and moisturizes skin with great effect. The product is quite cheap which is quite good, some other lactic products can cost considerably more.

      Urea

      Urea is a powerful humectant, it can soften the crutiest skin. Urea is a good option for moisturizing KP conditions.

      Carmol 10 or 20. Carmol 20 being stronger is a nonlipid vanishing cream for rough, dry skin.

      Retinoids

      KP can sometimes be complicated by acne. An ideal solution would be a vitamin A cream like Retin-A. Overeager use of a vitamin A cream won?t hasten the return of silky skin. It is more likely to leave skin peeling and painful. This type of cream should be used sparingly, increasing the dose over time or as tolerated.

      Afirm. This is a great product to start with if you should choose the vitamin A cream route.

      Microdermabrasion

      This type of treatment should be reserved for special occasions. Microdermabrasion provides temporary appearance of skin that looks healthy. KP is a chronic condition. Choosing microdermabrasion as ongoing treatment will be never-ending. Even though it provides immediate result it is much better to choose a treatment you can do at home i.e. AHA. Over time you will have visible result that will only need to be maintain in the future. Microdermabrasion would be an endless journey of treatment. There are however, a few less costly at home microdermabrasion products you could try. Give them a go them if you have severe cases of KP.
      Alternatives

      Chemical and acid products may not be an option for everyone. Some may find their skin is quite sensitive. There are other things you could try to treat KP. These include moisturizing with oils such Olive or Coconut. You can make your own scrubs made of sea salt and your favourite body oil.

      For sometime I believed I had oily skin and the polka dots on my legs were hundreds of blocked pores that needed vigorous scrubbing everyday. I now know that I have dry skin and must keep it moisturized. The polka dots on my legs are not blocked pores; they are my hair follicles that have become inflamed by my KP. Harsh scrubbing will only make the skin worse and on darker skin cause extreme scarring. Gentle exfoliation and consistent moisturizing will keep your skin looking the best it can without chemical treatment.
      Internal Treatment

      KP sufferers usually lack a kind of vitamin or other essential body goodness. You stand a better chance of controlling your KP if you treat the body inside as well as out. Good Nutrition is relevant to any medical condition, especially for the skin. The three deficiencies that stand out the most for KP sufferers are Vitamins A, sulfur (MSM) and Omega 3.

      Vitamin A

      Some people might caution about overdoing it with Vitamin A. In high amounts Vit A is known to be toxic, BUT, it seems to me that we are less vulnerable in the first place as the one of the reasons our KP exists is due to the fact that our bodies are just not processing the Vitamin A from the foods we eat. Even then, it would take an enormous amount of Vitamin A: like drinking five gallons of carrot juice everyday to get intoxicated. Vitamin A is available in most good health stores. It usually comes as part of a multivitamin but that alone may not be enough. Carrot juice and walnuts are high in Vitamin A. Having the right diet is an easy way to get ample amounts of the good stuff.

      Sulfur (MSM)

      Methyl Sulfonyl Methane (MSM) is a nutritional supplement found to have exceptional healing properties for skin conditions. MSM can be obtained from eating raw, dark leafy vegetables, shellfish and whole grains, or via convenient supplements. One thing KP victims suffer from of ALL races is a deficiency of SULPHUR. MSM relieves skin problems, leathery cracked skin, wrinkles, and skin itching. MSM reduces scar tissue, moles, brown spots, black spots, skin tumours, cuts, and burns. Taking MSM supplements each day will go along way when treating your KP.

      Omega 3

      Despite all the concerns about fat in our diet, the body does require healthy fats and oils to function. Omega 3 is one of those healthy fats, that helps nourish and keep our skin healthy. Omega 3 can found in food such as oily fish or you can purchase it as a food supplement.

  26. QUESTION:
    Rosacea and keratosis pilaris?
    hi i have both rosacea and keratosis pilaris. i am red everywhere and it is so embaressing. people are always asking how i got such a bad "sunburn" i hate it. any ways or treatments you guys know of? also do you think a tanning bed would help?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris:
      -Light exfoliants, things with glycolic acid in them, ammonium lactate, urea
      -Apply a heavy moisturizing cream
      -dry brushing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qG5M5Je-IJc
      -sun tanning http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcqzP2tZQik

      Rosacea
      -Always wash face with a gentle soap-free cleanser, use lukewarm water
      -keep face moisturized with a non-comedogenic moisturizer and with SPF

      I recommend Cetaphil and Eucerin.

  27. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris - how to REMOVE it?
    makes the skin look unsightly....help please!

    • ANSWER:
      Self-care

      Although self-help measures won't cure keratosis pilaris, they may help improve the appearance of your skin. You may find these measures beneficial:

      Be gentle when washing your skin. Vigorous scrubbing or removal of the plugs may only irritate your skin and aggravate the condition.
      After washing or bathing, gently pat or blot your skin dry with a towel so that some moisture remains on the skin.
      Apply the moisturizing lotion or lubricating cream while your skin is still moist from bathing. Choose a moisturizer that contains urea or propylene glycol, chemicals that soften dry, rough skin.
      Apply an over-the-counter product that contains lactic acid twice daily. Lactic acid helps remove extra keratin from the surface of the skin.
      Use a humidifier to add moisture to the air inside your home. Low humidity dries out your skin.

      Prescription medications used to treat keratosis pilaris include:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do I treat keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

  29. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have some red bumps on top of my arms(both lower and upper) and I have it even worse on top of my thighs and I'm starting to feel it on my calves now. No they are not razor bumps, I've had it since elementary school. I want to get rid of it soon, summer is on its way and I'm tired of covering up. I feel very self conscious about it. What do it do? I do exfoliate. My parents can't afford a dermatologist.

    • ANSWER:
      Treating "Chicken Skin" Bumps: Keratosis Pilaris
      By Audrey Kunin, MD

      Chicken skin bumps ? such a simple yet instantly identifiable description of the skin problem named keratosis pilaris (commonly dubbed "KP"). Can't you just visualize it? These minute, rough bumps with their grater-like texture are most frequently scattered along the upper arms and thighs. However, the cheeks, back and buttocks can all become involved at one time or another. They're annoying, unsightly, chronic and incredibly commonplace.

      If you don't have this condition, odds are that you know somebody who does. Whenever I talk about KP, inevitably the individual with whom I'm conversing pauses, gasps, then exclaims, "I didn't know that's what that was! My child, husband, coworker (fill in the blank as appropriate) has that!"

      Because keratosis pilaris affects 50% of the entire world's population, this reaction isn't surprising. KP is somewhat more common in children and adolescents; 50 to 80% of children have KP. Adults needn't feel neglected. Keratosis pilaris affects 4 out of every 10 adults, too. Women are slightly more prone to developing keratosis pilaris. Most people with KP are unaware that not only is there a designated medical term for the condition, but that treatment exists.

      Keratosis pilaris is hereditary, inherited as an autosomal dominant gene. This is similar to the brown versus blue eye color phenomenon. All it takes is a single gene from either parent to find oneself with less than perfectly smooth skin. But not everyone can point a finger at who's to blame since only 30 to 50% of KP patients have a positive family history.

      In general, keratosis pilaris is aesthetically displeasing, but medically harmless. It's always possible that it might become more noticeable at puberty. It's caused because excess skin cells build up around individual hair follicles. Sometimes, a hair is unable to reach the surface and becomes trapped beneath the debris. During puberty, this is an ideal set-up for triggering follicular acne. But more often than not, KP improves with age.

      Keratosis pilaris creates havoc with the skin's surface as a raised, rough, bumpy texture and uneven nutmeg-grater appearance forms. It is often quite noticeable. Inflammation within each hair follicle can cause embarrassing pinpoint red or brown polka dots to form beneath each miniature mound of keratin. Seasonal fluctuations can be seen with improvement more likely during the summer.

      Controlling Your Outer Self

      Since keratosis pilaris is genetically predetermined, it may not be curable but should be controllable. There is no reason to passively take a ?wait and see? approach. After all, there's no guarantee that you'll outgrow it. And while most with KP may not realize there really is something they can do about it, KP can really traumatize some sufferers.

      Treatment is all about smoothing away the bumps. Therapy can eliminate the bumps, improve the texture, eliminate acne-causing plugs, and improve the overall appearance. Chemical exfoliation needn't be fraught with irritation, redness or discomfort.

      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea
      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Vitamin A Treatments
      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is ongoing ? if discontinued, skin begins reforming around hair follicles. Maintenance is the best way to maintain silky smooth skin. Letting your keratosis pilaris show is unnecessary and so easy to control. Get ready for sleeveless fashion now and look your absolute best!

      [My note: This article is followed by 188 comments from people who have been inflicted with KP.]

  30. QUESTION:
    For people who have Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have horrid KP on my arms and legs, and I want to get rid of it.

    For people who have had it, what product worked well for you in treating KP?

    • ANSWER:

      Though quite common with young children, keratosis pilaris can occur at any age. It may improve, especially during the summer months, only to later worsen. Gradually, keratosis pilaris resolves on its own.

      When to see a doctor
      Keratosis pilaris isn't a serious medical condition, and treatment usually isn't necessary. However, if you're concerned about the appearance of your skin, consult your family doctor or a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist). He or she can often make a diagnosis by examining your skin and the characteristic scaly plugs.

      Causes
      Keratosis pilaris results from the buildup of keratin ? a hard protein that protects your skin from harmful substances and infection. The keratin forms a scaly plug that blocks the opening of the hair follicle. Usually many plugs form, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin.

      Why keratin builds up is unknown. But it may occur in association with genetic diseases or with other skin conditions, such as ichthyosis vulgaris or atopic dermatitis. Keratosis pilaris also occurs in otherwise healthy people. Dry skin tends to worsen the condition.

      Preparing for your appointment
      You're likely to start by first seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred immediately to a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist).

      Because appointments can be brief, and because there's often a lot to cover, it's a good idea to be well prepared for your appointment. Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your doctor.

      What you can do
      Your time with your doctor is limited, so preparing a list of questions beforehand will help you make the most of your appointment. List your questions from most important to least important in case time runs out. For keratosis pilaris, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

      What is likely causing my symptoms?
      What are other possible causes for my symptoms?
      Is my condition likely temporary or chronic?
      What is the best course of action?
      What are the alternatives to the primary approach that you're suggesting?
      Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing me?
      In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask questions during your appointment at any time that you don't understand something.

      What to expect from your doctor
      Your doctor is likely to ask you several questions. Being ready to answer them may reserve time to go over any points you want to discuss more. Your doctor may ask:

      When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
      Have your symptoms been continuous, or occasional?
      What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
      What, if anything, appears to worsen your symptoms?
      Tests and diagnosis
      There is no laboratory test or skin test to diagnose keratosis pilaris. Instead, it's typically diagnosed based on an examination of your skin and a review of your medical history. Your doctor will ask questions about your signs and symptoms.

      Treatments and drugs
      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. But most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following prescription medications:

      Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin). Available in a cream or lotion, 12 percent ammonium lactate reduces roughness and softens the keratin plugs. It won't, however, lessen the redness caused by the condition.
      Urea (Carmol, Keralac). Urea moisturizes and softens dry, rough skin. It also helps loosen and remove the dead skin cells. Side effects include redness, stinging and skin irritations.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatments because of potential side effects.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

      Lifestyle and home remedies
      Self-help measures won't cure keratosis pilaris, but they can help improve the appearance of your skin. You may find these measures beneficial:

      Be gentle when washing your skin. Vigorous scrubbi

  31. QUESTION:
    I have really bad keratosis pilaris.. hellp?
    im embarrassed to show off my skin, im sick of hiding my skin, i want to wear t-shirts without a care or worry, i want to feel comfortable, what can i do to get rid of this KP. iv had enough with it, i want to be normal...

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      Treatments and drugs

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.

      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.

      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  32. QUESTION:
    Keratosis pilaris question?
    I have a mild case of keratosis pilaris on my arms and I've been using scented lotion from Victorias secret and it's been clearing up pretty well. But I've hear that scented lotions aggravate KP. Should I switch to a scent-less lotion or continue using what I'm using?

    • ANSWER:
      Use whatever works for you. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  33. QUESTION:
    What can i do to treat keratosis pilaris?
    bumps on the back of the arms

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  34. QUESTION:
    KERATOSIS PILARIS HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?
    Ok, I have had keratosis pilaris forever, and I am literally so, so sick of it. It makes me feel gross, and just I don't know what else to say other than gross. Can someone, anyone just tell me what helped with your keratosis pilaris, any help or advice would be great, thankyou so much.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.
      Hope it helps.Take care and regards.

  35. QUESTION:
    How do i treat Keratosis pilaris?
    It itches and its on my arms and thighs please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Treatments and drugs
      By Mayo Clinic staff

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation. For that reason, topical exfoliants aren't recommended for young children.

      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A, Renova, Avita) and tazarotene (Avage, Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids. If you're pregnant or nursing, your doctor may opt to delay topical retinoid therapy or choose an alternative treatment.

      Laser therapy. Certain types of keratosis pilaris involving severe redness and inflammation have been successfully treated with laser therapy. Laser treatment involves passing intense bursts of light into targeted areas of skin. This type of treatment may require repeat sessions over the course of a few months, depending on your response.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.

  36. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of them? the keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment 4 keratosis pilaris is always effective, but u can try reducing the appearance. You can go 2 the doctor and ask for akeratolytic cream (it can help reduce scaliness) or ask for tetracycline-type antibiotic.
      However, antiseptic skin cleanser may get rid of them.

      Also, try urea cream (like Carmol 20) and ask your pharmacist to mix it with 2% to 3% salicylic acid. (this will minimize the appearance of bumps) if that doesnt work...u need 2 see a dermatologist.

      I can't guarentee anything since i havent tried it (because i dont have keratosis pilarsis)...hope it helps and good luck

  37. QUESTION:
    KP (keratosis pilaris) treatment!?
    Any suggestions?

    Should you also use something more gentler to wash your body with or is a scrubbie okay?

    Trying to get rid of it. I know there's no cure but, I know there's gotta be something out there that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Glycolic Acid
      An array of alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) are utilized in a dermatologist's quest to smooth out keratosis pilaris. Glycolic and lactic acids work as chemical exfoliating agents. Dermatologists often turn to over-the-counter and prescription lactic acid products to palliate KP.

      Urea is one of those special little known ingredients used by dermatologists to dramatically soften the crustiest of skin concerns. It is an awesome additive in improving the appearance of KP.

      Patients may turn to prescription vitamin A creams to help restore a smooth texture in recalcitrant cases, or as a way to help treat keratosis pilaris complicated by acne. Potent over-the-counter retinols (up to 1%) are another option. Overeager use won't help hasten silky skin. Instead it can leave the skin parched, peeling and painful. A tiny dab every other night is more than adequate for beginners.

      Immunomodulators
      Since keratosis pilaris is often thought of as a manifestation of eczema, it stands to reason that new prescription medications may play a role in treating keratosis pilaris. I tend to reserve this for more complex cases or for the patient who already has a tube at home; occasional use may be a helpful, off-label option.

      Scrubs, Rubs and Peels
      It's true that scrubbing at dry, bumpy skin can make it a tad smoother. But it doesn't entirely smooth KP away. Nor does it eradicate the little pink polka dots. But incorporating a scrub, a series of microdermabrasions or even getting a chemical peel can certainly jumpstart your way to smoothness, especially as we get nearer to sleeveless weather. Just remember that since keratosis pilaris is a chronic condition, committing oneself to never-ending weekly sessions of more medically useful microdermabrasion or chemical peels rapidly adds up financially.

  38. QUESTION:
    Keratosis pilaris! (Chicken skin) Help!!!!?
    I'm turning 15 and I have keratosis pilaris all over my arms and butt!! It suxxxx! Is it possible for it to disappear with age for me? (Thats what happened to my mom, so will it happen to me?) For people who also have it, what worked for you? What vitamins should I take? Does laser hair removal make it go away? What are the best lotions for it? And does Bioskin Treatment work? How do I make the redness go away? Please help!!!!!!!
    10 pts for best answer!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Calmurid cream....the lactic acid is combined with urea and so it unblocks pores aswell as moisturise...it's good for this, try it! You can buy it over the counter (ask at the chemist), or cheaper if your doc will prescribe it.

      Exfoliate too but gently, don't scratch or overdry.

      I doubt any of the other things you mention will help, but a dermatologist can give the best advice. It will improve as you get older I'm sure.

      For cover up, try mixing a light body lotion with a drop or two of foundation - this will come out slightly lighter than the foundation colour.

      But don't be too self conscious, there are worse things out there and the treatments above should help. Also the sun does help in small doses so let your arms get a bit this spring (with SPF).

  39. QUESTION:
    i have keratosis pilaris on my face?
    i'm a guy and i was wondering how often should i exfoliate my face? i use this stuff i got fromt he gap and use it like 4 times a week, but it doesn't to be clearing up to fast, do i need a lotion or something to go w/ it? i also i wash it in-between uses, w/ this clearisil stuff...

    • ANSWER:
      "Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people."

  40. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris help?
    i was just wondering if there was any lotion without acid and i dont have to use sunscreen. example urea . that can really help my keratosis pilaris. please help

    • ANSWER:
      Wash affected areas with mild soaps or cleansers.

      Keep skin moisturized as much as possible, as keratosis pilaris tends to worsen with excessively dry skin, particularly in winter months.

      Apply emollients several times a day, especially after bathing. Products containing lactic acid, salicylic acid, petroleum jelly, alpha-hydroxy acid, urea cream, tretinoin cream or topical steroids may improve your symptoms.


urea cream for keratosis pilaris

Natural Nail Fungus Treatment

Fungal nail infection is the most common nail complaint. Men are more likely to suffer than women since lifestyle can often be a major factor, and men are more likley to play outdoor sports and share communal changing rooms. It is highly unlikely that children can become infected unless there is a history in the family or both parents have the condition.
Unless you suffer from nail fungus, it's unlikely that you know the condition exists. Onychomycosis can affect both the fingernails and toenails and can cause the sufferer to hide or cover their feet and hands because it is not a pleasant looking condition. The fungus will affect neighboring nails. Both unsightly and painful. And the infection is highly likely to get worse.
Fungal nail infections are more common among toenails as fungus thrives on warm, damp and dark environments. Thus, a sock covered hot sweaty foot is ideal for the fungus to survive and spread. If unchecked the infection can spread from toe to toe and can be passed from person to person. It is not unusual for a person to have ten digits of both feet and hands infected with fungus, usually after this the sufferer will usually seek treatment.
Although painful, nail fungus is not a disabilitating or a life threatening condition but does carry a certain stigma in todays beauty conscious society. So having discolored and disfigured nails is not something that would attract someone to you. Nail fungus is easier to treat in the early stages of the infection. If you do suspect that you may have a fungal nail infection of the toenails or fingernails it is highly advised to seek attention now before its spreads.
The longer you leave the condition the worse it will become. A fungal nail infection will simply not go away of its own accord. There are different treatments available ranging from the home remedy to the herbal to pharmaceutical. Before researching the available treatments it is highly advisable to understand exactly what you are introducing to your body.
Nail Fungus can be treated and completely got rid of even the most severe cases. A different course of action is required for each. You should take all factors into consideration: effectiveness, timescale to cure the fungal infection, future preventative properties, cost and health and safety aspect. Some nail fungus treatments can produce nasty side effects and some offer nothing by way of a cure.
The postives of using a home remedy to treat nail fungus is that nothing alien is introduced to your body; most home remedies involve external application so the possible side effects are minimal or greatly reduced. The negative aspect to home nail fungus treatment is that it is a fairly long winded approach and success depends on the severity of the fungal infection.
The nature of the disorder and the stigma that comes associated with the thought of having a fungus growing on a part of the body makes seeking treating for the infection discreetly quite a difficult one. There are many nail fungus treatments available to freely buy without restriction of a prescription but availability does not necesarily mean that they will be effective.
Prescription only anti fungal medication is usually administered orally in almost all circumstances a hardcore pharmaceutical drug is present to combat the infection. Often described as like cracking a walnut with a sledge hammer, prescription only grade anti fungal medication can often lead other complications and some cases causes more problems than its solves.
Natural nail fungus remedies promise effective treatment. They contain many active ingredients that can immediately offer relief for nail fungus symptoms and they also work at eliminating nail fungus overall. They deliver medicine through the trans-dermal delivery system. This works by absorption of active nutrients through the skin. As a result of using natural nail fungus remedies, you can heal damaged nails and restores natural color quickly.
If you suffer from nail fungus, try using natural remedy to provide the relief you are seeking without chemicals, pain or harsh side effects. They are made from a readily absorbable, non-irritating base that is absorbed quickly; thus symptoms of nail fungus are reduced right away. Natural nail fungus remedies are available in local drug stores, but for the sake of privacy it may be better to get them online due to confidentiality. To learn more, please go to http://www.forcesofnatureusa.com.



natural nail fungus treatment

How To Treat Toenail Fungus Fast

Calgary's best option for toenail fungus removal. At Westside Laser and Light we use the Cutera Laser Genesis to treat toenail fungus. Toenail fungus (or onychomycosis) is fairly common condition, affecting one in ten Canadians. Drug free, comfortable and absolutely no side effects.

Historically difficult to treat, oral or topical medications can be prescribed. This can take weeks or months to resolve and prescription medication can sometimes have a harmful effect on the liver.

Fortunately, lasers have been gaining popularity for their fast-acting results. Treatments are safe and painless, lasting about 10-15 minutes.

Our office uses the Cutera GenesisPlus laser for treating toenail fungus and warts. It uses the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser, which has been proven to be the most effective laser for treating onychomycosis.

The GenesisPlus is a new laser perfected for safely and effectively treating onychomycosis (toenail fungus). By targeting the fungus directly, GenesisPlus gets to the source of the problem immediately.Tiny pulses of light from the GenesisPlus laser pass through the toenail to the fungus underneath. The fungus is irradiated without any damage to the surrounding nail or skin.
Depending on how many toes are affected, the GenesisPlus laser procedure will take 10-20 minutes.

Is GenesisPlus in not painful at all.Most people feel a slight warming sensation during the the procedure. No pain medication is needed and most people find the treatment very easy to tolerate. Most patients need 2 treatments, but some need more if they have severe cases of toenail fungus.There are no restrictions on my activity post procedure.You can resume your normal activities immediately.You wont notice anything immediately following treatment. However, as your nail grows out, the new nail growth should be clear. Toe nails grow slowly especially nails infected with fungus. So, it may take 6-12 months for your toenail to clear.

Reinfection with toenail fungus may be acquired anywhere from your environment, for example, in damp areas such as public swimming pools. Consult with your healthcare professional to understand how to prevent toenail fungus from reoccurring. While it is important to remove nail polish, decoration and jewelry prior to treatment, you can reapply nail polish 24 hours after treatment.

Traditional treatments such as nail trimming, topical medicine, oral medicine or nail removal have significant drawbacks. Nail trimming doesnt treat the fungus. Topical medicines need to be applied for 12 months and have a low success rate. Oral medicines are taken for 3 months but can cause liver or kidney problems. GenesisPlus is a quick, easy, safe, effective procedure that treats the fungus at the source.

The cost is 475.00 for one treatment or 2 treatments for 850.00. Well worth the cost when compared to all the other options which can be very hard on your liver and kidney's and have very loww success rate.



how to treat toenail fungus fast

Skin Fungus Treatment

The medical term for nail fungus is onychomycosis. Despite the commonly used term fungal nails, onychomycosis describes both fungus and yeast infections in the nail. The prevalence in America is about two to three percent, but some have reported it as high as thirteen percent. Nail fungus affects men twice as often as it affects women. The prevalence among elderly individuals and diabetics is twenty five percent. In the 1800s, fungal nails were very rare.
The increased prevalence is linked to the increased exposure to fungus through the use of showering facilities in gyms, the use of hot tubs, saunas and public pool areas. There is an increase in occlusive footwear, an increase in sporting activities, an increase in diabetes and increase in age of the general population. The risk factors for developing nail fungus are increasing age, male gender, nail trauma, sweaty feet, poor circulation, poor hygeine, foot fungus and a compromised immune system.
Athlete's tend to have a higher rate of fungus infection than non-athletes. The moisture in the shoe combined with repeated nail trauma increases the chance of infection. Hikers, runners, backpackers, soccer, basketball and tennis players, athletes wearing loose fitting shoes that allow jamming of the nails against the shoe and any individual wearing shoes that toe tight are at high risk.
One of the most important steps in preventing nail infections is to keep nails well trimmed, but not over trimming them. Cutting nail too short can cause small cuts and tears, which could allow fungal organisms to penetrate your nail bed. To prevent toenail fungal infections, keep your feet as dry and clean as possible at all times. Change socks and shoes frequently. If you have athlete's foot, treat it regularly. Do not share nail clippers with anyone else, as it is possible to transmit the fungus.
Treating nail fungus is very difficult. If you have fungal nails that cause pressure, pain or infection, consider talking to your doctor about prescription medications or nail removal. Make sure you take precautions to prevent re-infection and take multiple approaches to eradicate the problem. If your fungal nails are only unsightly and don't cause any discomfort, try a weekly application of an over the counter topical along with methods to prevent re-infection.
There are a number of treatments for nail fungus. The most aggressive and effective way to treat the fungus is with oral anti-fungal medications. The most commonly used medications are Itraconazole and Terbinafine. Both medicines can be quite expensive as they need to be taken once daily for three months. With both medications there is a long list of benign side effects including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, rash, headache, taste disturbances and dizziness.
There are other options besides oral anti-fungal medications. The most effective topical medication is Ciclopirox lacquer. This medication is only available by prescription and is also quite expensive. A few other prescription medications help decrease the thickness of the fungal nails. Unfortunately, they are not very effective. Side effects include burning and redness around the nail.
There are many home remedies and over the counter products that you can purchase. Some home remedies include bleach, tea tree oil, grapeseed extract, and Vics VapoRub. With any home remedy or non-prescription topical, you must understand that the effectiveness of the treatment is fairly low, less than ten percent. If you do try one of these therapies, make sure to use it every day. In general, these treatments are considered very safe.
Combination therapy can help increase the effectiveness of the treatment. If you choose to take an oral medication, make sure you use a topical anti-fungal agent. Nail removal is also an option. Once the nail is removed, the topicals can reach the nail bed and they become more effective. Nails will grow back in over a period of eight to ten months. Permanent nail removal is reserved for those with chronic ingrown nails, ulceration under the nails or pain from the fungal nails.
Natural nail fungus remedy represents a revolutionary advancement in the fight against nail fungus. Its therapeutic agents deliver a pronounced healing effect against infected nails. It combines organic homeopathic medicines to combat nail fungus and key botanicals to sooth damaged skin tissue. The lipophilic formula absorbs deep into skin tissue, where it works to effectively treat nail fungus and promote healthy skin tissue. To learn more, please go to http://www.forcesofnatureusa.com.



skin fungus treatment

Itchy Oozing Rash

The wonderful thing about gold is that it is virtually indestructible. It also does not cause any known allergies or rashes so it is great to give as a gift that wont cause the wearer to break out in a red and itchy mess. Cheaper, non precious, metals sometimes have high nickel content and a huge percentage of people have a natural allergy to this metal. If anyone has ever ended up with an itchy rash, clear fluid oozing from a piercing or a crusty feel to the pierced hole, then it is odds on that the metal contains nickel.

In ancient times, gold was reserved only for the royalty. Indeed, pharaohs were said to be the only ones allowed to wear this precious metal. Thank goodness then that these days, gold is affordable to all but the poorest people in the world.

It is a fascinating metal because it can be beaten into incredibly thin gold leaf. Imagine one cubic centimeter will eventually cover 300 square feet if treated properly. Gold leaf is used for several purposes. One such use is the religious icons so favored by the Russians. Religious icons use gold leaf to represent halos and such and these icons are extremely sought after and valuable. Gold leaf is so thin and light than when artisans are using it they often have to shade the palette is on to stop the slightest draught or waft of air from blowing it away.

Today, gold is used for so many purposes; from gold fillings, to chocolates with flakes of real gold inside. The most popular, naturally is for gold jewelry and to this end there is virtually endless varieties. Many significant occasions in history would not be complete without gold playing its part.

Take, for example, the beautiful gold chalices used in Catholic and other church events. The glistening gold cups are treasured pieces that have been passed down through the generations, sometimes for centuries, and their value is much more than the mere gold content. Gold has somehow inveigled itself into human history and there seems to be no end to the uses, and the value, that man places on it. What better way then to show someone how much they are loved than to present them with a gold piece of jewelry.

Gold chains are an important and popular fashionable item that almost everyone has. Cost of these chains depends on several factors. The carat count (or the concentration of gold the higher the carat the more gold is concentrated into it), the length of the chain, the weight of the chain and so on. Design, too, denotes how costly the piece would be. In years past, these chains would be hand made with each link being carefully beaten into place. These days, machines make continuous lengths of chain and the manufacturer cuts them and makes them into appropriate lengths, depending on the fashion of the day.

Matching bracelets or anklets are also made into the same chain designs and will add a fashionable touch to the wearer. Ankle chains are primarily worn by women, and they accentuate a well turned ankle especially when worn with heels. Earrings also come in so many styles. Of course, todays fashion allows men to wear a single, or even a pair, of earrings and they are particularly liked by the younger set or the hip-hop generation.

Womens earrings can be virtually any style from discreet studs to dangly and long earrings. Hoop earrings, too, are beloved of the hip-hop set and come in many sizes. For the more petite woman, slim and narrow hoops would be better because they dont pull down the earlobes. Long earrings are normally reserved for evening wear but surely, in this day and age, anything goes. If a woman feels comfortable wearing very long earrings during the day then that is her choice and no one would decry her for it.

Fine chains or necklaces are really not meant to hold a pendant or other object. The gold is very soft will break easily if too much weight is added. Better to keep the pendant, cross or other piece for the chains specifically made to hold them. Most jewelers will warn of whether or not the chain is suitable for a pendant.

Rings, always a popular choice, not only come in a variety of designs, they also hold many meanings for different people. Depending on which finger the ring is to be worn, the meaning can be very deep. Obviously, the third finger on the left hand (in most cultures) denotes an engagement or marriage. Some cultures will prefer plain gold wedding bands whereas others will not mind having precious stones, like diamonds, set into them. In other cultures, it is the third finger on the right hand which has the same connotation.

Of course, fashions come and go and one of the most popular fashions of today is the belly button ring. In recent times, even pregnant ladies show off their bulge with abandon and to top it off, they have their belly buttons pierced! Although not for everyone, this fashion has taken the modern world by storm, along with facial studs and decorations. It used to be that Indians would wear gold chains strung from earrings to nose studs on their wedding day but these days, many younger women will wear a similar fashion perhaps for shock value.

Love fashion or hate fashion, it is clear that gold, in all its forms, is here to stay. Just be aware of the lifestyle of the intended party that you wish to give the gift too and choose a piece that is appropriate to them. That means not giving granny a belly button ring (unless she is very eccentric) or a young woman a traditional piece if she is into modern music. For sure, it is very difficult to give a gift of gold that will not be loved and treasured for many years to come.



itchy oozing rash

When Do You Get Pimples

Acne is most common in teenagers, however it can happen at any age, even when an infant. Acne is essentially a widespread teenage ailment, afflicting about 75 percent to 90 % of teens. Acne breakouts are triggered whenever your skin's oil glands are overproducing. Acne can have a rather damaging effect on a teen's self esteem and psychological well becoming. Acne also has practically nothing to complete with poor hygiene. Acne is just just a little situation, no must overreact. Acne just isn't caused by meals you consume. Acne is actually a disorder with the hair follicles and sebaceous glands. Acne develops because of blockages in follicles.

Pimples are embarrassing regardless of whether you happen to be a teenager or an adult. Pimples are a rather common situation for men and women the world more than. Pimples are on the list of worst factors to cope with but for individuals who know the right remedies, it truly is doable to reduce them in just some days. Pimples are induced when there is a build-up of oil and sweat within your skin.

A blemish is actually a disturbance inside the skin due to pimples, blocked pores, a skin rash or scarring. Blemishes are a prevalent occurrence a minimum of as quickly as in life for every single a single of us. Blemishes are certainly not only quite embarrassing; they is often painful also, that is why folks want a superb anti-blemish cream. Blemishes on face might be definitely daunting, creating folks feel conscious and much less confident at social gatherings along with other meetings. Pimples are embarrassing irrespective of whether you happen to be a teenager or an adult. Pimples are a fairly prevalent problem for individuals today the world above. Pimples are among the worst issues to handle but for those who know the appropriate treatments, you are going to be able to lower them in just some days. Pimples are certainly not infectious, so do not be concerned about hanging around people with pimples.

Zits could be 1 sort of skin situation. Zits or red itchy pimples on the face are most helpful if left alone. This is truly a condition that bothers the young a lot more than the adults as it comes on resulting from hormonal disorders and modifications and it's largely for the duration of puberty and adolescence that this happens. Zits scars come from connective tissue that the body tends to make use of to restore damage accomplished to a specific location. Blemishes, a kind of acne, are typically brought on by follicles that turn out to be clogged with oil and dead skin cells. Blemishes are a common occurrence a minimum of when in life for each and every and each and every 1 of us. Blemishes are not only incredibly embarrassing; they might be painful as well, that is why folks want a outstanding anti-blemish cream. Blemishes usually are not some factor any particular person wants to live with.

Zits are a regular component of life. Zits is really a skin situation that hundreds of thousands of people today cope with, in some cases on a every day basis. Zits often begins on the onset of puberty, when your physique raises its manufacturing of androgens, which are the male sex hormones. More Info About How To Get Rid Of A Pimple Under The Skin And Just what You Could Do Concerning It



when do you get pimples

Home Remedy For Toenail Fungus

Fungal infections are common on both fingernails and toenails. Toenails are more prone to be affected by fungus, as these living organisms thrive in dark damp environments available on the foot than on hand.

When inflicted with toenail fungus, the nails can turn yellowish or have brownish discoloration. They may become thick or brittle over time and break or shed on own. Such kind of nails is unsightly, disfiguring, embarrassing and painful most of the times. Toenail fungus can happen to any one. It is a contagious disease that spreads on contact too

Abnormal pH level of the skin, trauma to the nail, unhygienic feet and decreased immunity of the body permit this disease.

Avoiding toenail fungus -

- The fungus thrives in warm moist areas like spas, swimming pools, showers or locker rooms. If you step on a warm puddle or wet floor, you can pick up the infection. After using such public places, it is ideal to wash your feet thoroughly and dry them well.

- Wear cotton socks to absorb moisture from the feet that happens from sweating.

- If your socks are damp, take them off and dry your feet before wearing a fresh pair of dry socks.

- Wear shoes that have a comfortable fit and allow plenty of air and moisture to pass through.

- Avoid sharing towels, washcloths, shoes or any other personal items of those people who have already contracted this disease.

- Wash and dry your feet thoroughly every time. Use a towel vigorously to remove any dead skin and improve circulation.

- Keep your nails cut short, and don't use nail polish.

- Trim your toenails regularly. Trim them into a straight line and then smooth the edges with a nail file.

Toenail fungus remedy

- Tea tree oil is a potent natural antiseptic and fungicide that will help fight your fungus. Apply undiluted tea tree oil with olive oil to the affected toe nail. Alternatively you can put few drops of tea tree oil on toenails and rub it thoroughly every day.

- Soak your toes in Listerine mouthwash. The powerful antiseptic leaves your toe nails looking healthy.

- Soak your toenails for 15 - 20 minutes in basin full of warm water and natural apple cider vinegar mixed in equal proportion. When done, dry your toenails thoroughly. Use a hair dryer on warm setting to absorb all the moisture in and around the toes.

- Put equal amount of tea tree oil and lavender oil on a cotton ball or swab. Dab it under the top edge of the toe nail and surrounding area 2 or 3 times a day. Tea tree oil is natural antibiotic and lavender will help fight the infection and prevent skin irritation.

- Blend 2 drops of Oregano essential oil with a tsp of olive oil. Apply this mixture on the affected area daily for NOT more than three weeks. Oregano essential oil has antiseptic, antibacterial, antiparasitical, antiviral, analgesic and antifungal properties.

- Until the growth of the new nail is complete, apply apple cider vinegar 2 or 3 times a day.

- Lather AHA creams onto your feet before going to bed. This will flush the rough scaly skin from your feet that is more prone to growing fungus.

The reader of this article should exercise all precautions while following instructions on the recipes from this article. Avoid using if you are allergic to something. The responsibility lies with the reader, not the site, and the writer.



home remedy for toenail fungus

Scratchy Skin

Absolutely nothing is even worse compared to dry, scratchy skin. Dried-out skin can take place every time in the past year, but is most widespread in winter (therefore the word, "winter itchiness"). Hear why skin is frequently dry in winter and the way to resolve dry hands, toes, entire body, face as well as lips year-around.

So why do I Experience Dried-out skin during the cold months?

During winter, reduced conditions, minimal moisture but powerful, severe winds diminish skin of the company's natural lipide coating, which will keep your skin layer from blow drying. The dry air from heaters as well as other warming options additionally pull the wetness beyond epidermis. To maintain skin gentle as well as flexible, your ultimate goal isn't to provide dampness to skin, yet to help keep humidity in. TryM.S Electric Facial & Body Brush Spa Cleaning System

M.S Electric Facial & Body Brush Spa Cleaning System

Dried-out skin Suggestion: Maintain Water Halfhearted, Definitely not Hot

Domestic hot water steals skin of dampness leading to dried-out skin, so it will be far better bath in halfhearted water. If you cannot bear this guideline -- I can not -- make an effort to keep the bathrooms short and check out showering only one time every day. This too indicates missing spas (an additional guideline I just now are not able to tolerate). The, hot heat, joined with drying out chemical substances, is pain on dried-out skin.
The identical rule refers to hand-washing: Wash hands in lukewarm, never hot, water (this is the rule I firmly agree to). Should your skin turns red, the river is just too big hot.

Dried-out skin Suggestion: Humidify After Baths or Hand Cleaning

Your skin layer will show you if it's dry. Should your skin seems tight as well as taut, it is time to include moisture. There are numerous suggestions to moisturizing skin that we produced a short article thereon. See Body Moisturizer Suggestions: The way to Keep Skin Moisturized.
Dried-out skin Suggestion: Scrub on the Every week or Semi-Weekly Foundation

Moisturizer may appear far more efficient on correctly exfoliated skin. Work with a sodium or sugar clean within the bath and exfoliate your mind which has a gentle scrub designed for the eye. Observe "How you can Scrub" for numerous fun home elevators exfoliating your whole body along with your face. Additionally, read the greatest face scrubs plus the scrubs to the body.

Have some questions? Send me a contact onwww.melodysusie.comand Ill talk you thru any problems youre having.More information about skin care please refer towww.melodysusie.com



scratchy skin